Icing on an Iced Bun

Discussion in 'Decorating' started by Graham Smith, Feb 20, 2017.

  1. Graham Smith

    Graham Smith New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi there

    In the UK many bakeries sell iced buns, which are a sweet finger roll covered in icing. (quite often a Custard Slice or Bakewell Tart is also covered in the same type of icing)

    What I am trying to work out is what type of icing they use - most recipes just say mix icing sugar with water, but this does not create the same type of icing that you get on these buns from the bakery!

    The icing effect I am looking for is a soft but set white icing which is slightly gooey and almost chewy in texture.....i'm thinking it must be some sort of modified fondant icing?

    Any help as to what they actually use would be appreciated!

    Thanks

    Graham
     
    Graham Smith, Feb 20, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. Graham Smith

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,790
    Likes Received:
    771
    A produced icing has to keep in shape, not melt, not stick to the wrapper, and not break apart or get the bun wet inside the package. But the icing must hold its moisture to not do any of these things.

    True bun icing is nothing more than powdered sugar (icing sugar), vanilla, and water.

    Food production companies have to make this icing usable and pretty much non-degradable, but still edible. So, not only do they have sugar and flavoring, they have to formulate other chemicals into the icing to make it presentable and sustainable for the product it is going on.

    These kinds of icings usually end up being soft, pliable, and either slimy or rubbery. This is because of the other food additives and chemicals that it is made with in order for it to be packaged on an item and not just end up a wad of mush in a package, when the consumer receives it.

    If you want to make this kind of icing, then I would suggest writing the food company and ask them if they have a recipe for the icing they use. And if they do, it probably won't be the same thing that they use in production, as most companies don't give out their recipes to anyone.


    A couple of suggestions--

    If you want dry bun/cookie/biscuit icing, you might add some meringue powder to it.
    This makes the icing dry hard so it's crunchy and brittle.

    If you want more rubbery icing, you might put a bit of unflavored gelatin in the icing.
    Gelatin is able to hold the moisture and make it a bit rubbery.
    You will have to experiment with this one though, as you get different results with different amounts of gelatin used.

    Hope that helps.
     
    ChesterV, Feb 20, 2017
    #2
    Graham Smith likes this.
    1. Advertisements

  3. Graham Smith

    Graham Smith New Member

    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for your reply.

    I'm more referring to proper bakeries where they actually produce the goods in-house the same day and sell them over the shop counter rather than supermarkets but perhaps they all use similar methods - it won't hurt though I guess if I were to just ask next time i'm in there.

    I will experiment with gelatin perhaps, as it's certainly not crunchy or hard icing that I am after but I do find that using icing sugar (confectioner's sugar) generally produces a slightly coarser end product than what I am after.

    I'll let you know how I get on.

    Regards

    Graham
     
    Graham Smith, Feb 20, 2017
    #3
    ChesterV likes this.
  4. Graham Smith

    Becky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2,384
    Likes Received:
    951
    Location:
    UK
    Icing is an art! Specifically getting the mix right. You want it pretty thick in order to get that iced bun texture, so that it is set on the outside and soft underneath. The moisture from the bun should keep it like that, but they are best on the day you make them. If they are drying out then either the icing might be too thin or the bun is too dry and absorbing the moisture from the icing.
     
    Becky, Feb 23, 2017
    #4
  5. Graham Smith

    Becky Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2013
    Messages:
    2,384
    Likes Received:
    951
    Location:
    UK
    Now I really want an iced bun :D
     
    Becky, Feb 23, 2017
    #5
  6. Graham Smith

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,790
    Likes Received:
    771
    Oh, ok.

    If thats the case, then different additives they use in fresh bakeries also can change the outcome of icing.

    Water, sugar, and vanilla will make your basic icing, and depending on how much water you use will depend on what your icing can do.

    Adding cream cheese to the mixture can make an icing that can seem a bit plastic or rubbery.

    Adding a fat, like butter, can firm up an icing, give it a bit of gloss, and help it keep its shape while staying "wet".

    Adding cream to the mixture can make it thicker and creamier, but also thin out as it runs off the bun.

    There are different ways to get different textures, it just depends on what you want and how you want it to taste, as well as how you want it to act once it's been spread out over the buns.
     
    ChesterV, Feb 24, 2017
    #6
    1. Advertisements

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.