Can I Substitute Margarine for Butter in a Choux Pastry?


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Hello, I am new to baking and wanted to try profiteroles. However, I cannot eat dairy products (including butter). Is there a good substitute for butter (such as margarine/shortening, canola oil, coconut oil, etc.) for a choux pastry or should I try a different dessert?
Thanks!
 
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Hello, I am new to baking and wanted to try profiteroles. However, I cannot eat dairy products (including butter). Is there a good substitute for butter (such as margarine/shortening, canola oil, coconut oil, etc.) for a choux pastry or should I try a different dessert?
Thanks!
It won’t be the same. Just look for vegan pate a choux recipes.
 
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Hello, I am new to baking and wanted to try profiteroles. However, I cannot eat dairy products (including butter). Is there a good substitute for butter (such as margarine/shortening, canola oil, coconut oil, etc.) for a choux pastry or should I try a different dessert?
Thanks!
Bakers have been using marg for 75 years with no problem.
I never worked in a french bakery that used butter or milk in choux paste.
You can use oil but the shells will always be soft, some bakers prefer that.
Try to find baking margarine, not the spread slop.
If you can't find any baking marg just use crisco veg shortening.
 
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Bakers have been using marg for 75 years with no problem.
I never worked in a french bakery that used butter or milk in choux paste.
You can use oil but the shells will always be soft, some bakers prefer that.
Try to find baking margarine, not the spread slop.
If you can't find any baking marg just use crisco veg shortening.
I think stating honestly the differences in quality when making substitutions should always be stated. There is a marked difference in the dough when margarine is substituted. The loss of flavor is quite noticeable, and the texture is different.

Margarine made for commercial baking is also different from margarine made for retail consumption. The commercial baking margarine is tempered to give it a more plasticity so it will perform in applications like puff pastry. Retail margarine isn’t tempered in the same way. It’s not designed for baking. There are some margarines on the retail market that are labeled for baking; those are tempered for more plasticity.
 
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All right, I'll see if I can find commercial margarine at a specialty store. Thanks again for your insight!
 

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