Autolyse and disaster

Discussion in 'Bread' started by Aspringer, May 29, 2018.

  1. Aspringer

    Aspringer New Member

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    I'm trying to bake a white bread from Ken Forkish’s book. In 3 tries now I’m not having good results. I’m measuring my ingredients by scale, I check the temp of the dough, I fold - I do everything exactly as the recipe says.
    In my 3 tries after 12 hours of proofing I have a risen, wet, sticky dough that is so sticky and loose it can not be handled. Attempting to shape this liquid goop into a ball is not possible.
    What am I doing wrong?
    And some questions:
    Can I use a proof oven with autolyse doughs?
    Do I have to proof the dough in round containers? I used a square plastic 14 qt lidded box.
    Much thanks to anyone that can offer suggestions. I’ve onoy been baking bread for 1 month. The “normal” breads I’m getting quite good at. But this wet stuff is beyond me. If I could figure out what I am doing wrong, I could change it. Right now I’m clueless.
     
    Aspringer, May 29, 2018
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  2. Aspringer

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum :)

    I'm sorry to say that I don't have any personal experience with autolyse doughs, although I've read a bit about it. The absorbency of flour can vary enormously, so maybe you didn't need to use quite so much water? Often the amount of water given in a bread recipe is more of a guide, and the amount you actually need will depend on a number of factors.

    @Norcalbaker59 might be able to help here.

    What is your background with baking?
     
    Becky, May 29, 2018
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  3. Aspringer

    Aspringer New Member

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    Thank you for the welcome and the possibility of too much water.
    I am a “darn, I am bored today” so I think I’ll try baking bread, Baker. I Started off with white loafs, experimented with adding minced garlic and other things and mostly had good results. Since that first sorta successful loaf three weeks ago, I have baked at least one loaf a day. I don’t know if that means I’m still bored, or if it means I really like baking bread.
    At this moment I am working on a loaf of cinnamon bread. Cross your fingers for me as this is my first cinnamon loaf.
     
    Aspringer, May 29, 2018
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  4. Aspringer

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Hello, welcome.

    First off if it’s a Forkish recipe it’s most likely a high hydration dough, meaning there’s a high ratio of water to flour. So the dough will be very wet. High hydration doughs are for the advanced bakers given the challenges in handling and shaping.

    I may be able to help you if you provide the recipe, the method, and very importantly the type and brand of yeast and flour you used. Flour is not created equal. Protein content varies by brand. Both protein and flour treatments (bleached, unbleached, malted) effect absorption rates. So knowing brand is very helpful in troubleshooting.

    Type and amount of yeast is important also as some yeasts are ill-suited from long fermentation.

    It may take a few days for me to get back to you as I’m working on two projects with deadlines this weekend
     
    Norcalbaker59, May 29, 2018
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