How to fix a falling apart Cake

Discussion in 'Disaster Help' started by Zyni, Apr 8, 2015.

  1. Zyni

    Zyni Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2014
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    125
    Sometimes, I'm just in too much of a hurry and I don't allow the cake to cool thoroughly enough before attempting to frost it and put the layers together. Other times, the cake is simply too moist and falls apart. Yes, I said too moist. Not a common problem, right? It has happened when I used mayo in place of eggs and oil for baking cakes.

    I usually just try to patch it together as best I can, using the icing like "paste." I just wonder if there are any other ideas. I mean, the first idea would be to do it right, so it doesn't fall apart, haha, but when/if it does happen, what do you do? Any tips?
     
    Zyni, Apr 8, 2015
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Zyni

    Trellum Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2013
    Messages:
    1,772
    Likes Received:
    372
    When I just started baking I remember losing an entire cake like that :( Not cool! I never had a cake that was too moist tho, but I've had a cake falling apart for being too dry! When that happens it's so hard to put the thing together, specially if you want a layer cake. But yes, the icing has been a savior most of the time. Can't think of any other way to fix a cake that is falling apart tho... I can imagine how messy a cake that is too moist can be tho.
     
    Trellum, Apr 8, 2015
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. Zyni

    connie Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2015
    Messages:
    208
    Likes Received:
    29
    Location:
    UK
    I have had it happen as well. I just used the cake filling to paste it back together. This worked really well because I was using a semi-solid chocolate cream which when warm spread easily, when cool set solid and help the cake together, so that wasn't a problem. It cut up pretty well as well iirc.

    The only other option is to bale to something like Nutella (chocolate spread) and warm it slightly. Again it acts as a 'polyfiller' to hold the cake together, but is best with a chocolate flavoured bake - won't work with a fruit cake for which I have no ideas at all!
     
    connie, Apr 9, 2015
    #3
  4. Zyni

    tangela Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 12, 2014
    Messages:
    189
    Likes Received:
    29
    Usually when that happens, I give myself a few minutes of swearing time and be upset at myself for not being patient enough to wait or for screwing up, but then I just turn around and make them into cake balls :p I don't know if you want to do that but if not, I suppose putting a light layer of frosting on it to cover up the imperfections or to make the cake stick together should work.
     
    tangela, Apr 11, 2015
    #4
    RedShoe likes this.
  5. Zyni

    joycemcgregor Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 28, 2015
    Messages:
    65
    Likes Received:
    25
    Here in the South a popular thing is "Cake Balls." You simply crumble up a cake (perfect use for the falling apart cake) and mix it with the iceing. Then you form it into balls, put on sticks and serve. They look like lolllipops. You can dip them in melted chocolate,,, white, milk or semisweet,, and roll them in nuts, sprinkles, coconut, ect to make them more festive. Personally, I do not care for them because they are so sweet tasting but many people love them. And kids think they are the bomb!
     
    joycemcgregor, Apr 11, 2015
    #5
  6. Zyni

    Zyni Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2014
    Messages:
    542
    Likes Received:
    125
    Ah, why didn't I think of cake balls? That would work perfectly. Thanks for the tip, Tangela and Joyce. I'll have to remember that for next time. Well, hopefully I won't have too many next times, but just in case. ;)
     
    Zyni, Apr 12, 2015
    #6
  7. Zyni

    Shimus Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 4, 2015
    Messages:
    205
    Likes Received:
    21
    If a cake has been sitting out and it's falling apart, you could also freeze it and unfreeze it. This can either make it more brittle and it'll fall to pieces, or it will stick together due to the frozen nature of the cake. This works better with custard or filled cakes, and not just fluffy frosted ones ( if those fall apart, I suggest the cake balls too ). Just a Tim Hortons TimBit or a Donut Hole from anywhere else, it'll satisfy.
     
    Shimus, Apr 12, 2015
    #7
  8. Zyni

    confettine Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Dec 27, 2014
    Messages:
    142
    Likes Received:
    23
    confettine, Apr 14, 2015
    #8
    Zyni likes this.
  9. Zyni

    Winterybella Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 31, 2014
    Messages:
    1,150
    Likes Received:
    261
    Location:
    Barbados
    Now who's the comedian here?:):):) I am going with YOUR first idea:):):). On a serious note though, I would not have a problem if my cake was too moist. I'd make a ball of it and eat until I am about to burst and call it a day. I am soooo surprise that it's even the recommended thing: the "balls" that is.. well maybe I should not be surprise. Perhaps I am feeling a little sad thinking I came here with this great idea when it's already out there.:(
     
    Winterybella, Apr 14, 2015
    #9
    Zyni likes this.
  10. Zyni

    Jazzy New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2017
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    I have this problem all the time due to my very moist chocolate cake. After much trial and error i have found something that works. Once it is baked i let it cool in the freezer for about 2 hours. After it has cooled i dirty ice it with a very soft buttercream, i usually add milk to my regular buttercream to soften it to just thicker then a runny ganache. The cake being close to freezing and the buttercream being very spreadable should prevent stress on the cake. This usually stops my cakes from falling apart. Hope this helps.
     
    Jazzy, Jul 29, 2017
    #10
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.