Some new baking tools

Discussion in 'Equipment' started by Lee_C, Jun 20, 2019.

  1. Lee_C

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Norcalbaker, I didn't receive my Thermapen yet but I did receive these yesterday. :) I bought some mini loose base tartlet tins and tartlet rings as I want to make some fruit tarts with pastry crème/custard. And I bought some silicone baking mats which are great! Food just slides off, it reduces the need for parchment paper, and they wash clean very easily. I was going to buy a Silpat mat since they're the original and best, but these ones were highly rated plus they came as a pack of three in two sizes and have useful cake and macaroon templates and rulers. :)

    I was also going to buy a perforated tart ring from Debuyer but reconsidered because, well, the price for a single ring is quite expensive! :eek: I've also ordered a perforated silicone mat which should give a nice pattern to the underneath of pastry and bread.

    . 20190617_173713.jpg 20190617_175359.jpg 20190617_174731.jpg 20190617_184323.jpg
     
    Lee_C, Jun 20, 2019
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  2. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the world of baking tools collection!:cool: Yes baking tools are so expensiveo_O The rings you bought are stainless steel that is good. A lot of the companies use aluminum or tin. Aluminum and tin is weaker than stainless steel, so bends out of shape easily, plus tin rusts.

    Silpat was the original, and at one time the only mat available. But today there are many brands on the market that are just as good. I have a couple of different brands including Silpat.

    Yes to the perforated mat! Perforated mat is different from the silicone mat in that the mesh is not sealed in silicone. Since it’s not sealed in silicone, moisture is able to seep through the mesh and evaporate. The is ideal for baking things where you want to draw some of the moisture. Which makes it such a better mat for pate a choux, whether you’re making eclairs or puffs. The perforated mat is one of my favorite baking mats. I like it for rolls too.

    I have those same little tartlet rings! Fresh fruit tarts a family favorite.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 20, 2019
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  3. Lee_C

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    I'm glad you approve, particularly the perforated mat! :) I can't wait to make fruit tarts. I think I'm going to use kiwi, strawberry, I've already got some frozen blueberries, and maybe some peach. I want it to be colourful! I'm possibly going to follow this recipe



    He uses perforated rings. I also learned about perforated mats from that video.

    Regarding ring metals, what do you think of this cheaper copy of the debuyer perforated ring?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Qlans-Perf...&sprefix=Petforated,aps,193&sr=8-1-spons&th=1

    It says it's stainless steel but being about a quarter the price of debuyer, do you think it's more likely to be something that bends and rusts, or is it worth buying? I like the design you can get around the edges from the perforations.

    Also, do you remember when we discussed cake tins material like the Mary Berry tins and how light or dark finishes on them affect heat absorption and reflection.

    You mentioned natural aluminium are the best to get. I think you have Nordicware tins. I found a tin from Wilton, seems to be pure aluminium. I respect your opinion very highly as you're so knowledgeable on all things baking and wondered what's your opinion of this tin?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wilton-Rou...ator+cake+tin&qid=1561041100&s=gateway&sr=8-3

    Would you recommend them over the carbon steel or anodised aluminium tins we discussed? I'll still using baking belts but would these reduce the need to bake at a lower temperature? The only downside would be no loose base to lift the sponge out easily. But maybe that doesn't really matter if I'm using baker's grease? I've found the baker's grease you taught me about invaluable, it's really amazing stuff. I'm also concerned if aluminium would dent easily. But at least there's no chance of batter leakage with a fixed base.
     
    Lee_C, Jun 20, 2019
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  4. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Regarding the perforated rings: the less expensive ring will be made of a dinner stainless steel. So it may bend. But stainless steel is always better than tin or thin aluminum.

    DeBuyer is a premium brand. They use quality materials and the craftsmanship is excellent. A purchase in a DeBuyer tool is usually a one time investment. That may not be the case with another brand. BUT

    We can get carried away with our hobby. It’s always important before you purchase a tool to ask yourself how frequently you’re going to use it. Tools are very expensive. You don’t have to buy a top-of-the-line tool if they are an occasional use tool. Rings and tartlet pans can be used for different things, pies, tarts. In fact I use my tart pans more than I use pipe plates. I even use my small tartlet pans th as cutters for my hand pies. I own rings in every size. I use my rings to build cakes. I even baked cakes in large sheet and cut cake layers using rings. Are use my Tart pans and rings a lot, so for me they are a good investments.

    Regarding the cake tin: The Wilton pan is not my favorite, but Yes of the cake tins available in the UK I would definitely buy that Wilton!!!!!! DO NOT PUT IT IN THE DISHWASHER. Aluminum cake tins should be washed by hand. The dishwasher will discolor them. Use baker’s grease, parchment paper on the bottom, and the baking strips and you should a good cake with that pan. Oh and a good recipe:D
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 20, 2019
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  5. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Regarding the recipe for fruit tart: I’ll send you a recipe for pastry cream with better instructions
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 20, 2019
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  6. Lee_C

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    If we’re showing off new baking equipment purchases....I live in a small place with a galley kitchen, the counters are all tile, and narrowed down even more by canisters, microwave, mixer, etc. The usual kitchen paraphernalia. I realized after my first attempt making sourdough bread that if I wanted to be serious about this, I was going to have to get a serious wooden board on which to shape it. A big one, not just a cutting board. But also one I could move around as the only open table space for me to work on such a serious board would be the living room coffee table (we have no kitchen/dining table. Like I said, small place)...hence...see photos below.

