HomeBaking Guidelines in NM


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So, I am wanting to start a homebaking business in NM only to find out that one of the requirements to do that is putting in a separate handwashing sink.

I find that guideline utterly ridiculous for a home business as I feel that:

1) It's a very costly expense
2) I feel it will lower the value of my house as I have a beautiful uncut 8' quartz island and do not want to spoil it's beauty.
3) Most homes do not have separate handwashing sinks.

If there are any homebakers from New Mexico, did you have to install a separate handwashing sink? Or did you have to rent a commercial kitchen?
 
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The state has a responsibility to keep people safe from food poisoning. Your hands have bacteria. When you wash your hands in a sink you simply transfer the bacteria from your hands into the sink.

If you don’t want to conform to your state’s regulations, consider renting hourly commercial kitchen space as needed in a shared commercial kitchen. The benefit of preparing your baked goods in a commercial kitchen is you are not restricted to the low AW foods and all the other restrictions. You’d be operating like a caterer; and you need a commercial license to work out of a commercial kitchen.

Normally you have to commit to renting the kitchen for a certain set number of hours per week/month.
 
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The state has a responsibility to keep people safe from food poisoning. Your hands have bacteria. When you wash your hands in a sink you simply transfer the bacteria from your hands into the sink.

If you don’t want to conform to your state’s regulations, consider renting hourly commercial kitchen space as needed in a shared commercial kitchen. The benefit of preparing your baked goods in a commercial kitchen is you are not restricted to the low AW foods and all the other restrictions. You’d be operating like a caterer; and you need a commercial license to work out of a commercial kitchen.

Normally you have to commit to renting the kitchen for a certain set number of hours per week/month.
That's what I was afraid of. I understand the reasoning the State has for it's guidelines but realistically putting in a separate handwashing sink is too extravagant and expensive. And unfortunately the nearest commercial kitchen is 35 minutes away. My partner and I are going to move to Huntsville, AL anyway in six months, so I may just forego doing business in NM.
 
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That's what I was afraid of. I understand the reasoning the State has for it's guidelines but realistically putting in a separate handwashing sink is too extravagant and expensive. And unfortunately the nearest commercial kitchen is 35 minutes away. My partner and I are going to move to Huntsville, AL anyway in six months, so I may just forego doing business in NM.

Every state has different regulations for home based food businesses. But nearly all of them regulate it. And understandable of course because of the health risk to the public. My state expanded allowable food products that can be sold from a home based business, but each county must approve those new regulations. My county has been dragging its feet because we are a major wine and food economy. So the board of supervisors is worried about the impact home-based bakery and other food businesses will have on caterers and restaurants that do events. It’s very frustrating for the cottage food industry.
 
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