Traditional bread in your country


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Every country had their own local bread or what we called traditional bread that they had grew up with in their country and which makes them to be proud to offer to other foreign people who will visit their place. What is the name of the traditional bread in your country? What do you think that make it special as compared to the breads in other country?
 
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I am from Barbados and I guess our traditional bread is called Sweet Bread. I don't know what really makes it special. I actually think it is quite similar to bread I have had in the states. People boast of who makes the better bread and some who live abroad can't leave without their sweetbread when they return home. Here is a recipe I found online.

https://www.totallybarbados.com/bar...ation/Barbados_Food/Barbados_Recipes/3923.htm
 
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I'm sad to say, Americans don't have a traditional bread.

The closest thing we have to "traditional" bread is this....

Wonder Bread
started in 1921
view-wonder%20bread.jpg
 
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How about cornbread?

I never thought of cornbread being "bread" bread!!!! LOL

But yeah, that would have to be it. As the Europeans were introduced to cornbread by the American Indians when they came over.

Thanks Becky!

Yes, it looks like flattened, fried white bread...but its American Indian Cornbread made the original way....
ed38ae30a941cb73dc769b864d2f13f9.jpg


And thats pretty sad that I didn't realize that, since I'm half American Indian!!!!!!
:oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:
 
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I never thought of cornbread being "bread" bread!!!! LOL

But yeah, that would have to be it. As the Europeans were introduced to cornbread by the American Indians when they came over.

Thanks Becky!

Yes, it looks like flattened, fried white bread...but its American Indian Cornbread made the original way....
ed38ae30a941cb73dc769b864d2f13f9.jpg


And thats pretty sad that I didn't realize that, since I'm half American Indian!!!!!!
:oops::oops::oops::oops::oops:
Is there a recipe for these on the picture. Here in Serbia we make cornbread but not like this. This one looks like it never saw an oven. It looks like it was fried or grilled. I would try to google American cornbread but a tryed recipe would be very helpful. Anyway, in Serbia we have Serbian pogača. It si a big round bread and it has its varieties. It can even be filled with cheese and stuff like spinach.
http://www.recepti-svijeta.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/pogaca_od_spinata_i_sira.jpg
 
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Is there a recipe for these on the picture. Here in Serbia we make cornbread but not like this. This one looks like it never saw an oven. It looks like it was fried or grilled. I would try to google American cornbread but a tryed recipe would be very helpful. Anyway, in Serbia we have Serbian pogača. It si a big round bread and it has its varieties. It can even be filled with cheese and stuff like spinach.
http://www.recepti-svijeta.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/02/pogaca_od_spinata_i_sira.jpg


Hello! Yes, these cornbreads were not baked. They were cooked on a hot stone.

If you go to the history thread I created, there is a video on the history of American cornbread.
I will see if I can find a video on American Indian cornbread!!!
 
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In the Philippines, the native bread is called pandesal which was coined from the Spanish words pan, de, sal. Pan is bread, de means from or of, and sal is salt. So that means pandesal is a bread of salt because salt is mixed with the flour when it is made into dough. The pandesal is like a small bagel. For an ordinary eater, 2 pieces would be enough for breakfast but for heavy eaters, maybe 4 or 5 pieces would be the capacity.

There are stores that sell pandesal and here in this suburban village, there are small bakeshops that are open only in the morning for selling pandesal. One piece of pandesal costs 2 pesos, that's roughly 5 cents. In our house with 4 people, we usually buy 10 pieces of pandesal in the morning.
 
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Same as @Corzhens, pandesal has been a traditional part of a typical Filipino breakfast. Bakeshops would open early and some also offer early morning house-to-house deliveries to their customers. Pandesal is best served with hot coffee or chocolate. I love eating it as it is because it's very tasty even without any kind of spread.:)
 
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My family originated from Croatia and they have the most Devine breads. One that comes to mind is Peka bread. The dough is placed on a hot outdoor fireplace, then covered with a bell shape iron dome. Then hot coals are placed on top of the bell. An hour later you have the most crusty long lasting bread ever!
 
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My wife is from the Philippines and we have visited there many times over the past 15 years or so. I was also stationed there with the US Navy in the early 1980's. I am or was a baker with the Navy and also worked as such in civilian life here in the "states". I do a lot of baking from my home now. I too, also make and sell Filipino rolls called "Pandesal". The ones that I make are more like the traditional Filipino rolls. They have bread crumbs on them when they are baking and smell soooo delicious when pulled right out of the oven. I cannot compare them to bagels as was mentioned. They are more similar in taste to Hawaiian sweet rolls, but not as sweet. I bake them and package them in bags, then freeze them for future sales and personal use. True, they are much better when fresh out of the oven, but They can also be warmed up in either a toaster oven, or warming oven set around 200 F. for about 5 to 8 minutes.
pandesal.jpg
 
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In my country, all the bread we eat is different, the most common bread with pumpkins is bread, but I bake myself
 
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