2" cake pan vs 3" deep cake pan


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Do I need a 3" cake pan? Not today but maybe tomorrow so why not buy a 3" deep one and fill it with less batter to make a 2" deep cake?

I am going to guess it is because the top will not bake evenly but need more than a guess.

thank you
:)
 
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Do I need a 3" cake pan? Not today but maybe tomorrow so why not buy a 3" deep one and fill it with less batter to make a 2" deep cake?

I am going to guess it is because the top will not bake evenly but need more than a guess.

thank you
:)
There‘s no reason other than aesthetics—the desire for a tall tier. To bake a cake evenly and level, you must control the temperature around the cake batter. So use a light color metal cake pan. Do NOT use coated metal or anodized aluminum. Use a wet cloth baking strip around the cake pan. Bake at 325°F (160°C).
 
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Thank you.....right now I was having issues finding a 3" deep pan so am sticking with the a couple small 2" ones and will wait for the 3" ones to come in. Sometimes I will want to bake a shorter cake in the 3" one......so I figure why buy 2 different pans.

As far as anodized goes.....I have small Fat Daddios and they do fine though for larger stuff I have baking strips on order.
I like them mainly because they leech less. I also use glassware and stoneware for some baking.
Will be experimenting.
 
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Thank you.....right now I was having issues finding a 3" deep pan so am sticking with the a couple small 2" ones and will wait for the 3" ones to come in. Sometimes I will want to bake a shorter cake in the 3" one......so I figure why buy 2 different pans.

As far as anodized goes.....I have small Fat Daddios and they do fine though for larger stuff I have baking strips on order.
I like them mainly because they leach less. I also use glassware and stoneware for some baking.
Will be experimenting.
 
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A Fat Daddio pan will dry out your cake and form a dry thick crust all around the cake.

Uncoated metal, the correct temperature and baking strips will ensure the cake does not dry out, no crust will form around the bottom and the sides of the cake. The expose top will still form crust, but it will not be a dried out crust and can be easily removed. The cake will still remain moist.


these two cakes came from the same batch of batter, they were both baked at the same time, in the same oven. The only difference is one cake was baked in a Chicago metallic cake pan and the other was baked in a Fat Daddio pan. The dried out cake that is brown all over was baked in a Fat Daddio pan. A lot of bakers end up soaking their cake with simple syrup because their cakes are all dried out. My cakes are never dried out. If I use a simple syrup it’s add complexity in flavors to the cake. Not because I have a dried up crusty brown cake.

F7AF311F-3A18-4540-A8F2-8E904726AC51.jpeg


This cake came out of the oven with light sided and bottom like this—soft delicate crumb without a disgusting dried out brown crust. Look at the difference in the texture between this and the Fat Daddio cake. This is the SAME batter. The metal used to make the cake pan makes a significant difference in the quality of the cake

232D82CF-3143-4466-8432-D3952C03CD45.jpeg


When the cake is sliced and plated it makes a difference as well. There’s no disgusting brown crust lines marring the layer.
43D8F18D-CADF-4FFD-9039-727B0E2FC719.jpeg
 
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Thank you. I will work on seeing if I can replicate with what I have. Not even the top of your cake has a browning.
Baking strips and perhaps.....so many ways to bake.
Being a determined guy I may go through a lot of flour :)
 
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Thank you. I will work on seeing if I can replicate with what I have. Not even the top of your cake has a browning.
Baking strips and perhaps.....so many ways to bake.
Being a determined guy I may go through a lot of flour :)
The top of my cake does brown because it is exposed to the hot oven air. But because the cake bakes slow and cool, all the moisture doesn’t evaporate. So the top crust is soft. After my cake is completely cool, usually the following day, I use a paring knife to gently scrape up the top crust. It lifts right off because the cake is not dry. Fat Daddio pans bake so hot you need to reduce the baking temperature a good 25°F minimum as a general rule to start with. But the cake I baked in the Fat Daddio pan was baked at 325°F which is pretty low. So yes, do some experimenting. And I always recommend baking strips. They work wonders. You can make some with alumium foil and wet paper towels if you don’t want to buy them.

Preppy Kitchen baker even uses Fat Daddio cake pans. While his cakes aren’t as light as mine, they are at least level and softer than most because he uses baking strips.

 

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