Egg sizes


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Hi everyone this is my first post.
I have eggs delivered from a farm and they are jumbo size approx between 85 and 94 gms per egg (in their shell) and they are all double yolks.
I am a keen Baker but am reluctant to experiment too much when a recipe says 2 large eggs as my eggs would make the mixture too wet.
With a Victoria sandwich mix I would weigh the eggs in their shell and use the same amount of flour butter and sugar, however in other cake mixtures I am unsure how much egg to use without the recipe going wrong.
Any advice on how to adapt recipes to use jumbo double yolk eggs?
 
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Recipes are based on baker’s percentage, ratio of ingredients are ALL weighed against the flour. The exception to this is the home bakers in America who persist in using volume measurements (cups and spoons) which is a measure of space, so
absolutely nothing I write in this forum ever applies to the volume measurement unless I specifically state otherwise.

And as long as you’re in the UK and using metric weight you can adapt your jumbo eggs to a recipe by calculating the weight of the egg whites and yolk per large egg.

Commercially produced eggs must meet a MINIMUM size to be included in a grade.

NOTE: Egg grade in Canada and the United States is different from that in Europe. So recipes developed by bakers/cooks in these countries will based on the appropriate egg grade (size).

Most recipes are based on a “large“ egg.

Since, eggs in Europe are graded larger, a “large” egg in Canada and US is equivalent to a medium egg in Europe.

So be aware of where your recipe was developed!!!

A large egg in Europe is a 63g - 73g in the shell. The shell will weight about 8g.

So let’s say the average large egg is 68g. Less 8g for shell, there is 60g raw egg.

The yolk weighs about 38% of the large raw egg.

60g raw egg x .38 yolk weight = 22.8. (round up 23g)

So for every large egg in the recipe, use:

37g egg white and 23 g yolk per large egg

It doesn’t matter that you have double yolks. Just separate the yolks and whites. Then weigh out the amount of whites and yolks you need.

It is in fact common for eggs to be separated in the bakery. And eggs are always weighed in commercial baking.


====================

Weight in the shell

United States
SizeMinimum mass per egg
Jumbo70.9 g2.5 oz
Extra-Large (XL)63.8 g2.25 oz.
Large (L)56.7 g2 oz.
Medium (M)49.6 g1.75 oz.
Small (S)42.5 g1.5 oz.
Peewee35.4 g1.25 oz.
Canada
SizeMinimum mass per egg
Jumbo70 g
Extra Large63 g
Large56 g
Medium49 g
Europe
SizeMinimum mass per egg
Extra large (XL)73 g
Large (L)63 g
Medium (M)53 g
Small (S)Less than 53 g
 
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Thank you for your reply and full details. I suppose a simpler way would be to cracks the eggs and measure out approx 60gm of whisked egg to a recipe which is asking for 1 large egg? 120gm for 2 large eggs andx180gm for 3 large eggs and so on. My eggs appear to be the size of 1½ large eggs so would probably use 2 jumbo eggs for a recipe asking for 3 large eggs.

Does this sound correct?
 
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Thank you for your reply and full details. I suppose a simpler way would be to cracks the eggs and measure out approx 60gm of whisked egg to a recipe which is asking for 1 large egg? 120gm for 2 large eggs andx180gm for 3 large eggs and so on. My eggs appear to be the size of 1½ large eggs so would probably use 2 jumbo eggs for a recipe asking for 3 large eggs.

Does this sound correct?

No you cannot just whisk the eggs and weigh out 60g per large egg if you have double yolks.

IF THERE ARE TWO YOLKS IT COMPLETELY CHANGES THE COMPOSITION OF FAT, WATER, AND PROTEIN!!

The protein is a binder. The fat in the yolk adds richness and moisture. Water in the egg white turns to steam and rising. if you have too much protein the cake will be tough. If you don’t have enough egg white you will not have enough steam, The cake will not rise enough. If you have too much fat, the cake will gummy/rubbery.


Eggs:

Yolks: expand to 4x original volume when whipped

Less foaming power than whites because they contain
  • 33% fat
  • 48% water
  • 17% protein
Factors in yolk that inhibit foaming
  • Less surface tension
  • more emulsifying lipids
  • more proteins that do not unfurl are stabilizing
  • less water
to whip, to 4x volume, heat with liquid and continuously whisk



Albumen (Egg white): expand 8x original volume because they contain
  • 0% fat
  • 88% water
  • 11% protein
Lower protein and high water content in egg white makes the protein less stable. High water content allows a whisk to easily drag across surface creating force to easily unfurl proteins.

Whole eggs: expand to 6x original volume because with both the yolk and egg white they are
  • 11% fat
  • 74% water
  • 13% protein
 
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I have just picked out a simple recipe and as I'm not a percentage expert, how would you adapt this recipe using jumbo eggs with double yolks, would you increase all the ingredients or just the flour.

 
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I already gave you a detailed explanation in my first response on how to convert your jumbo double yolk eggs to a per egg in a recipe that is based on metic weight. Just apply what what wrote.

I will say I doubt this is a very good recipe.

The water is not extracted from the carrots, which is standard procedure for carrot anything baked because of the high water content.

if muscovado is as expensive in the UK as it is in US, it’s a total waste of money in this application because it will get totally watered down and lost in the mix.

oil based cake oil unlike butter is 100% fat and used in place of butter to create a very moist, lighter and tall cake; to add dairy products, like yogurt, the cake will become dense and heavy—defeats the very purpose of an oil based cake. Might as well just make a butter cake.
 
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