Want to convert family ruggelach recipe

Discussion in 'Cookies' started by Linda EH, Dec 27, 2016.

  1. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    I have a family ruggelach recipe that is made with 5 cups of flour...it is not a cream cheese pastry ruggelach..it is a cookie. It gets hand rolled and contains cinnamon sugar...chopped walnuts and raisins.
    I kept trying to convert it to a drop cookie style or even a rolled pinwheel style but am not having much luck.

    Any suggestions for converting a recipe from hand rolled to an easier process like drop cookie?
    Thanks
     
    Linda EH, Dec 27, 2016
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  2. Linda EH

    Becky Well-Known Member

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    Welcome to the forum Linda :)

    I'm not too familiar with ruggelach, isn't it a pastry? I'm not sure how you could convert that into a drop cookie. Are you looking to create a drop cookie with the same flavour?
     
    Becky, Dec 28, 2016
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  3. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    Yes..I am looking to use the same recipe but instead of rolling out the dough I want to make a drop cookie. This recipe is made with flour..it comes out like a cookie.
     
    Linda EH, Dec 28, 2016
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  4. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    If you want..I can mail you some to try. I just made 2 batches the other day.
     
    Linda EH, Dec 28, 2016
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  5. Linda EH

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

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    It's hard to convert a pastry to a cookie without changing the dough.

    I would think you need to use a cakeish style cookie dough, with the spices from the recipe.
    Possibly even use a butter sugar cookie dough. That way you can roll it up and slice it for pinwheel cookies, or use a small ice cream scoop to make "drop" style cookies.
     
    ChesterV, Dec 29, 2016
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  6. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    still looking for ideas here -- i want to make the same cookie dough and just mix in the toppings ( like you would chocolate chips but in this case it is raisins and walnuts ) vs rolling them individually and then use a cookie scoop to make them drop cookie style. the current rolled rugelach are 400 degrees for 10 minutes. This recipe is flour and Crisco -- no cream cheese….this rugelach is a cookie not a pastry.
     
    Linda EH, Aug 6, 2019
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  7. Linda EH

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    I think we need to see the recipe. As for whether they’re “pastry” or cookie...A recipe using flour, butter, eggs and sugar can, on the one hand, give you pie dough (pastry) and on the other cookies (cookie dough). And even if it’s cookie dough it may still be used as the crust of a pie (a pastry) and even if it’s a pastry dough, it might still be used for little treats called cookies.

    We need to really know what type of dough it being used here, as some rugelach dough is more pastry-like than cookie-like—or kinda in between.
     
    Last edited: Aug 8, 2019
    J13, Aug 7, 2019
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  8. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    the recipe has 1 cup sugar, 1 stick butter, 1/2 cup shortening, 5 cups flour, 3 eggs,1/3 cup orange juice, 1 tsp vanilla extract, 3 tsp baking powder - -I am doing this from memory as i don't have the recipe in front of me right now . then the filling is cinnamon sugar raisins and ground walnuts . 400 degrees 10 minutes

    the other option i have tried since my drop cookie tests are not passing muster is to roll it up log style and cut it into pinwheel circles -- ( saw a Martha recipe done that way ) that came out weird too - the fillings did not stay in and it was drier in flavor - probably too thin ..

    I saw something online recently that you don't do a straight pinwheel cut but instead do a V cut then an inverted V cut on the next cookie and i want to try that next as i think it will come out thicker and more aligned with the crescent shape i am hand rolling one by one now.

    The ultimate goal is to speed up the process -- I make 3 batches at a time of the above recipe and about 40 batches overall for the "season" -- i want to keep the flavor of the cookie but not have to hand roll each one.

    when i did drop cookies in various sizes -- the flavor gets lost -- i tried mixing in the cin sugar to the dough and then it starts to taste like oatmeal raisin. something with the rolled thin layers of the original crescent style really form the taste of the cookie.

    thanks for the suggestions. as I get older I get more and more tired when baking.
     
    Linda EH, Aug 8, 2019
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  9. Linda EH

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Let's start with texture and making them more "drop-able." There's a lot of flour in this recipe and not much liquid by compare—which is typical rugelach—the traditional cream cheese version makes for a pretty thick dough. I assume that the consistency of this dough is similar?

