My cookies are really poofy and taste different!

Discussion in 'Cookies' started by Yo Adrienne, Apr 6, 2018.

  1. Yo Adrienne

    Yo Adrienne New Member

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    Hello! I used the Nestle Toll House recipe and another one, followed them both to a T, and my cookies came out extremely poofy and had an odd taste. Hard for me to describe the taste, kinda like the cookies weren't baked enough.
     
    Yo Adrienne, Apr 6, 2018
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  2. Yo Adrienne

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum! :)

    I'm not sure what you mean by 'and another one' - you used two different recipes? Or you did two batches and they came out different?
     
    Becky, Apr 6, 2018
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  3. Yo Adrienne

    Sharzi Well-Known Member

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    Do you have a gas or electric oven?
     
    Sharzi, Apr 11, 2018
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  4. Yo Adrienne

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    If they are puffy and cakey then the first issue to consider is too much moisture . Moisture is needed to produce a thick chewy cookie, but too much will bind the ingredients. That binding inhibits evaporation of water. That in turn prevents spread. So the cookie bakes up puffy with a cakey texture.


    Eggs: eggs are a source of fat and moisture. Use 1 large egg for up to 2 cups flour. Do use extra large or jumbo size.


    Butter: butter contains fat and water. Brand matters. A generic brand will have a lower butterfat content and a higher water content. Use a brand like LandOLakes for a standard grocery store brand. Or Plugra for an even higher butterfat content.


    Flour: again brand matters as protein content and bleaching effects how the flour absorbs moisture. Gold Medal and Pillsbury are bleached and contain lower protein around 10%. They absorb less water and produce a finer crumb. These brands are more suited for cakes, cupcakes, quick breads, and some cookies like sugar cookies and shortbread.

    For substantial cookies like chocolate chip a higher protein content is needed. Try King Arthur all purpose flour; it’s unbleached with a protein content of 11.7%. So it performs much better in a chocolate chip cookie.


    Measuring: use the spoon and level method. Stir flour. Spoon into measuring cup. Level with a table knife. Most commercial recipes are developed using this method of measuring flour.


    Sugar: if you want a thicker chewy cookie, use more brown sugar than granulated sugar. Brown sugar create a thick chewy cookie, while granulated sugar create a thin crispy cookie.

    I like 75% brown sugar and 25% granulated sugar in my chocolate chip cookies.


    Creaming: bakers frequently cream incorrectly as recipes and cookbooks never explain the correct method. Recipes always state to start with room temperature butter. But in culinary school that’s not what they teach. This link will demonstrate the proper way to cream butter. When it comes to cookies the only time I use softened butter is for shortbread. I’ve used cold butter for 15 years.


    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.se.../12/cookie-science-creaming-butter-sugar.html
     
    Norcalbaker59, Apr 24, 2018
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  5. Yo Adrienne

    Becky Administrator

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    That's very interesting! Does this apply to cakes as well or just cookies?
     
    Becky, Apr 24, 2018
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  6. Yo Adrienne

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes Becky, it applies to cakes as well. In fact it’s probably more critical in chemically leavened cake than in cookies.

    When butter is too warm it will never aerate properly. Soft butter simply cannot hold the air pockets. Most bakers think of creaming butter as a method of mixing ingredients. But creaming butter enables leavening. Creaming is often referred to as mechanical leavening, but that’s not quite accurate.

    In a chemically leavened cake, a good and uniform rise depends on the CO2 expansion. The aerated butter doesn’t create the rise. Rather, aerated butter creates the air pockets to trap the CO2. The flour’s gluten network creates the framework around the air pockets, allowing for increased volume of the mass. The interplay between creamed butter, chemical leavening, and flour is the reason why it’s important to thoroughly sift the chemical leavening throughout the flour.

    My interest in baking started in 2001 when I purchased Nancy Baggett’s The All-American Cookie Book. I was so enthralled I baked nearly every cookie in her book. Almost immediately I noticed “room temperature” butter seemed problematic. I found the creamed butter was often too soft to hold aeration. While the cookies tasted great, I was convinced the distinctively amateurish look was somehow related to the creaming. So instinctively I started using cold butter. I also started converting all of the recipes from volume to metric measurement. Suddenly my cookies not only tasted great, but they looked amazing.

