Sweet Bread


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I have a sweet bread that I make and i have a question about which flour to use? Now i use General Mills Full Strength Flour 53381 Which works ok but i think it's too strong when i take a bite it has a pull like a sourdough or Artisan bread and i would like something a little more tender but still strong enough? Any ideas?
 
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I have a sweet bread that I make and i have a question about which flour to use? Now i use General Mills Full Strength Flour 53381 Which works ok but i think it's too strong when i take a bite it has a pull like a sourdough or Artisan bread and i would like something a little more tender but still strong enough? Any ideas?
Central Milling Flours. They supply the top bakeries in the country.

And unlike that General Mills flour, they don’t bromate the flour.

Understand when you change flour, you’re going to have to do some re-formulation.

Since you’re using an unbleached malted, I would suggest the Artisan Baker’s Craft Plus. 11.5% protein, 60% ash, malted.



Artisan Baker’s Craft without the “plus“ it’s not malted, has the same protein and ash content.

if you want to go even lower in protein, there is the Beehive at 10.5%.
 
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Central Milling Flours. They supply the top bakeries in the country.

And unlike that General Mills flour, they don’t bromate the flour.

Understand when you change flour, you’re going to have to do some re-formulation.

Since you’re using an unbleached malted, I would suggest the Artisan Baker’s Craft Plus. 11.5% protein, 60% ash, malted.



Artisan Baker’s Craft without the “plus“ it’s not malted, has the same protein and ash content.

if you want to go even lower in protein, there is the Beehive at 10.5%.
I am glad you responded you seam to have a lot of Baking experience and have given me great suggestions before. This is the recipie i follow and i don't think it need the Bromate or the malt but maybe you could tell?

1 cup scalded milk 227 grams
1 cup butter Crisco (bar & � butter) put into above milk to melt
1/4 Tsp salt
2 pks yeast 4.5 tsp
1 cup butter milk 1 cup milk 227 grams
8 cups flour 44 oz Flour
4 eggs beaten
1 1/4 cup sugar 9.25 oz
lemon extract 2 tbls.
1 grated lemon

Mix in stand mixer for 5 to 8 min then rise for 2 hrs remove form into braids let rise another 2 hrs and bake.
 
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I am glad you responded you seam to have a lot of Baking experience and have given me great suggestions before. This is the recipie i follow and i don't think it need the Bromate or the malt but maybe you could tell?

1 cup scalded milk 227 grams
1 cup butter Crisco (bar & � butter) put into above milk to melt
1/4 Tsp salt
2 pks yeast 4.5 tsp
1 cup butter milk 1 cup milk 227 grams
8 cups flour 44 oz Flour
4 eggs beaten
1 1/4 cup sugar 9.25 oz
lemon extract 2 tbls.
1 grated lemon

Mix in stand mixer for 5 to 8 min then rise for 2 hrs remove form into braids let rise another 2 hrs and bake.

Bromate is a bleaching agent. Not necessary in rolls.

Malt is an enzyme from barley. It’s used primarily for browning. Also aids yeast development.


You don’t need to scald milk. Milk contains enzymes times that will inhibit yeast development. So scalding the milk would destroy the enzyme. But milk is now pasteurized; so the enzyme is destroyed in pasteurization. You don’t need to scald the milk.

If you’re putting yeast in hot liquid you are killing it.


You cannot mix (knead) and proof by time. You need to understand what to look for in dough development.
 
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Bromate is a bleaching agent. Not necessary in rolls.

Malt is an enzyme from barley. It’s used primarily for browning. Also aids yeast development.


You don’t need to scald milk. Milk contains enzymes times that will inhibit yeast development. So scalding the milk would destroy the enzyme. But milk is now pasteurized; so the enzyme is destroyed in pasteurization. You don’t need to scald the milk.

If you’re putting yeast in hot liquid you are killing it.


You cannot mix (knead) and proof by time. You need to understand what to look for in dough development.
I did not know if with this sweet dough can I do the windowpane like I do with my artisan bread? If not how would I know when I have kneaded enough? I go until it Doubles. So back to the flour would AP flour work for this with less chew or strength?
 
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Bromate is a bleaching agent. Not necessary in rolls.

Malt is an enzyme from barley. It’s used primarily for browning. Also aids yeast development.


You don’t need to scald milk. Milk contains enzymes times that will inhibit yeast development. So scalding the milk would destroy the enzyme. But milk is now pasteurized; so the enzyme is destroyed in pasteurization. You don’t need to scald the milk.

