Oil pie crust

Discussion in 'Pastry' started by Carole, Apr 6, 2016.

  1. Carole

    Carole New Member

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    I want to try the oil crust recipe. All those I've found call for 1 1/2 cup AP flour to 1/2c oil + a tbsp or 2 of water.
    I just mixed 1 3/4 c. flour and 1/2 c oil and it is a gooey mess ( more like very thick pancake batter ????)
    All recipes seem to call for these proportions, so what might I be doing wrong? Do I just increase the flour, reduce oil?
    thank you for any help.
     
    Carole, Apr 6, 2016
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  2. Carole

    Becky Well-Known Member

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    Becky, Apr 7, 2016
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    Diane Lane likes this.
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  3. Carole

    justme4910 Well-Known Member

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    justme4910, Apr 8, 2016
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  4. Carole

    Zaxmom Member

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    I make oil pie crusts frequently. After experimenting with many recipes, I hit upon a combination of ingredients that works well for a 9 inch pyrex pie plate. I use a scale to measure flour and a pyrex liquid measuring cup. These work well for me and always yield consistent results. This recipe is for a single 9 inch pie crust.

    1 1/2 cups AP flour (6.75 ounces)
    1/2 tbsp. sugar
    1/2 tsp. salt
    1/3 cup vegetable oil (I use canola or safflower oil) plus 1 tbsp
    4-6 tbsps. ice water (maybe a little more if necessary)

    In a medium size bowl, combine flour, salt, sugar. Add oil and 4 tbsps. ice water and mix with a fork. Your dough should start to look soft and crumbly. If dough is looking dry after the addition of 4 tbsps water, then add water, a tablespoon at a time, until just about all flour is coated and holds together when pressed between your fingers. Form into a ball. You may have some stray dry bits of flour at bottom of bowl which you can either press into the dough or mix with a tad bit of water, then press into the dough. Ball of dough should not be greasy feeling nor dry and crumbly. Do not over handle. Your dough is ready for rolling. I now refer you to YouTube (how to make oil pie crusts) where you can watch many home bakers and pros roll out the dough and transfer to pie plates. I have my own method, but typing it out is a bit lengthy and this post is already long. I use a combination of methods I learned from the site. The recipe above has never failed me, so I hope it works for you.
     
    Zaxmom, May 12, 2016
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  5. Carole

    justme4910 Well-Known Member

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    thanks,I will have to give your a recipe a try ,I haven't made a pie in a long time ,hmmmm maybe one with Limes ? and a Key :)
     
    justme4910, May 14, 2016
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  6. Carole

    Diane Lane Well-Known Member

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    I've never heard of a no roll pie crust, but that sounds better for my arthritic hands. I definitely trust King Arthur's recipe. I've never gone wrong with them. All Recipes is usually good as well, but occasionally i will have to tweak the recipes, because they don't necessarily work for me. I'm saving the King Arthur one for the next time I make a pie, thanks @Becky.
     
    Diane Lane, May 16, 2016
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  7. Carole

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    I'm getting carpal tunnel in my hands, so I know how you are feeling on that!!!!

    If you happen to have a large tortilla press, you can use that to help flatten out your pie crust dough so you don't have to roll it out.

    There are also electric rolling pins, believe it or not. Do you remember the old washing machines with the squeeze rollers on them?

    This is a larger version for the home (they do make them bigger).
    This one is a hand cranked one, but they do make electric ones also.

     
    ChesterV, Jun 4, 2016
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    Diane Lane likes this.
  8. Carole

    Diane Lane Well-Known Member

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    That's definitely good to know. Would a pasta machine work the same way? I've never used one myself, but my parents had one and used it quite a bit. I wish I'd paid more attention. I have something that I call a pizza lifter that's heavyish and round, and might serve the same purpose as the tortilla press, maybe I'll try that for now.
     
    Diane Lane, Jun 6, 2016
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  9. Carole

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    You can use anything that will flatten out dough. Although the larger roller machine is fitted for pie crusts, as the pasta ones are not very wide. I would assume you would have to do two or three strips on a pasta machine and then fit them together.
     
    ChesterV, Jun 7, 2016
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    Diane Lane likes this.
  10. Carole

    Diane Lane Well-Known Member

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    That's good to know, thanks. I hadn't considered the width of the pasta machine. I don't have one, but it would probably serve multiple purposes, rather than the roller machine, and also be somewhat more compatible with the size of my kitchen. I will someday have a pasta machine. I did it kind of backwards, and have a pasta drying rack and ravioli pan, but no machine yet, since I figured I could always work up the dough by hand and stretch and cut it myself, but that was before my hand issues worsened. I think running the dough through a pasta machine and piecing two or three of them together would be an o.k. substitute for the roller machine :).
     
    Diane Lane, Jun 10, 2016
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    ChesterV likes this.
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