    Yet in the back of my mind I thought I was wrong to use cold butter. So I researched cold butter creaming. What I learned confirmed the use of cold butter is the correct method.

    A baker named Sarah Phillips has a site called Baking911.com. It’s now called Craftybaking.com. At the time, Phillips was the only source I found on cold butter creaming. That lone article reassured me that I was going about it correctly.

    As I took more baking classes in different culinary programs, I found most culinary programs also creamed with cold butter. So Phillips was not alone in advocating for the use of cold butter.

    Although I recommend using butter at 65°F (18°C), the truth is I take the butter straight from the fridge and toss it into my mixer bowl. I’m neurotic about temperature ingredients. I find straight out of the refrigerator gives me a finished dough temperature below 70°F (21°C).

    The finished dough temperature is very important to the texture of finished product. Friction creates an extraordinary amount of heat. I always say that temperature is an ingredient. Baking is chemical reaction; heat is a major factor in triggering chemical reaction. Therefore, controlling amount of heat we put in the mixing bowl is just as important to the outcome as the amounts of the other ingredients.

    When Sarah Phillips created her new site craftybaking.com, she keep most of the original content of Baking911.com. Her site is an excellent source on baking methods.


    Phillips’ original article on creaming butter.

    https://www.craftybaking.com/howto/mixing-method-creaming


    Phillips index of how to blogs.


    https://www.craftybaking.com/howto



    Phillips baking glossary


    https://www.craftybaking.com/glossary

    These photos are from a batch of chocolate chip cookies I baked.

    Temperature of the butter I used: 48.7°F (9.27°C)
    665770BA-5EF0-4D6D-A1A2-3E3362DF08D7.jpeg

    Temperature of the dough after mixing: 67.6°F (19.77°C). I also used a cold egg out of the refrigerator. Even with cold butter and eggs, friction heat increased the final dough temperature nearly 20°. If room temperature butter is alrrady too soft to properly aerate. Once the dough is finished, that butter will be on the verge of collapse before it even hits the oven heat.
    9DD58B45-95E8-495B-8CB2-8D16FCC7E94F.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, Apr 24, 2018
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  7. Yo Adrienne

    Cooking from your heart Active Member

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    Cookies came out puffy because of too much leavening in the batter, are you sure you choose the correct spoon to masseurs? I did that few times, I did not look hard enough to my measuring spoon to make sure I choose the correct one and I end up using more than I should have or less, less is easy to fix but if you use too much that's when the recipe gets a bad results.
     
    Cooking from your heart, Apr 25, 2018
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  8. Yo Adrienne

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes! This is definitely a cause of the dreaded puffy cookie!
     
    Norcalbaker59, Apr 25, 2018
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  9. Yo Adrienne

    Becky Administrator

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    That's very interesting, thanks for the added info. It makes sense that cold butter would be able to hold air better than room temperature butter... intriguing! I have struggled in the past with the sugar/butter/egg mixture going a little grainy, and I always assumed it was due to the ingredients being at different temperatures. Switching to dairy-free baking has been a whole new learning curve - when I made the chocolate cake the other day the batter went a little grainy after adding the eggs, but didn't seem to affect the end result too much. I'll try all cold ingredients next time and see how it goes :)
     
    Becky, Apr 25, 2018
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  10. Yo Adrienne

    Becky Administrator

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    Also, I chuckled at this (from the Craftsy Baking article about creaming):

    "When touched, it will have the consistency of thick, somewhat gritty (from the sugar) facial cream (sorry--couldn't think of anything else)"

    Haha!! :D
     
    Becky, Apr 25, 2018
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  11. Yo Adrienne

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    :D
     
    Norcalbaker59, Apr 26, 2018
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  12. Yo Adrienne

    Buddy Baker Active Member

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    I love the Serious Eats team! They have some much amazing content and Kenji's Cook book is a bible!
     
    Buddy Baker, Jun 1, 2018
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  13. Yo Adrienne

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    I’m a HUGE fan of Stella Parks. She’s the pastry guru at Serious Eats. While I create most of my own recipes, I have a section Stella Parks’ recipes in my baking binder. She rocks. I’m going to buy her cookbook.

    I do own Kenji’s cookbook though. I’m all about food science so I love his work.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 3, 2018
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