Vegan Brownies!

Discussion in 'Vegan Baking' started by Evangelina, Jan 9, 2018.

  1. Evangelina

    Evangelina New Member

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    Hi Everyone,
    I've been lurking around these forums for a very long time but never joined.
    I have my own baking business and I've recently (IMO) perfected my vegan brownie recipe. My only issue is, since I sell these shrinkwrapped, sometimes after a day or two they seem to "sweat" oil.

    My ingredients include pumpkin and vegetable oil (sometimes canola, sometimes coconut), so the oil is a little orange. It's harmless, of course, but it's not very pretty. Is there some reason why? Should I reduce the amount of oil I use? Does this happen for regular brownies?

    Thanks!
     
    Evangelina, Jan 9, 2018
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  2. Evangelina

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Reducing the amount of oil will probably not stop fat separation. Fat separation and/or leaking is usually caused by inadequate emulsification. A standard brownie contains eggs to add fat and to emulsify the batter. In the absence of egg, you need an emulsifier replacement..

    Brownies are a bit difficult to stabilize in general as they contain a lot of fat and less flour than cakes and cookies.

    Adjust your emulsifier replacement. And/or consider adding other emulsifiers
    Two emulsifier replacements commonly used in vegan baking are soy lecithin and sunflower lecithin.

    I don’t bake vegan. Only gluten free and regular baking. So I cannot speak to its performance in vegan applications. But soy lecithin definitely adds stability in gluten free and wheat baked goods.

    Ive not used sunflower lecithin, so I can’t speak to its performance. From what I’ve read in trade journals, sunflower lecithin has a better nutritional profile. But sunflower lecithin performs a bit differently from soy, and can really effect texture.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jan 9, 2018
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  3. Evangelina

    Evangelina New Member

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    Fat separation! Thaaat's what it is! Thanks! I'll look into it
     
    Evangelina, Jan 9, 2018
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  4. Evangelina

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Brownies are notorious for fat separation. It either happens during baking and you end up with with a gooey fat layer, or it leaks after baking, and you have oily brownies. So it’s not just a strange quirk with you,
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jan 10, 2018
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