Recipe using cake tops?

Discussion in 'Cakes' started by MacShop, Jun 29, 2019.

  1. MacShop

    MacShop Member

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    Hi, we have a bakery and the delicious golden browned tops of white, yellow, and chocolate cakes are wasted, as the decorator slices them off to level the cakes. I tried making cake pops, but the flavors of everything I tried mixing with the cake tops was always overpowered by the browned cake scraps, and didn't taste appealing at all.
    Does anyone know any good recipes for these cake tops? To me they are the most delicious part of the cake. I just don't know how to use them.
     
    MacShop, Jun 29, 2019
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  2. MacShop

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Maybe lower your baking temperature and use cloth baking strips so you bake level cakes. That way you don’t create any waste. I never have to level my cakes. In fact I can’t remember the last time I leveled a cake. A domed cake is a cake that was baked too hot and too fast.


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    Norcalbaker59, Jun 30, 2019
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  3. MacShop

    MacShop Member

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    MacShop, Jul 1, 2019
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  4. MacShop

    MacShop Member

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    Thank you Norcalbaker 59. Should we lower the oven temp by, say, increments of 10 degrees per baking batch to see what happens? The cloth baking strips would not be practical bc of the large quantities, but I'm very excited about lowering the temperature.
     
    MacShop, Jul 1, 2019
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  5. MacShop

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    If you’re baking at 350°F try a test batch at 325°F. I know that may sound like a dramatic drop, but it really isn’t.


    I’m assuming your oven is convection. Convection is designed specifically for large production to circulate heat on multiple racks and between each pan. So commercial ovens are already baking much hotter than a conventional oven.


    The type of metal and any coating on your cake pans also contributes significantly to doming. Anodized aluminum, dark metal, nonstick coatings conduct heat more intensely than a natural light metal pan. So the type of metal cake pan is another consideration. Manufactures of these anodized aluminum dark metal, and nonstick types of pans actually recommend reducing baking temperature by 15°F-25°F because of the way these pans conduct heat.


    I bake my cakes at 325°F. The rare exceptions are cakes with a lot of add-ins, like carrot cake or hummingbird cake. I know several professional pastry chefs who bake at 325°F. And like me, they don’t have to level their cakes either. 350°F is just too hot for most cakes.


    Cake batter bakes from the outside toward the center. When the oven temperature is too high and/or the cake pan is conducting heat to intensely, the batter in contact with the metal heats and sets too fast. That batter actually has not has a chance to rise to its full potential. Meanwhile the batter in the center of the pan continues to rise to its full potential. But since the edges were set too soon the cake bakes low on the outside edge and high in the center, giving it a dome shape. If the heat is extreme the cake will crack in the center because the edge has set way too soon and the center ends up erupting like a volcano.

    So if you lower the heat on the outside of the pan, it keeps batter in contact with the metal cool long enough to rise and set with the batter in the center of the pan.

    The other thing you’ll find is when the cake bakes up level the cake is usually more moist and does not have a hard thick dry crust. If you notice on my orange chiffon cake there is no brown crust on the sides. Is comes out of the pan that way. That is due in part to the formula, but it’s also due in part to a lower baking temperature and a natural light metal pan. The crumb of the cake is very tender and moist. And even though the top of the cake is brown in color, that crust is very very soft. I actually just peel the crust right off; it’s so soft it comes right off. I don’t have to use simple syrups on my cakes. If I use them it’s to introduce a flavor, not to add moisture.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 1, 2019
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  6. MacShop

    DenLach Member

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    I also bake at a lower temp but also adjust the bake time accordingly. I generally add about 10 min more (give or take depending on pan size )to the baking time. I agree with Norcalbaker59, cakes just seem to come out much better, never dry or bumpy or what ever, just moist and evenly cooked throughout the entire cake with no uncooked, raw or burnt batter remaining within the cake. Only time I use 350 is when making cupcakes. 15 - 16 min at 350 is the norm for me for cupcakes. only have a few deep pan molds (like the car mold 3D cruiser pan from Wilton - use those for when making monster truck cakes) that I bake at 320 for about 70min (using a roasting pan for the water bath ) to bake it evenly and fully, but those are the few exceptions.
     
    DenLach, Jul 1, 2019
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  7. MacShop

    MacShop Member

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    I am so very grateful for your insights and suggestions. You have taken so much time to help me, and your information will change the way we do things, and make us a better bakery. Thank you soooooo much!!
     
    MacShop, Jul 3, 2019
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  8. MacShop

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    You’re welcome. Level and tossing the tops of your cakes is a real loss in both in ingredients costs as well as labor time. So the effort to get your cakes to bake level cake will definitely be worth it.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 3, 2019
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