Muffin with slanted cone top?


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I read the problem is caused by oven being too hot, causing the top of the muffin to set when the middle is still trying to expand. So I lowered the oven temperature to 350 degrees for the next batch, but the problem persists. Should I lower it further? Most people seems to have no problem with 350 degree.

My receipe is

2.5 cup general purpose flour
5 table spoon sugar
0.8 teaspon salt
3.5 teaspoon baking powder

1 tablesppon vegetable oil
vanilla 1 teaspoon
2 eggs
add milk to make 1.6 cup of liquid

Then mix the solid and the liquid together.
 

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Wow, if you reduced the oven temperature to 350°F I don’t want ask what it was before you reduced it.

The oven temperature and the dark metal are both problems. Dark metal conducts heat too intensity. That’s the reason why uncoated metal baking sheets and pans are used in commercial kitchens. You have no control with the dark metal. Also coated metal like non stick, or enamel, and anodized aluminum. As a general rule. when using dark metal, coated metal, and anodized aluminum pans or baking sheets you must reduce your baking temperature by 25°F. Also check sooner for doneness. These types of pans are the bane of baking, they will go for done to over baked and ruined in seconds.

Do you have a fan on your oven or convection? If so, turn it off. That will only add to the problem. Baking in a home oven with a fan or convection mode will only ruin your baked goods.

You are also over-filling your liners. Just fill 2/3 full.

I think your recipe has a tad bit to much baking powder for a plain muffin. Operative word here is plain. Assuming each cup of flour is 120g for a total of 300 grams of flour. And each teaspoon of baking powder weighing 5 grams, for a total of 17.5 grams. The baking powder is 5.8% the weight of the flour. When you don’t have anything like blueberries, dried cranberries, or nuts weighing down the batter, the leavening would be closer to 3% the weight of the flour. Unless you plan to put fruit or nuts in the batter, I would try reducing the baking powder to around 1 3/4 - 2 teaspoons.
 
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Would silicone muffin pan be even better than aluminum pan, since they conduct heat even slower?

Haha you're right. I took the recipe from a blueberry muffin recipe and skip the blueberries. Never thought the amount of baking powder need to be adjusted.

Thanks for your help.
 
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Would silicone muffin pan be even better than aluminum pan, since they conduct heat even slower?

Haha you're right. I took the recipe from a blueberry muffin recipe and skip the blueberries. Never thought the amount of baking powder need to be adjusted.

Thanks for your help.


Actually silicone also conduct heat intensely as well. An example is the silicone baking mats. They ruin most cookies because they over heat, causing excessive spreading and overly browned browned bottoms. I use silicone very selectively.

If you are in the US, I would recommend something like the Chicago Metallic Commercial II uncoated muffin tin. It’s their retail line, but Chicago Metallic makes an actual commercial line that is used in many bakeries. I swear by there stuff. I’ve used their line for 20 yrs, and despite owning a enough bakeware to open a small kitchenware store, I reach for my Chicago Metallic more than any other brand in my kitchen.

If you don’t already have an oven thermometer, I would recommend you buy one. They are inexpensive and vital to baking and roasting. You should always check you oven temperature before you put anything in the oven. I bake most of my cakes, cupcakes, and muffins at 325°F. I find 350°F is just too hot for most batters. I can only think of two cakes that I bake at 350°F, carrot cake and an double chocolate cake.


https://www.amazon.com/stores/page/...54fe-aa73-446d-96ce-8d50e9b1682d&ref_=ast_bln
 
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When I reduced the temperature and the baking powder, it reduced the size of the top and therefore also had less noticeable slanting. But they were still slanting.

Then I remembered you mentioned the convection fan.

So the next time, I put the muffins on a higher rack so the convection fan air passes mainly below the muffin pan. Now the muffins have very little slanting.

My conclusion: The excessive baking powder and the hotter temperature merely gave the muffins a high cone top. The convection fan in the oven is what made the top slanted by making one side of the muffin hotter than another side.

The dough on the hotter side is hardened early on. When the interior of the muffins continues to rise, they push out on the cooler side and cause the top to slant towards the fan.

Unfortunately I didn't find a way to disable the convection fan in my oven. Next time I plan to put something in front of the fan to block hot air from directly blowing on the muffins.

Thank again. It was an interesting lesson.
 
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When I reduced the temperature and the baking powder, it reduced the size of the top and therefore also had less noticeable slanting. But they were still slanting.

Then I remembered you mentioned the convection fan.

So the next time, I put the muffins on a higher rack so the convection fan air passes mainly below the muffin pan. Now the muffins have very little slanting.

My conclusion: The excessive baking powder and the hotter temperature merely gave the muffins a high cone top. The convection fan in the oven is what made the top slanted by making one side of the muffin hotter than another side.

The dough on the hotter side is hardened early on. When the interior of the muffins continues to rise, they push out on the cooler side and cause the top to slant towards the fan.

Unfortunately I didn't find a way to disable the convection fan in my oven. Next time I plan to put something in front of the fan to block hot air from directly blowing on the muffins.

Thank again. It was an interesting lesson.

DO NOT COVER THE FAN OPENING. You could cause a fire if there is grease residue buildup in the fan housing or in the oven if you block the fan and let the hot air build up in the housing. If there is cooking grease in the housing, the excessive heat could cause it to vaporize. Grease residue is combustible at 700°F.

You didn’t mention you were baking in a convection oven. That’s the problem. The first pic you posted is the fan blowing the batter out of the tin as the muffins rise.

Convections ovens are no good for home use. They are a total scam. Convection was designed for commercial. It is necessary in commercial baking when a half a dozen racks or more are filled will product. The hot air is circulated to heat between all the racks. But a home baker is only baking on one rack. The fan generates way too much wind and heat for a single rack of product. People think that commercial tools and equipment are better, but a lot of equipment is not suited for home use. And the convection oven is one.

Even in a commercial baking, the time and temperature is reduced when convection ovens are used. It’s not unusual to reduce temperatures by 50°. So drop the temperature. maybe shorten the baking time, and rotate the tin midway through baking.

The next time you buy an oven, skip the convection and fan features—they are a total waste of money for the home kitchen.
 
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