Croissant dough


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Hello,
If you are working with croissant dough and want a tighter crumb what would you do? Do you slightly underproof the dough?

Carl
 
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Yeh that would do it but would make it a bit chewy or heavy.
You can get a tight dough by not leaving it overnite to fully relax.
Complete the folding process and roll it out after 3 hours.
 
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There’s really no way to get a great croissant without a sheeter



But if you’re going to make it at home, this is one of the best tutorials out there.









https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/classic-french-croissant-recipe/



The video





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/



FAQ





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/facq-frequently-asked-croissant-questions/



They also have a One Day Version, but I would strongly recommend you do the traditional version first
 
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There’s really no way to get a great croissant without a sheeter
What came first, the croissant or the sheeter?
Same with refrigeration, my boss worked at Poilane when they had no refrigerators, it can be done because thats the way it was done.
I used to make 1000 a day on weekends without a sheeter, it can't be done with the french rolling pin.
The sheeter made it fast and easier but not better.
 
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What came first, the croissant or the sheeter?
Same with refrigeration, my boss worked at Poilane when they had no refrigerators, it can be done because thats the way it was done.
I used to make 1000 a day on weekends without a sheeter, it can't be done with the french rolling pin.
The sheeter made it fast and easier but not better.
Just because the dough was invented before sheeter does it mean the The handmade dough is superior. When you roll dough by hand you cannot apply exacting and uniform pressure. A machine can. Technology is in some cases far superior to what a human can do.
 
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I found no difference except time and ease.
Superior in efficiency yes definitely.

You'd be surprised what the human hand can do, lathe beds that rely on accuracy down to thousands of an inch are hand finished by hand lapping and scraping, this is after they are machined by the best CNC computer controlled horizontal mills.
 
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I found no difference except time and ease.
Superior in efficiency yes definitely.

You'd be surprised what the human hand can do, lathe beds that rely on accuracy down to thousands of an inch are hand finished by hand lapping and scraping, this is after they are machined by the best CNC computer controlled horizontal mills.
well you know I’ve eaten a lot of really crappy croissants in my life, so I am very surprised at what the human hand can do and still ccroissant.

Even my own croissants are crap. There’s really no comparing a croissant made by a master baker using a sheeter and made by hand. I was just taking a lamination class. Try to laminate without any extra flour on the counter. Yeah the instructor wouldn’t even allow us to have a bowl of flour on the counter. He’s a master baker. He can laminate those with out any extra flour on the counter. i’ll go ahead and you try that
 
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I owned a rondo 3 phase sheeter for 30 years, I know what it can do.
I bet the your sheeter dough is better than your hand dough. There is no way you can be exacting in pressure by hand as a machine. there is just no way. A human cannot roll with the same precision as a machine.
 
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There’s really no way to get a great croissant without a sheeter



But if you’re going to make it at home, this is one of the best tutorials out there.









https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/classic-french-croissant-recipe/



The video





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/



FAQ





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/facq-frequently-asked-croissant-questions/



They also have a One Day Version, but I would strongly recommend you do the traditional version first
Hello!

I hope you’re well.

The recipe you posted requires instant yeast is that ok? Fast action yeast. Also, it says to use french flour but I’m an in the U.K., would you happen to know the best type of flour to use if you’re here?

Manyy thanks!
 
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There’s really no way to get a great croissant without a sheeter



But if you’re going to make it at home, this is one of the best tutorials out there.









https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/classic-french-croissant-recipe/



The video





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/



FAQ





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/facq-frequently-asked-croissant-questions/



They also have a One Day Version, but I would strongly recommend you do the traditional version first
It suggests plain flour but this has a low protein content compared with strong white flour so would the latter be a better choice?
 
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There’s really no way to get a great croissant without a sheeter



But if you’re going to make it at home, this is one of the best tutorials out there.









https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/classic-french-croissant-recipe/



The video





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/video-making-baking-classic-french-croissants/



FAQ





https://www.weekendbakery.com/posts/facq-frequently-asked-croissant-questions/



They also have a One Day Version, but I would strongly recommend you do the traditional version first

 
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look at the inside of her croissant. See how tight the inside looks, a bunch of tiny holes? She fused her layers. The structure should be open. The tiny holes means she rolled too hard. Made too many passes, overheated the dough, stretched the dough. The butter also shattered between the layers.

Now look at the inside of the croissant from the Weekend Bakery and Buttermilk Pantry blogs. Those are far better croissants. The open honeycomb structure means the layers weren’t fused. The butter rolled out between the layers and did not shatter.




 
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Oh ok wow I’m surprised by that! See how naive the home bakers eye is, I definitely need to take some classes because this is information that you just don’t find online and on YouTube.

I did made them prior to seeing your post. I had a few issues with mine that are nothing to do with this ladies explanation or recipe.

Firstly, the croissant is MINIMALLY flakey which is super frustrating. Basically when I proofed the dough after folding into croissant shapes, I proofed it in the oven covered in plastic with hot water and the oven was too warm. The butter almost completely seeped out of the croissant. I’m not sure if the ‘wetness’ would have prevented a crust forming and if a kind of macaron technique would have been better employed in this instance. You know leaving the croissants uncovered with just a light light egg wash so that they are able to from a crust before baking?

What effect would the melting of the butter have had on the actual crust formation and the interior of the croissant?

Also, the croissant didn’t have that almost ‘rough’ texture, you know where you’re tearing the croissant apart and there is an almost elastic resistance until you eat it and it melts in your mouth.

Any advice regarding this would be greatly appreciated!

Thanks

Lamya
 

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You’re dough is completely fused. To be honest I didn’t look at the video you posted because I took one look at that inside of her croissant and I knew the baker did not know how to laminate dough. If she cannot properly laminate dough, she can’t possibly teach anyone else how to do it properly.

The baker knows how to laminate dough. The Weekend Bakery is a very good recipe. I’ve use that recipe, so I know firsthand that it’s a reliable recipe.

I would recommend that you use that recipe. And review the video from the Buttermilk Pantry as well. Those two bakers know how to laminate dough. The processes they use are also how I’ve been taught for lamination for home application.

Do not cover your croissants when they are proofing in a make-shift proofer. The only time you want to cover shaped dough is when it’s on the counter and the room temperature is going to be on the chiller your side.

Bagging a tin or a tray of shaped dough create a micro climate inside. And that’s fine if it’s going to sit in a open environment. But when you use your oven as a proofer you do not want to bag your shaped doughs. The oven is a small environment. The oven is insulated. And if the oven light is on it generates a significant amount of heat. Bagging will simply overheat everything.
 
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What do you mean by completely fused? Not enough holes? Also, what is it that causes this? I’m assuming from your previous posts though that lamination is a topic in and of itself and not so simple to summarise...

any idea why the outside didn’t flake?
 
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Ah ok I see from your post above that there are a lot of reasons why this happens!
 
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In school we had a sheeter, but we were required to do the full lamination process by hand (we used the sheeter only before the final shaping--and had to do that by hand at times when the sheeter was in repair). A sheeter definitely makes it faster and easier--my first 16 months out of school I did only croissants--but with practice you can get great results with hand lamination. I don't enjoy doing it at home so much; I think having a big workbench and rolling pin (and walk-in fridge and proofbox!) helps a lot.
 

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