Doughnut help


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Attached is pictures of the same doughnut. It only seems like half of the doughnut is proofing properly. I am looking for the full mid riff band. Does anyone know whats going on?
 

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I’ve discussed doughnuts on several threads here. I don’t have time to get into detail. You can look at a troubleshooting I guide posted, look up a thread in which I talked about Desired Dough Temperature (DDT). DDT is the most important aspect in baking, yet one that novice bakers don’t know about

https://www.baking-forums.com/threads/doughnut-troubleshooting-guide.6529/

This is the tread that I discuss DDT

https://www.baking-forums.com/threads/tears-in-dough.606-41931
I appreciate the response. I was also wondering how would you control the temp of liquid when the packet of yeast says to bloom at 100-110f. Also due to quarantine I've been making doughnuts like mad. In one of your guides I see it says, "up to 20% scrap dough." At what point would you add it into the mix? Thank you for your time again.
 
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I appreciate the response. I was also wondering how would you control the temp of liquid when the packet of yeast says to bloom at 100-110f. Also due to quarantine I've been making doughnuts like mad. In one of your guides I see it says, "up to 20% scrap dough." At what point would you add it into the mix? Thank you for your time again.

The whole of DDT is to control the temperature of the finished dough. When you use 110°F water you’re out of DDT.

Every commercial bakery in the country calculates DDT every single day based on room temperature, flour temperature, pre-ferment temperature, friction factor, and water temperature.

You have to calculate the temperature of the water. Don’t just follow some generic instructions on the package. The package is wrong. I don’t care if it’s coming from the manufacture, it is the wrong way to make yeast dough.

You need to control the finished temperature of the dough after you finish mixing. This is called Desired Dough Temperature or DDT.

By adjusting the temperature of the water/liquid you can control the finished temperature of your mixed dough.



DDT is typically 75°F (24°C) – 82°F (28°C).


Total Temperature Factors (TTF) are the things that add temperature to the dough that is NOT liquid. You need to think of temperature as an ingredient. TTF are those things that add temperature. Friction in mixing adds temperature. So think of friction as an ingredient. Friction generates heat, so you add friction heat every time you mix. So you add temperature every time you mix. Water can be hot or cold. So you add temperature every time you add water.


The water temperature is equal to (DDT x number of TTF) - (the sum of the TTF)



Total Temperature Factors (TTF)

  • Room temperature
  • Flour
  • Preferment (e.g., the poolish in the Berliner doughnuts)
  • Friction Factor (mixer or hand kneading)

DDT: 75°F —this is the temperature you want your doughnut dough to be after mix



  • Room temp 75°F
  • Preferment temp 0°F
  • Flour temp 70°F
  • Friction factor 22°F (see frictions estimates for mixing below)

If the recipe does not have a preferment, just use 3 factors


Required water temperature = (DDT x 3 factors) - (room temp + preferment temp + flour temp + friction factor)



58°F = (75°F x 3) - (75°F + 0°F + 70°F + 22°F)



There’s three steps
  • Step 1: Multiply the Desired Dough Temperature (DDT) by Total Temperature Factors (TTF) (either 3 or 4)

(75 x 3 = 225) - (75 + 0 + 70 + 22 = 167)

  • Step 2: add temperatures of all the TTF’s

(75 x 3 = 225) - (75 + 0 + 70 + 22 = 167)

  • Step 3: subtract the sum of factors from TTF
225 - 167 = 58


This is the temperature of the water (or liquid) to use: 58°F


Now do you understand that you ignore the yeast package, and calculate the temperature of the water to bloom the yeast and any other liquid you use in the recipe?

=========================================

Friction Factor Estimates - these are the Temperatures to use for friction. So if you have a home stand mixer use 22°F-24°F. If you’re mixing by hand use 6°F-8°F.

  • 22°F -24°F for mixing in home stand mixer (not a commercial mixer)
  • 6°F-8°F hand kneading gentle folds
  • 0-4°F stretch and fold
 

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