If you’re putting yeast in hot liquid you are killing it.


You cannot mix (knead) and proof by time. You need to understand what to look for in dough development.
Another question in the recipe it says to scald the milk and add the Crisco into that to melt? Do i have to melt the Crisco that is the only reason I would heat the milk? Also is Crisco the fat to use? I have been reading about High Ratio Shortening would that work better ?
 
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Sweet bread is based on Portuguese massa sovada. This bread has been around a long time. It predates pasteurized milk. So people continue to scald the milk in sweet bread recipes—in a lot of recipes.

To incorporate melted butter, or in this case a solid fat, you just simply have to melt it.


Regarding the windowpane test, The test is simply to check for gluten development.

A lean dough has no fat. this is your basic bread dough, flour, yeast, salt, water. it’s a lot easier to develop gluten in a lean dough since no ingredients interfere with the gluten development.

An enriched dough contains fat, sugar, and dairy in addition to the flour, yeast, and salt. The fat, sugar, and dairy inhibit gluten development. Since these ingredients interfere with gluten development you have to knead for a longer time.

Since it takes longer to develop gluten, enriched doughs often include instructions for a windowpane test. It’s not some thing exclusive to any particular type of dough. It’s simply to avoid under kneading an enriched dough.

Most people don’t perform the window pain test correctly. They take two small a piece of dough, tear it, think they don’t have enough gluten and end up developing too much gluten in the dough.


Knowing how to test if your dough is ready to bake is also very important. You can’t just simply leave it to rise for two hours and assume it’s

Using a proper container so you can actually see window has doubled in size
EC536CBF-1230-404A-B318-96DD3EB033B5.jpeg



17151A87-549B-49C0-A976-B2B4D95CE379.jpeg


Test dough to make sure it is properly proofed
21DC0561-6660-45DA-8F14-55881E46BBDB.jpeg



Windowpane test video


 
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Thanks again as always great info. So to the last question is Crisco what I should continue to use? If so should I keep melting with the milk? And about the flour the flour I am using I think is to strong I was going to try KA unbleached all purpose what do you think?
 
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Thanks again as always great info. So to the last question is Crisco what I should continue to use? If so should I keep melting with the milk? And about the flour the flour I am using I think is to strong I was going to try KA unbleached all purpose what do you think?

Sweet bread is an enriched dough. An enriched dough contains butter, milk, and sugar. The butter adds both flavor and fat.

Crisco butter sticks do not contain any butter. They are soy bean oil, fully hydrogenated Palm oil, palm oil, mono and diglycerides, TBHQ, citric acid, natural and artificial flavor, beta carotene (as a food dye). So the Crisco adds fat, and artificial flavor. Butter naturally contains water. Crisco does not. The use of shortening is a personal choice. I can’t tell you whether or not to use it.

As to the KA all purpose flour, it’s 11.7% protein. They don’t print the ash content. It’s malted, unbleached and unbromated. It’s similar to the Central Milling protein wise, but it is a different variety of wheat. Give it a try and see how you like it.

if you have a Whole Foods or Safeway near you, the Whole Foods 365 every day organic all purpose flour and the Safeway “O” Organic (at least in California) is Central Millings Beehive flour 10% - 10.5% protein, 56% ash if you want to go even lower.
 
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Sweet bread is an enriched dough. An enriched dough contains butter, milk, and sugar. The butter adds both flavor and fat.

Crisco butter sticks do not contain any butter. They are soy bean oil, fully hydrogenated Palm oil, palm oil, mono and diglycerides, TBHQ, citric acid, natural and artificial flavor, beta carotene (as a food dye). So the Crisco adds fat, and artificial flavor. Butter naturally contains water. Crisco does not. The use of shortening is a personal choice. I can’t tell you whether or not to use it.

As to the KA all purpose flour, it’s 11.7% protein. They don’t print the ash content. It’s malted, unbleached and unbromated. It’s similar to the Central Milling protein wise, but it is a different variety of wheat. Give it a try and see how you like it.

if you have a Whole Foods or Safeway near you, the Whole Foods 365 every day organic all purpose flour and the Safeway “O” Organic (at least in California) is Central Millings Beehive flour 10% - 10.5% protein, 56% ash if you want to go even lower.
I think I will keep everything the same but I am going to try the KA. Flour. Also I think I have to knead longer based on the info you sent me. When I made my sourdough bread I took a small amount and put it in a separate small glass container so I could see when it was doubled I will do that for this proofing.
 

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