Icing/glazing doughnuts


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Hi all,

I have question with regards to icing/glazing just the top of doughnuts. In particular icing the top without the icing trickling down the sides. After dipping my doughnut into the icing, I find the Icing doesn’t just stay on top of the doughnut but trickling down the sides.

I’ve tried a fairly runny icing which trickles down the sides.

I’ve also tried a thick icing but still some drips down the sides. Now with the thick icing it could be too thick and so there is a huge amount of icing on top of the doughnut which will inevitably cause it to run off and not be able to dry as quick as a thinner icing.

Does anyone have a foolproof method of making icing that consistently is great for icing just the top of doughnuts so that I can do a quick dunk, turn over and icing remains just on top?

is there any test that I could do, i.e. how long the icing coats the back of a spoon, or a timing method for icing for consistencythat will give the results I am after?

I hope I was clear with what I want to achieve. Any questions please let me know.

Many thanks for your help, and happy baking!

Matt
 
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What is the recipe for the icing that runs down the sides? What temperature are the doughnuts when icing is applied? What ambient temperature is the drying area after icing?
 
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So the recipe is very basic. It’s around 1 tablespoon of full fat milk per 100g of icing sugars (silver spoon brand). I’ll add a teaspoon of flavouring.

I allow the doughnuts to go to room temperature before icing.

the room temp is likely around 20-25 degrees Celsius.

many thanks for your help.
 
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Seems like the donuts are too warm, and you should use a mirror glaze based on cooked sugar, for example used with eclairs.

Here is a glaze from Bruno Albouze that can be adapted to your needs. This one is neutral flavored and yellow colored. Color can be changed, and a chocolate version is also available. Google mirror glaze.


Mirror Glaze
14 g Gelatin sheets
125 g Milk
300 g Heavy cream
100 g Corn syrup, or glucose
325 g Sugar
30 g Corn starch
5 g Liposoluble yellow food coloring (Optional)

Soak gelatin in cold water to soften and drain. Combine sugar and corn starch together and set aside. Meanwhile, heat up milk, heavy cream, glucose. Blend in food coloring and mix in the sugar-starch mixture. Cook to 218ºF/103ºC. Cool to 140ºF/60ºC and add gelatin; blend well and sieve. Refrigerate overnight prior using. To glaze eclairs or choux, rewarm glaze to 81ºF/27ºC. Glaze can be kept refrigerated for up to 2 weeks or frozen for months.

 
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Please see above.
Seems like the donuts are too warm, and you should use a mirror glaze based on cooked sugar, for example used with eclairs.

Here is a glaze from Bruno Albouze that can be adapted to your needs. This one is neutral flavored and yellow colored. Color can be changed, and a chocolate version is also available. Google mirror glaze.


Mirror Glaze
14 g Gelatin sheets
125 g Milk
300 g Heavy cream
100 g Corn syrup, or glucose
325 g Sugar
30 g Corn starch
5 g Liposoluble yellow food coloring (Optional)

Soak gelatin in cold water to soften and drain. Combine sugar and corn starch together and set aside. Meanwhile, heat up milk, heavy cream, glucose. Blend in food coloring and mix in the sugar-starch mixture. Cook to 218ºF/103ºC. Cool to 140ºF/60ºC and add gelatin; blend well and sieve. Refrigerate overnight prior using. To glaze eclairs or choux, rewarm glaze to 81ºF/27ºC. Glaze can be kept refrigerated for up to 2 weeks or frozen for months.

thank you very much for your help. I’ll give it a try. Maybe I could try and low the temperature of the room by opening up a door. It’s getting colder now it’s approaching winter. Room usually gets hot because of the frying.
 
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its a lost art today, fondant ( not the rolled crap).
sugar , water and corn syrup.
Boil to softball and knead until white as it cools, or just buy in a tub and warm in a bain..

 
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you can use powdered sugar with a bit of corn syrup to prevent it from cracking.
Attention has to be paid to temperature, it cannot go above warm.
When I was an apprentice the baker taught me the meaning of warm by making me stir it with my bare hand on the stove, if it burns your hand its burning the glaze. It should be fairly thick but soft enough to even itself out without running, watch as I glazed some donuts, you can see it barely flows off the spoon, its an acquired touch to know when its right. Do not try to thin it by adding more heat, use a sprinkle of water once its warmed up.

 
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thanks for the advice. For my glaze I mixed the powdered sugar with cold milk. The only issue with it getting warm would be the temperature of the room or the doughnut being too warm when glazing. Like you said I need to try and get the thickness right. Cheers.
 

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