I am searching for a "Shephards Pie" recipe

Discussion in 'Savory' started by ashley0323, Aug 16, 2016.

  1. ashley0323

    ashley0323 Well-Known Member

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    Growing up, my grandmother made shephards pie at least once a week. It was always one of my favorites. Now that I am grown and on my own, and since grandma has passed, I am without a recipe for shephards pie. I am not expecting it to be the exact recipe, cause.. lets face it.. she just threw ingredients together and it turned out perfect everytime. How do you all make your shephards pie?!
     
    ashley0323, Aug 16, 2016
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  2. ashley0323

    cafwen Member

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    I fry up mince over a fairly high temperature - best results using proper lard. When nicely browned, add chopped onions and brown as well. Then a carrot, not too thinly sliced, several tomatoes and plenty of chopped parsley. If you want a more spicy dish, add a finely minced bird's eye chili or jalapeno - I remove the seeds from the jalapeno. Finally add a beef stock block and small amount of water. Allow to simmer, but allow the liquid to cook away at the end - you want to have a fairly dry, glossy mixture at the end. Check the seasoning - you want a really savory taste.

    For the topping, mash up several boiled, peeled potatoes with butter and some milk, and be quite liberal with your pepper. Put the meat mixture into a baking dish and pile the mashed potato on top, Finish of the top by making a bit of a pattern on the mashed potato with a fork, add a few blobs of butter and a liberal sprinkling of paprika. Bake in a fairly hot oven, center shelf for about half an hour - you want the potato to be nicely browned with little crispy brown points. Note: a watery meat mixture will give you soggy mashed potato - not to be recommended!
     
    cafwen, Sep 3, 2016
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  3. ashley0323

    ScottAnder New Member

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    My mother use to make a "shepard's pie" using ground beef. I know its not a true "shepards pie". She would brown the meat then add chopped up onion and celery. When that was done she would either make a gravy from the fat or just used a can gravy. She would put the meat, onion, celery, and gravy in a deep baking dish. On top of that she would put mashed potatoes. Then bake it until top was nice and brown.
     
    ScottAnder, Nov 29, 2016
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  4. ashley0323

    Becky Administrator

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    It's called Cottage Pie when you make it with beef ;)
     
    Becky, Nov 30, 2016
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  5. ashley0323

    Candyland Member

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    When I need a recipe whether it be an old standard or something I want to try I Google the name of the food, in this case "Shepherds Pie" and then Pinterest. Check this out:

    https://www.pinterest.com/explore/best-shepherds-pie-recipe/

    Read through about six and make note of the repeating ingredients, they are the ones that will make the dish. Then give it a go. Once made you can decide what it needs or needs to lose. Pinterest is fun and on top of their food game. Food52 is also worth a look.
     
    Candyland, Dec 5, 2016
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  6. ashley0323

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    In the Southern USA, we just call that "Pot Pie".
    :p
     
    ChesterV, Dec 26, 2016
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  7. ashley0323

    Candyland Member

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    Hey Chester,

    Pot Pie and Shepherds Pie are two different things. Shepherd is usually ground beef with veggies and a potato topping, more then one serving as well. A pot pie has crust like a dessert pie usually made with chicken chunks or beef chunks, veggies and a gravy type center. Try Googling both, the name, then Pinterest and you'll see what comes up, both great but not the same thing. Hope your holiday was nice.
     
    Candyland, Dec 27, 2016
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  8. ashley0323

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    Standard pot pie is made with crust. There are many variations though. One variation is a mashed potato crust, and gravy inside instead of a thick coagulative. It is still called "pot pie" here, regardless of the variety or type it is.

    Pot pie is more of a generic term here in the Southern USA than what you would think of it.
    Anything made in a "pie" or casserole form, with any type of crust is considered "pot pie".
    The only exception to this would be a quiche, which does not have a top crust.
     
    ChesterV, Dec 27, 2016
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  9. ashley0323

    Candyland Member

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    Thanks for the heads up and I understand what you mean. Even when I Google them both with Southern USA in the search they still come up different but up here in the North East we have a similar situation. Large cold cut sandwiches go by one name in Philly, Hoagies. In New York they go by Subways, Blimpies and Grinders. All the same thing though and so it is with you guys. Any kind of thing in a vessel with a topping like a crust is a "pot pie". For us the shepherd and pot are two types of food. Even more of a discrepancy in the UK, fish pie, cottage pie, pie in the face. Thanks Chester, back soon.
     
    Candyland, Dec 28, 2016
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  10. ashley0323

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    My grandmother was a southern and she always call a pie with a crust a pot pie,
    A mashed potatoes topped pie was shepherd's pie.

    My ex's mother is Welsh. Shepherd pies or cottage pie were the terms she used.

    My ex called it a Shepard's pie.

    My son calls it the best darn pie for supper.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 23, 2017
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  11. ashley0323

    -Daniel- Well-Known Member

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    I'll make shepherd's pie or cottage pie at least 2 or 3 times a month, delicious, easy to make, and so filling.

    I never really measure my ingredients, but my method is this:
    - Brown mince (500g ish)
    - Add chopped onion (I like it chopped with fairly large pieces)
    - Add carrots & peas
    - Add some Worcestershire sauce (maybe a tablespoon)
    - Add some tomato puree (maybe a teaspoon)
    - Some beef stock (maybe 2 cups?
    - Some red wine if I've got it lying about
    - PEPPER - and lots of it. Because I love the stuff.
    - If I want a thicker sauce, I'll throw in a cornflour and water mix

    And I'll usually throw in some different herbs and spices depending on how I'm feeling. I cover it with the mash potatoes (sometimes I like to put mustard in the mash) and if I'm having guests over I'll grate some cheese on top.
     
