Puff pastry turns


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Is a single turn the same thing as a half fold?

Thanks!
A fold and a turn are two different things. Watch the video.

The butter block it prepared

The dough in wrapped in around the butter block and locked in

The dough is then
  • rolled
  • folded
  • turned 180°
  • chilled
The first time the dough is usually rolled and folded twice. Then chilled. Thereafter, the dough is rolled and folded once, then chilled. The dough is turned each time you begin to roll. The process is usually repeated three times total.


 
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90 degs ?
Is that right, It goes half around. That would be 180°. A quarter of the way around would be 90°. But you turn it halfway around or am I confused? I was trying to picture it in my head when I was writing it
 
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That does sound right to me. I think i'll have to just keep practicing to get my head around it! I think i'm just getting bogged down in the terminology. Thanks!!
 
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Is that right, It goes half around. That would be 180°. A quarter of the way around would be 90°. But you turn it halfway around or am I confused? I was trying to picture it in my head when I was writing it
A 180° turn would mean that the bottom (6 o'clock) would be the top (12 o'clock), and the top would be the bottom. So it would be a 90° turn to ensure you're not just rolling in the same directions.

@Pastrylove To summarize, the terminology is:
1) Three-fold = single fold = letter fold = tour simple in French (although that technically translates to single turn, but you get the point)
2) Four-fold = double fold = book fold = tour double

And fold/turn are used interchangeably in this context. If you want to be pedantic fold would only refer to doing the folds themselves, while turn would encompass doing the folds plus the 90° turn.

Since I've also just start practicing making puff pastry myself a couple of days ago, I figured I may as well ask another question for the experts here. Is there an optimal amount of folds/layers for classic puff pastry? I've seen anywhere from 5-6 single/letter folds, or 4 double/book folds. How do you know when you should have more layers, and when you have too many layers?
 
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It’s croissant dough but its the same method. Only difference is yeast. Their website by the way is very good. Weekend Bakery

 
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A 180° turn would mean that the bottom (6 o'clock) would be the top (12 o'clock), and the top would be the bottom. So it would be a 90° turn to ensure you're not just rolling in the same directions.

@Pastrylove To summarize, the terminology is:
1) Three-fold = single fold = letter fold = tour simple in French (although that technically translates to single turn, but you get the point)
2) Four-fold = double fold = book fold = tour double

And fold/turn are used interchangeably in this context. If you want to be pedantic fold would only refer to doing the folds themselves, while turn would encompass doing the folds plus the 90° turn.

Since I've also just start practicing making puff pastry myself a couple of days ago, I figured I may as well ask another question for the experts here. Is there an optimal amount of folds/layers for classic puff pastry? I've seen anywhere from 5-6 single/letter folds, or 4 double/book folds. How do you know when you should have more layers, and when you have too many layers?
Yes it is 90°. I am just very confused because when I fold the dough, I always lay it out sideways. Then fold inward. Then turn top to bottom. So in my brain I was thinking I was thinking I was turning 1/2 way Since I was re-orienting top to bottom. Im old. Im tired. :D
 
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Since I've also just start practicing making puff pastry myself a couple of days ago, I figured I may as well ask another question for the experts here. Is there an optimal amount of folds/layers for classic puff pastry? I've seen anywhere from 5-6 single/letter folds, or 4 double/book folds. How do you know when you should have more layers, and when you have too many layers?
In France they count the butter and dough layers, so a simple fold in of the butter = 3. Dough/butter/dough.
French flour is weaker than the typical bread flour here, all purpose is ok but a weaker blend really makes a big difference.
If you can get cake flour blend it with AP , mix 40% cake flour to 60% AP or bread.
A bit of shortening in the dough for lubrication helps,
my basic commercial formula for the dough is;
1 lb shortening or marg
13lbs flour,
2 oz salt
3 quarts ice cold water.
That takes 10lbs uns butter.
Don't mix the dough to smooth and elastic, that will be very rubbery, just bring it together and stop mixing.

Count the layers, its called thousand leaves so a thousand is a good minimum target.
Lets do the arithmatic by using 3 folds all the way for clarity.
.
1. x 3=9, but 2 layers of dough touch each other so to be exact you subtract those 2 each time, so 9-2 = 7.
2. x3 = 21 minus 2 layers that touch = 19
3. x 3 = 55
4.x 3 = 163
5. x 3 = 487
6. x 3 = 1459

I did it recently, it took 1 hr begining to end including a 30 minute rest after the 4th fold.
I did the reverse puff version with the butter on the outside, once I started I didn't put it in the cooler,
it was 4am and the kitchen was 60F. Above 68F can be a problem.

Reverse is a bit fidgity to deal with the butter being on the outside initially but after a couple of folds you don't notice any difference.
End result is far superior to regular puff dough, doesn't need any rest period after final makeup, put it on trays and throw it in the oven.

It helps to have a real rolling pin, I would not do this with a french silly stick or toy tools.
Amazon has mine for $32 free shipping, you'll never look back.

 
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