Should I get a better mixer for donut?


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I have this KitchenAid Artisan for mixing my donut dough, but the dough gets warm because of long-dreaded mixing due to my dough isn't fully kneaded yet. Should I get a better mixer for donut? Any good recommendation?
 
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What is the problem created with warm dough? Dough needs a certain warmth to ferment. What climate/part of the world are you located?
 
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I have this KitchenAid Artisan for mixing my donut dough, but the dough gets warm because of long-dreaded mixing due to my dough isn't fully kneaded yet. Should I get a better mixer for donut? Any good recommendation?
compensate by starting with colder fluid.
Dunkin donuts uses ice water in some of their doughs.
 
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I have this KitchenAid Artisan for mixing my donut dough, but the dough gets warm because of long-dreaded mixing due to my dough isn't fully kneaded yet. Should I get a better mixer for donut? Any good recommendation?


1. a doughnut dough does not need a lot of gluten development. see recipe below.

2. the proper way to mix a dough is by controlling the temperature of the water. It’s called Desired Dough Temperature. It’s probably some thing that’s more complicated than any you want to do. But since I wrote down the steps for someone last year who I helped troubleshoot homemade doughnuts. This is from my notes.


=================


DDT = Desired dough temperature



This is the temperature that you want your dough after you finish mixing.



By adjusting the temperature of the liquid you can control the finished temperature of your mixed dough.



DDT is typically 75°F (24°C) – 82°F (28°C).



Total Temperature Factors are the things that add temperature to the dough that is NOT liquid. Remember I said you need to think of temperature as an ingredient? This is why I said that; TTF are those things that add temperature.



The water temperature is equal to (DDT x number of TTF) - (the sum of the TTF)



Total Temperature Factors (TTF)

  • Room temperature
  • Flour
  • Preferment (e.g., the poolish in the Berliner doughnuts)
  • Friction Factor (heat from mixer or hand kneading)


DDT: 75°F —this is the temperature you want your doughnut dough to be after mixing


  • Room temp 75°F
  • Preferment temp 0°F
  • Flour temp 70°F
  • Friction factor 22°F (see frictions estimates for mixing below)


Christine’s recipe does not have a preferment, so you will only use 3 factors



Required water temperature = (DDT x 3) - (room temp +

preferment temp + flour temp + friction factor)



58°F = (75°F x 3) - (75°F + 0°F + 70°F + 22°F)



There’s three steps

  • Step 1: Multiply the Desired Dough Temperature (DDT) by Total Temperature Factors (TTF) (either 3 or 4)


(75 x 3 = 225) - (75 + 0 + 70 + 22 = 167)



  • Step 2: add temperatures of all the TTF’s


(75 x 3 = 225) - (75 + 0 + 70 + 22 = 167)



  • Step 3: subtract the sum of factors from TTF
225 - 167 = 58


Temperature of the water (or liquid) is 58°F



=================================



Friction Factor Estimates


  • 22°F -24°F for mixing in home stand mixer (not a commercial mixer)

  • 6°F-8°F hand kneading gentle folds

  • 0-4°F stretch and fold



=================



 

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