Looking for old fashioned Austrian butter cookie recipe


Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
My great grandmother from Austria made a vanilla butter cookie that was out of this world good. I know she placed vanilla beans in the sugar that she used to make the cookie dough. That's all I remember. The cookies were a bit dense with slightly crisp browned edges but not a crunchy cookie. Can anyone point me in the right direction to find the recipe? Thanks!
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
P.S. I don't know if this helps but her family lived in Vienna and Slovakia.
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
My great grandmother from Austria made a vanilla butter cookie that was out of this world good. I know she placed vanilla beans in the sugar that she used to make the cookie dough. That's all I remember. The cookies were a bit dense with slightly crisp browned edges but not a crunchy cookie. Can anyone point me in the right direction to find the recipe? Thanks!

Was it a crescent shaped cookie? The traditional Austria vanilla sugar cookie is a vanilla kipferl, also called a vanillekipferl. It is made with a combination of flour and fine freshly ground hazelnuts. There are no eggs in it. I’ve seen recipes online with eggs, but that is incorrect.

I have a recipe from the famous pastry chef Franz Augustin, who managed the Demel in the 1990’s. The Demel is the most famous pastry shop in Austria. They were the confectioner’s to the Royal Court. But it is in metric weight, and the instructions are very vague since the book was written for professionals. Let me know if think it is what you are looking for and I will post it for you.
 
Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
They were round drop cookies without any nuts. I'm not sure if Grandma just made them that way as a shortcut or if it was traditional shape. The cookies you mention sound delicious and I'd love to have that recipe. Thank you.
 
Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
They were round drop cookies without any nuts. I'm not sure if Grandma just made them that way as a shortcut or if it was traditional shape. The cookies you mention sound delicious and I'd love to have that recipe. Thank you.
A drop cookie is unusual for an old world cookie. Most old world cookies are pansakenly rolled, cut, shaped, layered and filled. It’s heartbreaking when we lose those family recipes. I‘d give anything to have my grandma’s recipe box.

As I mention the book is very short on instructions since it is aimed at the advanced/professional baker. So I filled in a lot of the instructions. But the method is as it would be produced in a commercial kitchen.



Vanilla Kipferl
adapted from Franz Augustin


Vanilla Sugar
2 vanilla beans
20g confectioner’s sugar
100 g hazelnuts, finely ground (NOTE: toast and skin extra hazelnut to ensure you have 100g after grinding)
200 g unsalted European style butter, 65°F
60 g baker’s (superfine or caster) sugar
180 g all purpose flour
50 ml rum
confectioner’s sugar for coating

Slit vanilla beans lengthwise; with tip of knife scape vanilla pulp out of each bean and mix into confectioner’s sugar. Set aside

Preheat oven 350°F. Place hazelnuts on baking sheet in a single layer and bake for 10 - 15 minutes or until skins begin to blister. Remove from oven and transfer hazelnuts to clean tea towel. Wrap tightly and let set 1 minute. Rub hazelnuts in towel to remove skins. Cool completely. Grind to fine flour for use. Weigh 100 g hazelnut flour

Whisk flour and finely ground hazelnut flour together, set aside

Measure out rum, set aside

Attach paddle attachment to stand mixer

Place butter, sugar, vanilla sugar in mixer bowl, beat med-high 2 minutes

Scrape sides and bottom of bowl

Beat med-high additional 2 minutes

Add flour and hazelnut mixture and rum

Mix until combined

Divide dough into three equal portions about 200 g each

Roll into logs and wrap in plastic wrap

Chill overnight in the refrigerator


TO BAKE

Preheat oven to 410°F (210°C)

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper

Cut each log into 1” (2cm) thick slices and form into a crescent

Do not make too thin as thin cookies will burn

Place on baking sheet with taking care not to crowd

Bake until the edge is just lightly golden, about 10 minutes

Cool for 1 minute on the baking tray, then transfer to a cooling rack

When completely cooled, dust with confectioner’s sugar

Photos from my pastry book
D0955670-05AA-4460-ADC8-70FA031EB25C.jpeg


roll into logs and chill overnight
D7E62A34-200A-454D-95A4-4AA864CDD7D0.jpeg


slice and shape into crescents
054350BB-C7C0-4DF3-8C28-05FD3D93CBA7.jpeg



The unique flavor of kipferl is from the vanilla bean sugar and the addition of hazelnut nut flour in the butter cookie. The crescent shape is actually a Turkish (from the Ottoman Empire) symbol; the cookies was allegedly created by an Austrian baker after the Treaty of Passarowitz (1718) that gave the House of Habsburg (aka House of Austria) control of the Banat of Temeswar, which is essentially the region southeast of Austria which today makes up the countries around Croatia, Serbia, and Bosnia. The Ottomans and Habsburgs were always battling it out for control of Southern Europe. The kipferl is loved for the vanilla bean sugar; but it’s the use of vanilla bean that also makes it so expensive that it is a special occasion cookie that is served on holidays and special occasions. Or when you go to tea. This particular style of kipferl was served at the Demel with tea.

The Austrian’s also have a crescent shaped bread roll called kipferl or kifil, which dates to the 13th century. Historian belive the kifli from the 13th century is the precursor to the croissant. But kifil dates to the 10th century where it was severed as a offering to the goddess Selene.
 

Attachments

Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
Thank you so much! The cookies sound delicious just by looking at the ingredients. I've saved the recipe and will definitely make them for the holidays. I have to check out the book now lol. Thanks again.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
2,747
Reaction score
1,366
Thank you so much! The cookies sound delicious just by looking at the ingredients. I've saved the recipe and will definitely make them for the holidays. I have to check out the book now lol. Thanks again.

The book is a European series by Konemann titled Eurodelices Dine With Europe’s Master Chefs. Each one in the series focuses on an culinary areas: Cold Appetizers; Hot Appetizers: Fish & Seafood; Meat & Poultry; Desserts; Pastries. This recipe came from the Pastries book. The book features recipes from the master pastry chefs in Europe, so it is not just a single pastry chef. Even a young Pierre Herme is featured in the book. But the entire series is geared toward the advanced to professional cook. It assumes you know all the basic cooking and basic techniques, so there are no detailed instructions. So a recipe like Brittle Sponge Ring with Vanilla Cream will list sponge cake, vanilla cream, buttercream, Charlotte cream in it’s ingredients list as it assumes the individual knows these formulas already, so not written out individually into the recipe like it would be for a home baker. But these basic recipes that every professional baker should have in their repertoire (sponges, meringues, creams, etc.) are indexed in the back of the book so they can still look them up. But again, the instructions for these even are brief as it assumes the baker knows how to execute them. Just wanted to give you a warning that the book can be complicated for the home baker. But it is an extraordinary book on fine pastry.

PS: I bought my book 20 yrs ago, so it may be out of print in the US
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Aug 23, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
1
I really appreciate all your help. Sounds like the pastry book is an excellent source but beyond my experience right now. I may still pick it up used just to "ooh and ahh" over the recipes. I'm a freak for collecting cookbooks especially older ones. Very happy to meet you on here. :)
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top