Chocolate tempering

Discussion in 'Desserts' started by modelcake, Dec 21, 2017.

  1. modelcake

    modelcake Member

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    hello,
    what would be the best way to temper chocolate (for every kind of chocolate) so it wouldn't crystallized so quick (or at all)? what kind of choclate would be the best to use ?
    thank you :)
     
    modelcake, Dec 21, 2017
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  2. modelcake

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    The easiest method for tempering chocolate is the seeding method. See link below.

    I was taught the stovetop seeding method in pastry classes, so I’m only comfortable using that method. I use an actual double boiler; the fit is tight to keep steam at a minimum. But I’ve done the large bowl set over a pot in classes with not problem.

    I’ve never melted chocolate in the microwave, so I have no thoughts on that method.

    A chocolate does not have to be couverture to temper. But it needs to be real chocolate rather than compound chocolate or candy melts. Compound chocolates are any chocolate chips.

    I don’t know where you’re located, so I don’t know if the brands I use are available in your area. I’m on the West Coast of the US. These are the grocery store brands I use: TCHO and Guittard.

    Both brands reliably temper with the seeding method. I always temper at least 1/2 pound of chocolate as less can produce varied results.

    TCHO 66% semisweet available at Whole Foods $7

    Guittard 66% semisweet available Target, Whole Foods $7 - $8. At speciality stores this bag sells for $12.


    Professional quality brands are available during holiday season at Whole Foods or most of the year through specialty restaurant supply and cake decorating supply stores.

    Callebaut starting at $10/lbs. I like the flavor of Callebaut, but I find it can be difficult to temper. So it’s not my first choice.


    Valrhona starting at $15/lbs for white chocolate; dark at $20/lbs. Tempers very well.

    Valrhona is an excellent chocolate. But most of their dark chocolate is 70% or above. I’ve found that’s an acquired taste. In my taste tests I’ve found most people prefer chocolate between 55% - 66%. So I only use Valrhona dark chocolate when I know it is the preference of the recipient.

    When it comes to white chocolate for ganache, it’s Valrhona or nothing for me.

    Another excellent brand is Cacao Barry which is Callebaut’s top line. It tempers beautifully and tastes great so it’s a favorite among pastry chefs. But it’s only available through trade sources and packed accordingly in bulk. They label their packages with images of chocolate drops. The number of drops indicates the viscosity of the melted chocolate. Two drops is decent, but three drops is the best all round. Above three drops is for the experienced chocolatier.

    There are general charts on the temperature for the various types of chocolate. White and milk chocolate are tempered at a lower temperature than dark chocolate. But temperatures can vary by brand. So whatever brand you purchase, check the brand’s website for their recommended tempering temperature.


    https://www.kingarthurflour.com/learn/tempering-chocolate/

    Packaging of the chocolates I have in my pantry that I will temper for chocolate dipped biscotti, dipped soft chewy caramels, and a cake collar.
    4747CDC1-4DB8-4EDC-9F9F-2267EE77A10F.jpeg

    TCHO
    E2848111-9523-4433-A08A-580841773127.jpeg

    Guittard
    4F0D0433-16B7-4322-A1C9-BDC478A5AD9C.jpeg

    Chocolate transfer sheets I’ll use for a white chocolate cake collar on my Christmas cake. Chocolate transfer sheets are a great way to a professional look to chocolate decorations A2CF4879-494B-48D9-9877-6EBBB8A924CD.jpeg

    THIS IS TCHO UNSWEETENED DO NOT USE THIS FOR TEMPERING!
    401350EC-BE08-44B9-89FA-3C8A3B7D1E63.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Dec 21, 2017
    Norcalbaker59, Dec 21, 2017
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    modelcake and Ian like this.
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  3. modelcake

    modelcake Member

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    Thank you so much for your elaborated explanation!! you are amazing! i learn so much from you.
    in the past i did try the ben marie methood (large bowl over boiling water) and it worked great but it did got crystalized after a while...
     
    modelcake, Dec 24, 2017
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  4. modelcake

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    I’m glad to be of help. I really enjoy baking and the science behind it.

    After chocolate is tempered, it needs to stay in working temperature to keep it tempered. These are the general working temperatures.
    • Dark chocolate working temperature 88 – 89° F (31° C)
    • Milk and white chocolates working temperature 84 – 86° F (29 – 30° C)
    • Do not reheat tempered chocolate above 90° (30° C) or let if fall more than a degree or two below the working temperature.
    To keep chocolate in working temperature without a temper machine, I keep the pot of water warm on the stove top with the burner at the absolute lowest setting. Every few minutes I check the temperature. If the temperature is nearing 86°F (30° C), I reheat over the water pot. It’s important to stir often while working with chocolate. And when reheating stir constantly.

    Some people place a heating heating pad under the bowl to keep it in working temperature. But I always worry it might increase the temperature beyond 90° (30° C). So I prefer to monitor the temperature while I am working with it, then reheated over the warm water.

    If I worked with chocolate more regularly, I’d purchase a chocolate tempering machine. But I can’t justify paying $400 for a machine I might use eve but I can’t justify paying $400 for a machine that would get used at most six times a year once every other month.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Dec 24, 2017
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  5. modelcake

    modelcake Member

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    you are absolutely right!
    ok. so just to be on the safe side so i know i got it right- i basicly melt the choclate (each to it's proper temperature) and once i get it i keep it on the hot pot making sure it doesn't go over its temperature?
    am i right?
    what should i do once i got it to the right temperature? how do i keep it from crystallyzing after molding with it? what would be the proper storage for it? and where?
    sorry for all the questions but i really want to do it right- after doing different experiments without getting the right result i am wondering what should i do different ....
    thanks again for your time and your knowledge- i really do appreciate it :)
     
    modelcake, Dec 25, 2017
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  6. modelcake

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Do not leave the chocolate on the pot of water. Keep the pot on the ready so you can rewarm as needed. To rewarm, just set the chocolate over the pot for 10 seconds or less stirring constantly. I tempered a couple of pounds of chocolate yesterday. I had to reheat a number of times before I was finished with all my chocolate projects.

    Tempered chocolate cools in about 5 minutes. Once I reach working temperature, I work about three minutes, then check the temperature. If you work within 3 - 4 minute blocks, I make sure I have everything set up before I melt the chocolate. I also make sure the set up is based on my workflow steps. That way I can work as quickly as possible

    Store in air tight container. Ideal temperature 55° – 70°. Low humidity, ideally not over 65%.

    There’s two types of bloom:

    Fat Bloom: caused by exposure to high heat or cold. Fat bloom is the most issue. While it doesn’t affect taste, it is unslightly. To prevent fat bloom, try to store chocolate as close to 55° – 70°.

    Sugar Bloom: caused by exposure to high humidity or dampness. To prevent sugar bloom, store chocolate in air tight container.

    Also, avoid tempering chocolate in on high humidity days. If the relative humidity is over 60% it becomes much more difficult to temper chocolate. Once relative humidity is 65% or above you won’t be able to temper chocolate. So if you live in a high humidity region you can try a dehumidifier.

    If you are working with a large batch (2 lbs or more) you can add one percent of pure cocoa butter to the chocolate. It definitely helps with the viscidity. I’ve only done it once in a class. I recently purchased some pure cocoa butter to try it again at home. You just have to be careful not to add too much cocoa butter as it will change how it sets

    When seeding make sure you reserve a sufficient amount of unmelted chocolate to seed with. Are use 25 to 30 percent for seeding.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Dec 26, 2017
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