Not my Father's doughnuts.


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When I was an elementary and junior high school lad, my father owned a bakery/pastry shop where I worked after school. My favorite item he prepared were what he referred to as his scratch "bread" doughnuts, which by any other name would be known as raised doughnuts. Now these doughnuts were not like what you find these days at Dunkin, Krispy, Tim Hortons or any of the other chains. Those raised doughnuts have a tendency to be a bit dry and dense. On the other hand, my father's were extremely light and fluffy and almost the consistence of white bread, quite thick... and boy were they good!!! So here is the dilemma. Of course, as a kid, I never learned he recipe. I have looked up several recipies and none of them seem to match my recollection of how Father made his. For instance, most of the recipes I see call for scaled milk. Yes, I remember milk but nothing that was heated on the stove. So I'm asking for some help. Anyone out there know of a recipe that produces a very light and airy raised doughnut?????

Thanks in advance for your help!

Missing Pop's Doughnuts
 
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When I was an elementary and junior high school lad, my father owned a bakery/pastry shop where I worked after school. My favorite item he prepared were what he referred to as his scratch "bread" doughnuts, which by any other name would be known as raised doughnuts. Now these doughnuts were not like what you find these days at Dunkin, Krispy, Tim Hortons or any of the other chains. Those raised doughnuts have a tendency to be a bit dry and dense. On the other hand, my father's were extremely light and fluffy and almost the consistence of white bread, quite thick... and boy were they good!!! So here is the dilemma. Of course, as a kid, I never learned he recipe. I have looked up several recipies and none of them seem to match my recollection of how Father made his. For instance, most of the recipes I see call for scaled milk. Yes, I remember milk but nothing that was heated on the stove. So I'm asking for some help. Anyone out there know of a recipe that produces a very light and airy raised doughnut?????

Thanks in advance for your help!

Missing Pop's Doughnuts
brioche dough will work.
Maybe try milk bread or pain de mie.
 
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When I was an elementary and junior high school lad, my father owned a bakery/pastry shop where I worked after school. My favorite item he prepared were what he referred to as his scratch "bread" doughnuts, which by any other name would be known as raised doughnuts. Now these doughnuts were not like what you find these days at Dunkin, Krispy, Tim Hortons or any of the other chains. Those raised doughnuts have a tendency to be a bit dry and dense. On the other hand, my father's were extremely light and fluffy and almost the consistence of white bread, quite thick... and boy were they good!!! So here is the dilemma. Of course, as a kid, I never learned he recipe. I have looked up several recipies and none of them seem to match my recollection of how Father made his. For instance, most of the recipes I see call for scaled milk. Yes, I remember milk but nothing that was heated on the stove. So I'm asking for some help. Anyone out there know of a recipe that produces a very light and airy raised doughnut?????

Thanks in advance for your help!

Missing Pop's Doughnuts

Doesn’t sound like a raise donut, but a cake dough. Cake donut is a batter, so soft, bit more bread like with short bite. Yeast donuts is more chewy and doughy.
 

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