Help! ... Why do my rolls do this?

Discussion in 'Bread' started by amyhbass, May 16, 2018.

  1. amyhbass

    amyhbass New Member

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    Hi - I am brand new to the forum, but I think this is going to be so helpful! I sought you out because I need help with my rolls! This is a country buttermilk roll recipe from a bread machine book... They are awesome if I time everything just right, but - if I don't, and they go just a bit too far after when I should have baked them, they start to fall! I am attaching a picture. These were so pretty and rounded .. would have been nice and fluffy ... if I had only baked them a half hour or so earlier. But, no - these tasted great, but they were dense and not awesome. :oops:

    We sometimes get unbaked yeast rolls from Logan's Steakhouse, and I can actually keep those in the fridge for a couple of days with NO falling and no loss of that nice, fluffy texture when I get around to baking them.. So ... Why do the rolls that I make do this? FYI, they contain whole buttermilk, butter, honey, bread flour, baking soda, salt, and yeast. Should I just ditch this recipe and use another? They taste great, but perhaps too finicky for my unpredictable life. ;) Can you help me?

    upload_2018-5-15_18-4-57.png

    Ugh ... Thank you so much!

    - Amy
     
    amyhbass, May 16, 2018
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  2. amyhbass

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum. Yes, timing is everything with baking.

    Yeast doughs are unique in that yeast is a living organism. As such it must feed to stay alive. The yeast converts the flour starch to sugars for food. As it consumes the starch, it reproduces. After so many hours, the ever growing yeast exhausts it’s food supply. At that point, the yeast begins to die off. What you’re experiencing is the effects of too much yeast and no more food.

    You mentioned bread machine. Are you using a bread machine and bread machine yeast or Instant/Rapid rise yeast in the dough? These are a specific strains of yeast; bread machine yeast is for a different temperature range than other yeasts; instant/rapid rise yeast is a strain developed for rapid development. Neither yeast is designed for long fermentation. Manufacturers do not recommend the use of these yeasts for any extended fermentation.

    You can try to reduce the amount of yeast if you know you won’t be able to bake on time.

    But to be honest, when there’s going to be a long fermentation time, it’s best to use a recipe with Active Dry yeast. Active Dry yeast is a species that develops more slowly. I prefer as I like a slower controlled rise.
     
    Norcalbaker59, May 16, 2018
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  3. amyhbass

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum @amyhbass :) Good advice above, so I won't repeat it. It's worth noting that the amount of time it takes for dough to prove depends on a number of factors - the type of yeast you used, the temperature, the humidity, salt, etc. You have to pay close attention to the rising dough, rather than leave it for a specified period of time. The dough is ready when it has doubled in size, and if you prod it with your finger / knuckle an indent should remain (ie it shouldn't spring back fully).

    If the rolls were tasty then I wouldn't ditch the recipe!
     
    Becky, May 16, 2018
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  4. amyhbass

    amyhbass New Member

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    Hi - Thank you both for your input. I used Active Dry yeast, in a packet (fresh). I will just try to pay very close attention. Perhaps I will just go ahead and bake them and keep them warm if they're beginning to fall - that might be an improvement over the dense result after they fall.

    I'm curious ... I usually put a quart of hot water in the oven while the rolls are rising, but I forgot this time. How does increased humidity affect the rising?

    Thank you again! - Amy
     
    amyhbass, May 16, 2018
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    Norcalbaker59 likes this.
  5. amyhbass

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Active Dry yeast is not normally used in bread machines and not recommended by yeast manufacturers. So the problem may be the author of the bread machine cookbook created a faulty formula.

    Yes steam creates heat. Heat will
    cause rapid development of yeast. Once you shape dough for the final proof, you really cannot leave it in a warm environment to bake later. Dough that has completed a first rise, then shaped has to be baked when it’s fully proofed.

    If you wait until the dough looks like it’s collapsing, then your dough is already way over-proofed. The best gauge in determining when dough is ready to bake is the poke test.

    You can make the dough, then instead of letting it rise, immediately shape into rolls, then refrigerate overnight. Then bring to room temperature and rise. Then bake.

    You can freeze too, the thaw and rise to bake. But once dough had completed the first rise, it will need timely baking.

    For poke test, lghtly poke and compare to the pic below.

    72BA693F-047C-4FC1-A8FE-BAFEE0D4E1E9.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, May 16, 2018
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    Becky likes this.
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