Baked yeast donut disaster

Discussion in 'Bread' started by acgraves16, Aug 14, 2019.

  1. acgraves16

    acgraves16 New Member

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    hi everyone! Noob in the forum here, but a fairly experienced scratch home baker (about 7 years).

    Recently I decided to try a new thing for me, yeast donuts. I’ve been successful with cake donuts many times but I wanted to recreate Boston creme donuts at home. I found a few recipes online and followed the directions to the letter. I’ve worked with yeast many times baking bread and rolls, so I thought this might be familiar...

    However, each time I’ve baked these donuts after letting the dough rise twice (once for an hour and then 30-40 mins after cutting), they come out dense, and don’t rise nearly enough to be called donuts. I’d call them biscuits. :) They’re tasty! But they’re not donuts.

    Any seasoned bakers have any clue what I’m doing wrong here? When I knead the dough it’s with my stand mixer/dough hook, and when rolling/cutting I use oil to grease the work surface rather than additional flour. I appreciate any and all feedback and I’ve failed 4 times... But I’m gonna keep trying!! Thanks in advance everyone.
     
    acgraves16, Aug 14, 2019
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  2. acgraves16

    acgraves16 New Member

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    Here is a pic of the product... :)
     

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    acgraves16, Aug 14, 2019
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  3. acgraves16

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Hello, welcome to the forum. Boston cream donuts are fried not baked. In fact, commercially made yeast donuts are always fried not baked. Baking turns the donut into a lead weight. If you want that light airy texture then you will need to fry the donut.

    People bake donuts believing a baked donut is “healthy.” But the truth is all purpose flour, sugar, chocolate glaze, and custard filling have no nutritional value whether you bake or fry the donut. It’s a donut, there’s nothing healthful about donuts. Donuts are meant to be treats, to be eaten on occasion, in moderation. So I believe that a donut should be made in the traditional way, fried, and enjoyed in all its glory. :D To get the light airy texture frying is a must.

    Also I would recommend you stop kneading on oil . The purpose of kneading is to create a gluten network. Coating flour with fat prevents water absorption which prevents gluten development. When you oil your work surface you coat the flour in oil. That prevents the flour from properly absorbing the water from the egg. And that in turn effects proper gluten development as you knead.

    I’ve used this recipe several times with excellent results.

    https://www.christinascucina.com/perfect-yeast-doughnuts-sugar-filled-jam-nutella-cream/
     
    Norcalbaker59, Aug 15, 2019
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  4. acgraves16

    acgraves16 New Member

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    Thank you SO much this is extremely helpful!! I was also inspired by your fried donut speech! :) Seriously the only reason I thought I’d try it baked was for my hubby, but I think he’ll agree if I posit this to him. ;)

    But the advice on the oil is fantastic. I had never considered the water from the egg, I was just trying to avoid excess flour. But now I’ll try it the traditional way. I knew I’d probably find someone who has more extensive knowledge about gluten development and yeast than I. I’ll give the recipe you suggested a shot, too! Try, try again...

    Thank you again so much!!
     
    acgraves16, Aug 15, 2019
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  5. acgraves16

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    You’re welcome. Hope they come out well. I used this recipe three times with good results.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Aug 19, 2019 at 7:45 PM
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