    And yeah, this does make my venture into bread baking a tad expensive. Luckily, most of the items I needed for bread making I already had, so outside of this board, I haven’t had to buy much else. Then again, it’s not like this board is only good for bread. As you can see, it comes with measurements and a pie crust circle on the other side. I mean to make good use of them and prove to myself that this board was a worthwhile investment. :D
     

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    J13, Jun 21, 2019
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  7. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes that is a gorgeous pastry board! The brace in the edge to keep the board from moving is a must. What type of wood? It looks like maple, which I think makes for a great pastry board.

    My large pastry board was lost in my mom be from SoCal back to the Napa Valley.:( Couple weeks ago I asked my nephew’s father, who works with wood, if he would custom make a pastry board for me. So we are going to start work on the design next month. :D
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 21, 2019
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  8. Lee_C

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Those rings are super cool! Makes you wish it could be done on a larger scale, so you could make pie like that. Just punch out the bottom circle, create the sides, and bake, no docking, no nothing....
     
    J13, Jun 21, 2019
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  9. Lee_C

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    It might well be maple. The company, Catskills Craftsmen, doesn’t say exactly what they use for this particular board, but they say they use either maple or birch for all of their products. I’m pretty pleased with it... but it heavy, and, given my small place, the most difficult thing was finding a place to store it.

    And here I must give a bow of thanks to Marie Kondo and her “Tidying” show. :p If I hadn’t gone on a decluttering binge a few months ago, I don’t think there would have been anywhere to store all these flours and boards and such. :cool: “Domo Arigato, Kondo-San!”
     
    J13, Jun 21, 2019
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  10. Lee_C

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    J13, that is one very stunning pastry board! Beautiful. Looks to be about 2'x 2' ? That's nice and big. Love the wood finish and the printed templates. You're going to be making a lot of pies and bread I think! :D

    Yes the Debuyer rings look amazing, even the rectangular and square ones. Although maybe I'm old fashioned but I feel more appetised looking at traditional round tarts.
    You mentioned doing it on a larger scale. They've got large rings at 9" and 11" diameter. But the problem is they're only 3/4 inch high, so you could make a very large tart, but would that work for a pie?

    https://www.amazon.co.uk/Buyer-Stra...0RBJ9QBGKQKJ&refRID=PEHN6PY50RBJ9QBGKQKJ&th=1


    Norcalbaker, thank you so much for the information. I look forward to seeing your fruit tart recipe. Yes, you're right, it's easy to get carried away with collecting stuff for baking and no it definitely wouldn't be a frequent use thing. The perforated rings look so amazing though! I was particularly inspired by this video, the music is nice too. What a beautiful looking tart, and the shell really sets it off.


    But I'm going to bide my time and just use the rings and fluted tins I bought and maybe down the road I might consider buying a single debuyer ring as I still have some amazon gift vouchers left over.
    Yeah I kind of thought that the cheaper perforated copy might be a bit flimsy. I think it would be false economy buying that one. If I'm going to have one, it needs to be sturdy so that it will last a lifetime or certainly a few years.

    I've no idea what a pipe plate is? Sounds interesting. :) Thank you for the approval on the Wilton pans, I'll go ahead and buy a pair of them. I hope they don't dent easily. The one good thing about carbon steel pans, and anodised aluminium I think, is that they're very strong and pretty much dent proof. BUT, I'd much rather have the aluminium for better baking.

    I don't have a dishwasher, so no worries there! :D
     
    Lee_C, Jun 22, 2019
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    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    I’ll get you the recipe for that fruit tarts in couple of weeks since I’ve got a few other things on my to do lists. There’s nothing wrong with his recipe. It’s just with the pastry cream there’s a couple of things you need to know about heating the milk and cooking the custard. All about temperature. There’s a couple of things that you cannot do with pastry cream like boil it. And you must also strain it. So I am going to send you Elizabeth Pruitt‘s pastry cream recipe. I also think Pierre Herme’s pate sucree crust with some almond flour in it makes a lovely tart shell. Which by the way that lovely Korean video you attached uses a similar pate sucree.


    The Wilton aluminum cake pans should be fine in keeping its shape as they are thick enough. Wilton is a well known brand. They make a professional line that is used by bakeries. In fact my local restaurant supply store stocks their professional line. So you shouldn’t have a problem with the Wilton.

    It’s aluminum rings that you have to be concerned about getting bent out of shape. If you purchase aluminum rings they just need to be really thick.