    If so, then to transform them to drop "cookies" they need more liquid. More orange juice would do strange things to the flavor and up the acidity; probably not a good idea...perhaps cream? Think of them less like drop "cookies" and more like English scones (i.e: a cake-like biscuit) that's "dropped" rather than shaped (note: if you enter "drop scone" into the search engine you'll get a lot of recipes for pancakes. The British refer to "pancakes" as drop scones).

    So, add in a tablespoon or two or even three of cream till your cookies look more like a wet biscuit dough that you can drop rather than shape. To assist, take a look at this recipe for English style scones "dropped" rather than shaped: https://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/butterscotch-drop-scones-230911

    The recipe above will also give you some idea of any adjustments (or not) you might need to make in regards to the amount of baking power. Also check out this video for "cake-like tenderness" to biscuits and see if it gives you ideas on other ways to modify the rugelach so you can easy drop them, but still get a good texture:



    Okay, this is the second problem that needs addressing. Even if we get them to drop, and get them to have a consistency that is acceptable to you, we also have to copy in that cinnamon-sugar-raisins-walnut flavor.

    Obviously, you can mix the raisins and walnuts into the dough. To magnify raisin flavor....chop them up and mix with orange juice (to plump them up and enhance flavor)? or try currants instead of raisins (more currants per bite as they are smaller)? As for the cinnamon sugar. you need to double up to taste it. Put it not just inside, but out. So, add a teaspoon of cake spice if you have it, or just cinnamon if you don't to the dough. Then make up the cinnamon sugar. Before baking, sprinkle cinnamon sugar liberally over tops of drop cookies.

    I suggest cake spice in the dough rather than just cinnamon because that way the cookies taste of spice, but the cinnamon sugar topping stands out as "cinnamon-y."

    Another alternative: keep teaspoon spice in the dough. but leave out the raisins walnuts from the dough. Mix them up as usual with cinnamon sugar. Either punch your thumb into each drop cookie and add a spoonful of the mix in the middle, OR, drop a little dough, add a dollop of raisin-spice-cinnamon-surgar, then top with more dough. So you end up with a kind of coffee-cake middle to the drop cookies. Either way, sprinkle the tops of these with additional cinnamon sugar.

    Last bit of advice: obviously, you're going to have to experiment. Maybe you're doing this...but in case you're not...it would be easier for you to cut this recipe into 1/3rd (meaning, one egg, one tablespoon cream, etc.), to experiment. Less to throw away. Or, better yet, keep the recipe the same, divide into thirds of equal weight, and try a different experiment on each—different amounts of cream (or milk?), raisins/walnuts mixed in or not, etc.

    IMPORTANT: you need to understand that altering this recipe so you can drop rather than roll out means an alteration to the texture/flavor...achieving the same flavor, etc. might not be possible in this shape. Focus, instead, on capturing the "spirit" of the original rugeluch. :) That, I think, is absolutely do-able.
     
    Last edited: Aug 9, 2019
    J13, Aug 9, 2019
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  10. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    Thanks for all the suggestions to try.
    As for temperature adjustments.. .?
    Instead of 400 degrees for 10 minutes in a rolled cookie.....
     
    Linda EH, Aug 10, 2019
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  11. Linda EH

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Start at the same temp and time, just check up on them and expect that they might need an extra 5 minutes. If they are wetter, they'll need more time to evaporate the wetness. Also, they might not be the same size. Just check on them and see how they're rising up and if they're browning.

    This does bring up the issue of the raisins walnuts. I assume that in the traditional rugelach they're on the "outside" of the cookie and baked along with the cookie. If that's the case, you might do better with the thumb-print (use the back of a spoon and make a small well?) drop cookies. Otherwise, the raisins/walnut mix won't bake as much as usual.

    Keep us posted on your progress.:)
     
    J13, Aug 10, 2019
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  12. Linda EH

    Linda EH Member

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    actually the raisins, chopped fine walnuts and cinnamon sugar are on the inside of the cookie before you roll it up. When I tried last time to mix it into the dough it came out tasting like an oatmeal raisin cookie ! I won't start baking til October so i will start my new experiments then.
     
    Linda EH, Aug 16, 2019
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