    -Daniel-, Oct 25, 2017
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  12. ashley0323

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    This sounds like a delicious pie. I’m going to make this one up
     
    Norcalbaker59, Oct 25, 2017
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  13. ashley0323

    Apocalypso Well-Known Member

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    The mustard sounds good! I made a batch of this Sunday along with the bread dough. I used ground turkey, a ton of different vegetables, a pint of chopped button mushrooms, and about two cups of cooked cannelini beans in the base mixture, and all the potatoes I had plus one sweet potato in the mashed topping. It looked like a ton of mixture, so I put into two different pans; however I should have just layered it thickly. In the end, I par-froze one, and cut into squares and packed up double-decker. I'll take a couple servings of it and some of the frozen rolls when I pick up my sweetie tomorrow night at the airport (as he might not have food at home). I never know what to call it when it's made with turkey, or even vegetarian - but I looked it up and I saw that cottage pie was actually the original term, and shepherd's pie, made with lamb, came from that, so I guess cottage pie covers the form generally. I was thinking "gardeners pie" for the meatless one.
     
    Apocalypso, Oct 26, 2017
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  14. ashley0323

    -Daniel- Well-Known Member

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    I like the gardeners pie name idea! Have you done a veggie version before? I'm always looking for ways to turn traditional meat dishes into veggie versions
     
    -Daniel-, Oct 26, 2017
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  15. ashley0323

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Can you freeze mashed potatoes? I cook in bulk and freeze for future meals. I wouldn’t mind freezing a couple of small shepherds pies.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Oct 26, 2017
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  16. ashley0323

    Apocalypso Well-Known Member

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    Yes, a long time ago I did a vegetarian version using that crumbled vegetarian protein, but most of the time if I leave out any meat or poultry (or even want to bump the umami in the turkey version, I rely on well-sauteed chopped mushrooms for the meaty flavor and the gravy. This time I only used the white button mushrooms, but often I'll use cremini and a mix of wild mushrooms. Plus, I have a jar of pulverized dried porcini in my spice rack and add that to a lot of braises. In this version I added carrots, celery, zucchini (small cubes, they kind of got lost in there), a bag of mixed frozen vegetables (peas, green beans, corn) plus a lot of onions which I started sauteeing with the mushrooms. Lately when I cook a dish with ground turkey or ground chicken, I don't brown it in a dry pan, since it's got almost no fat and it gets rubbery if cooked too long. I try to poach it in the thickened liquid, in this case after I'd sauteed a lot of the vegetables, I put the sauteed mushrooms and onions (held separately) back in the pan with the liquid they'd released, added a few tablespoons of flour, and some chicken stock, and then gently cooked the turkey in that little bath. After it's no longer pink I add the remaining cooked vegetables back in.

    I was a little disappointed that my whipped potatoes kind of deflated while baking. I think maybe I was trying to stretch too few potatoes and made it a little insubstantial. Still tastes good, though I'd spiced it up a bit but in the end the spice didn't come through as much as I'd thought, so a dash of hot sauce helps!
     
    Apocalypso, Oct 27, 2017
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  17. ashley0323

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes! Thank you so much for all the great information. I just recently switched to ground turkey in place of ground beef in any dish that calls for ground meat. And I’ve been struggling with trying to cook it so that it has some flavor and decent texture. So I’m going to try all of the suggestions you were so kind to detail here. thank you very much.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Oct 27, 2017
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  18. ashley0323

    Apocalypso Well-Known Member

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    Just my personal preference. I made taco filling a while back and decided to cook the onions and mushrooms (I can't get enough mushrooms these days!) first, then try as I described gently poaching the turkey in the liquid with the seasonings already in there. It was much softer and I've stuck with that.

    As an America's Test Kitchen devotee, I know the things high in umami that can help turkey taste "beefier" include mushrooms, tomato paste (especially if you brown it a bit in the skillet before adding the liquids), soy sauce, worcestershire sauce and/or anchovies, and to me at least, cumin. I also really overuse paprika sometimes, having three different types on hand sometimes (sweet, hot, and smoky). And my favorite two items I keep in the freezer, from The Spice and Tea Exchange, are an alderwood smoked salt and their smoked black peppercorns. It's so humid here that a lot of spice clumps up so keeping it in the freezer helps.
     
    Apocalypso, Oct 28, 2017
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  19. ashley0323

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    This is very helpful, thank you. I’m glad to know that I am not the only o e who plows through paprika and cumin. Aside from salt, these two spices are the most frequently used in my cooking.

    Should peppercorns and salt be stored in the freezer? I keep black, white, and pink peppercorns. Plus an array of salts from kosher, French gray, Maldon, and black salt. I store in glass jars in spice drawer.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Oct 29, 2017
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  20. ashley0323

    Apocalypso Well-Known Member

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    Probably not outside the very humid climates like here in Florida. My old place had a very warm kitchen which was sort of tacked on to the cottage, so there I definitely needed to. I always keep my smoked salt and smoked peppercorns in the freezer, and the shallot salt from Penzey's, and usually the garlic powder. But I don't think it's a general recommendation. As you know, it's just a lot more naturally humid here.
     
    Apocalypso, Oct 29, 2017
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