    These are large 10” and 8” cake rings. The outside ring is stainless steel. Inside ring is aluminum. Notice how much thicker the aluminum ring is. This is actually a good quality aluminum ring. I would have to take a hammer to it to bend it.
    985F7628-E4D4-4F6D-9F5D-219CFAB15A39.jpeg


    OK here’s one of my cheap little aluminum rings that I just bought last month. This is an English muffin ring. See how bent out of shape it is. This is part of a set of six rings. Most came out of the box this way—brand new. That’s okay, English muffin doesn’t need to be perfectly round. When I purchased them, for the price I knew they were going to be cheap thin aluminum that bent easily. You get what you pay for.
    55635EF6-AF91-4398-8EBB-17EFE2B3CCB3.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 23, 2019
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  12. Lee_C

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    I suspect not as they seem meant for tarts with a ver different type of crust. More cookie-like. But I do like the idea of doing tarts this way large or small.
    That is one beautiful video. It makes baking look (and sound) so peaceful. Maybe I should do a video of my baking day...

    :eek:"AHHH! the flour fell over and it's everywhere! Four egg yolks? I only have two...gah! I only have one! The egg shattered and it's a mess in my bowl...where's my ruler, it was just here? Where's my baking tray? Oh, in the oven....Where are my oven mitts? AHHH!" :eek:

    :D I'm also amused by how small and white everything is in that video. Small pretty bowls, small spatulas...one thing that did have me wincing, however, was using a sharp knife to cut out pastry on a silpat. Or even cutting out the disks on one. They're tough, but knives can cut through them. I would have moved the dough to a cutting board.
     
    J13, Jun 23, 2019
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  13. Lee_C

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Lol J13, I like your description of your baking day. :D
    Yes you're right, I also wondered why there was cutting on the s,ilpat because it can slice through the fibreglass weave. Although I won't do that myself, it's good you pointed out they're tough in case I do accidentally cut something on it.

    Thank you, I look forward to trying the Elizabeth Pruitt recipe and maybe a pate sucree recipe.
    Regarding aluminium, I was only concerned because I read a review where someone had received a dented Wilton tin. So I thought maybe they're flimsy. But as you say they're thick enough, that's good enough for me.

    Woa yes, I can see how thick that aluminium ring is compared to the SS one. I imagine the Debuyer ones will be strong like that.

    Sorry about your muffin rings! I'm glad they're useable though.

    All my drums from my drumkit have metal hoops that go around the wooden drums on both ends of the drum, so two hoops per drum. Screws go through holes in the hoops and sandwich and tighten the drumskins down. The drum is then tuned by tightening or loosening the screws. I had dropped one of the drums, which is 15" diameter, and it put one of the hoops out of round. I spent a couple of hours pulling and bending on it to try get it back into shape. It's still not perfect but almost a true circle again.

    You might be able to manipulate your rings a little to get them a bit truer. But then again, it's probably not actually worth the hassle! :D
     
    Lee_C, Jun 23, 2019
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  14. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Lol. I think it’s very important for the drum hoop to be round, so it’s in tune. No one can enjoy an out of tune drum. But an out of tune muffin can be enjoyed by all. :D
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 24, 2019
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  15. Lee_C

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Indeed. Tap the muffin ring with a spoon, and if it sounds like E♭ or any other note, you know your muffins will still be super tasty :D
     
    Lee_C, Jun 24, 2019
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    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Lol, I will indeed do that!:cool:
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 25, 2019
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    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Yay, perforated mat arrived. Seems it came from China. :)

    20190628_125447.jpg
     
    Lee_C, Jun 28, 2019
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  18. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    That is a good mat. I think you will like how it works on things like rolls. We will have to get you to try a pate a choux
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jun 30, 2019
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    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    @NCB, yes indeed, I'm looking forward to trying it out! Ooh, a pate a choux sounds intriguing! I'm guessing it's a choux pastry? I would love to make chocolate eclairs :)

    Earlier this year I had a go at making Churros, but baked not fried. I think they're a form of choux pastry? I'd never had Churros before but I imagine fried are probably better. They came out quite nice but went really soft and kind of soggy the following day after storing them in a Tupperware type of box. But I froze a few of them straight after baking and still have them. I got the recipe from bigger bolder baking. Here's how they looked. I made up some cinnamon sugar to coat them and made a chocolate dipping sauce.

    20190305_203319.jpg 20190305_173409.jpg 20190305_162315.jpg
     
    Lee_C, Jul 2, 2019
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  20. Lee_C

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes pate a choux is choux. And your churros look great. The fried version is delicious and very popular here.

    Choux Is unfortunately one of those things that is best the day it is made.

    It is a versatile dough in that you can’t make it savory or sweet. It was one of my first great adventures in baking. I was having a dinner party and decided to make choux puffs filled with crab salad as an appetizer. So I pulled out my Julia Child‘s cookbook and went to work. They turned out splendid. But I was a nervous wreck. At some point I placed my cookbook down on the stove top without thinking...

    I’m sure Julia would understand:D
    53C11512-E59F-491B-BD22-786ED7C56718.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 2, 2019
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