Getting the measurements right


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I am a cook no questions asked. I am unafraid to try new things when it comes to my cooking. I feel like there is no meal which can't be fixed.

When it comes to baking, I am taking my beginners course right here. I have long heard it is important to get those measurements right. I have also heard that the dry ingredients and the liquid have different rules applied to them when baking. This link below confirms this. How are measuring up when it comes to your baking measurements?


http://www.foodservicewarehouse.com...rectly-measure-baking-ingredients/c27624.aspx
 
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I always sift my flour, as I sift it I pour it into a measuring cup. I have everything necessary to measure other things, like for example the spoon measurement. I always sift my flour, ALWAYS. I think this is a great link, by the way :) I have noticed that the right measurements are specially important when making a cake or a muffin mix. Now I just do my best, relax and have fun, hehe!
 
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I read it in some more detail yesterday and still have to revisit it from time to time. In my case I only own a plastic and and glass measuring cup. I've been around for a while but I would never have thought of owning a "dry graduating measuring cup" for measuring dry ingredients. Even now after reading the article it's not necessarily going on my shopping list. I might be curious to know they are available but I still feel for my level I am good with the ones I already own.

Still I found the information very useful. It's information I would consult from time to time.
 
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I don't necessary sift my flour; in fact, when I measure it in a cup I don't usually "scrape" off the extra anyway. I've always just done it "roughly" or by rough estimation and I have yet to run into any problems.

I would be doing it differently though if it was a completely new recipe that I haven't tried before at all. Maybe one of these days when I have time on my hands I'll try 2 batches: one with sifted flour and one without.
 
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Measurements are so important, especially when adding liquid and fats. If you try to scrimp on the fats then sometimes it doesn't work out and if you don't add enough liquid or too much then the consistency is all wrong. I add a little less at first and then the remainder of the liquid and a touch more if it feels it needs it.

Everyone has their own consistency they like. I like a thin batter for my pancakes and I told my friend to use the rest of my batter, but she likes it thick and tried to make a thick pancake from it, when it was the wrong consistency for that type of pancake. Goes to show, we all cook differently with the same ingredients.
 
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Can I cheat where the sugar is concerned? My husband complains if something is too sweet and that would be most things as he's doesn't use sugar for the most part. I should be right there with him considering my health issues. I was wondering if a recipe calls for a cup of sugar if I could reduce it to a half a cup and not affect the texture. Normally I check before I ask here. This time I will try the opposite approach:).
 
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Can I cheat where the sugar is concerned? My husband complains if something is too sweet and that would be most things as he's doesn't use sugar for the most part. I should be right there with him considering my health issues. I was wondering if a recipe calls for a cup of sugar if I could reduce it to a half a cup and not affect the texture. Normally I check before I ask here. This time I will try the opposite approach:).
Now with sugar you can cheat with, because that is more about taste, it doesn't affect the overall bake. I do this with my own cakes as I like to put chocolate buttons on top instead. You can taste the difference, but I never feel right about adding so much sugar to a cake. The only things important in cake is liquid, fats, and flour. If you don't add enough fat, it will be harder and less fluffy. I try to use a mixture of butter and oil and it does work.
 
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Thanks Mara but I couldn't wait. I had some bananas that were overly ripe and I decided to go try something. As fate would have it I stumbled on a simple (my second name in baking) recipe that actually said you can reduce the sugar amount to about half if you want to. I did not have to Google the sugar question.

Now I am here nervously waiting to see the outcome. The recipe called for baking soda and I had none so I searched to see how I could substitute it with baking powder and I was told I should triple the amount of baking powder.

As if I did not have enough excitement in the kitchen I baked in a glass dish for the first time and read I should reduce the temperature by 25. I am praying I don't have a disaster on my hand:).
 

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