10" disposable pie pans?


Joined
Jul 23, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
I can never for the life of me find disposable aluminum pie pans that are actually 10"x2", like all my pie pans at home. This means that when I make pies for friends, I always have to overstuff them or throw away some of the filling. This is especially frustrating when I sell them. Has anyone else had this issue? Or, does anyone know where to source disposable deep dish pie pans?
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,579
Reaction score
1,294
I can never for the life of me find disposable aluminum pie pans that are actually 10"x2", like all my pie pans at home. This means that when I make pies for friends, I always have to overstuff them or throw away some of the filling. This is especially frustrating when I sell them. Has anyone else had this issue? Or, does anyone know where to source disposable deep dish pie pans?

Assuming you are in the US...The dimensions are always smaller and shallower than the stated size on a disposable pie plate because in forming the plate, the edge is curled under and the folds are made to make the sides and lip. These reduces the overall size of the original disk of aluminum that they start with before pressing into shape.


To reduce your waste, you have to adjust your production to the pie plates you use in production.


Check out foil-pan.com for small quantity purchases. Disclaimer, I haven’t purchased from them directly. I buy from my local restaurant supply stores.



Look at the capacity for 10” pie plates—not the size. That is your gauge to tell you how to adjust your production. You’ll see some 10” plates are 26 oz, others are 32 oz.



If you go up to an 11” plate, the the dimensions are closer to a 10” after forming. But it’s the capacity you should be interested in—which is 46 oz.



So pick you pie plate, then adjust your filling to the pie plate capacity, not the stated inches.



Some fillings like peach and apple are typically domed above the rim; custard pies are not. So just because a plate capacity is 32 oz doesn’t mean you make that much filling. Knowing the capacity of the plate and adjusting your quantities accordingly is key to cost and waste control in production.



General guidelines for pie dough is 560g dough for a 10” double crust. If making multiple or daily batches, you can roll in up to 10% of scraps into the next batch of dough.



Also consider a vacuum sealer. Most filling will freeze well, so you can freeze leftover. Even if you don’t use it in a pie you sell, you can certainly use it for a pie for yourself.



Since it sounds like you make a lot of pie, you can also keep small dough rounds frozen. Any extra filling can be turned into hand pies. You can re-even refreeze unbaked handpies as long as then do not sit out long during the making.







examples of 10” with 32 oz and 26 oz capacity



https://www.foil-pans.com/collections/bakery-pans/products/10-foil-pie-pan-1-3-16-deep-50-pk





https://www.foil-pans.com/collectio...andi-foil-10-medium-foil-pie-pan-1-deep-50-pk





If you go up to 11” pan, the inside top dimension is actually closer to 10”. The capacity is a 46 oz



https://www.foil-pans.com/collectio...1-extra-deep-foil-pie-pan-1-13-32-deep-100-pk
 
Joined
Jul 23, 2020
Messages
2
Reaction score
0
The problem is I don’t make a lot of pies - just specific ones people ask for once in a while, especially during the holidays. And I don’t eat any of it (gluten free, sugar free & low carb diet), so leftovers don’t get eaten. So, I try to be efficient. Rather than changing all my recipes, I’ll try out the 11”. Thanks for the website!
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,579
Reaction score
1,294
The problem is I don’t make a lot of pies - just specific ones people ask for once in a while, especially during the holidays. And I don’t eat any of it (gluten free, sugar free & low carb diet), so leftovers don’t get eaten. So, I try to be efficient. Rather than changing all my recipes, I’ll try out the 11”. Thanks for the website!
I’m gluten-free as well, I don’t eat anything I bake, I get that. But if you bake by metric weight (baker’s percentages) which is the correct way to bake, it allows you to scale. That’s the reason baker’s percentages is used in commercial production, to scale to production as demand changes during the week.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jan 12, 2020
Messages
382
Reaction score
58
I can never for the life of me find disposable aluminum pie pans that are actually 10"x2", like all my pie pans at home. This means that when I make pies for friends, I always have to overstuff them or throw away some of the filling. This is especially frustrating when I sell them. Has anyone else had this issue? Or, does anyone know where to source disposable deep dish pie pans?
HFA 305-35-200 is a 10" foil pan, 39c each.
Nice pans, I bought a few at the store.
You can mail order them.

 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top