Help to stop cakes sticking to tin


Norcalbaker59

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NorCal, I could kiss you square on the mouth for this one, but i don't think my computer screen would like that much... This was a godsend for the orders i had this past week! The only cakes that even remotely stuck to the pans were the ones i didn't use this concoction on. The rest flipped right out, no haggle! Even the intricate minis in the silicone pan popped right out!

What i did notice is that there was a little more of a crust on my cakes than usual. Did i use too much flour maybe? I measured equal amounts, but by weight, the flour would have been much lighter.

I'm so pleased to hear the baker's grease worked well. I swear by the stuff.

Regarding the crust development. I have not had that problem, so I'm not sure of the cause/remedies. The following is me thinking out loud.

Crust development is affected by several things: oven temperature, moisture, leavening, and density of batter.

Moisture: Your instinct about the flour percentage is good. The level of moisture both inside and around the cake affects crust development. Professional ovens are actually fitted with steamers to introduce ambient moisture during baking of my products. Since you do a modified box mix it's difficult to adjust the internal moisture. You could try reducing the flour in the baker's grease. Maybe try 60g shortening, 60g oil, 40g flour.

Oven temperature: the hotter the oven, the thicker the crust development. You could try reducing the temperature by about 15 to 20°. I wouldn't reduce the temperature much more than that as it wouldn't require an increase in baking time.

Leavening: less leavening creates a thicker crust. More leavening creates a thinner crust. In modifying the mix, if you are adding at least 1/2 cup of additional flour, you could try adding 1 teaspoon of baking powder. If you aren't adding additional flour, then you could try 1/4 - 1/2 teaspoon of baking powder.

Density of batter: you use quality pans so I don't think heat conduction is the issue.

So that's me thinking out loud. I don't know if any of these will resolve the problem, but could be worth a try.


BTW, I had a 25% discount coupon for William Sonoma, so I bought the mini Heritage bundt pan. I needed another cake pan like I need a hole in my head. But boy do I love that pan design!
 
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RedShoe

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I shall take these thoughts into consideration. I'll try dropping the temperature a couple ticks to see what happens.

Isn't Heritage BEAUTIFUL!?!?! I want that pan so badly! But $36 is a little rich for me right now. Business is picking up fantastically, so i may just make it a Christmas present to myself!
 

Norcalbaker59

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I shall take these thoughts into consideration. I'll try dropping the temperature a couple ticks to see what happens.

Isn't Heritage BEAUTIFUL!?!?! I want that pan so badly! But $36 is a little rich for me right now. Business is picking up fantastically, so i may just make it a Christmas present to myself!
Congrats on building a great cottage cake business. It's wonderful you are doing some thing you love.

Heritage is my favorite bundt cake design. It's so clean, modern, and elegant. The price made me hesitate. But with the coupon I decided to splurge and buy the heritage and a pullman bread pan that I've wanted forever.
 
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AuntJamelle

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Great tips on here!!! Making notes frantically!

A couple of small tips I can offer:

The cooking sprays that specifically say they have flour added work great for me!

When dusting a pan for chocolate cake you can use unsweetened cocoa powder instead of flour so that the color blends in when you take the cake out of the pan.

I use parchment paper to line cheesecake pans, both the bottoms and sides and I spray both the pan and the parchment with regular cooking spray too. As I'm fitting the "collar" of parchment around the sides I use wooden clothes pins to hold the pieces in place - just have to remove them before baking!

Bundt pans can be tricky! Either butter or cooking spray with flour have worked well for me though!
 

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