Why does my bread dough take longer to fully rise


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This is with any yeast dough I make,if I was to rise my dough for 2 hours 1 hour for the first rise and another hour for the second rise ,it will come out fine ,but when I eat it it's slightly doughy, slightly underproofed but if I proof my dough for 3 hours or 4 hours the taste is fine like it's fully proofed.
 
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Rise time depends on type of flour, hydration level, type of yeast, whether sugar, salt, fats, and or dairy was added, temperature of finished dough, ambient temperature of room/proof box, and humidity.

Whole wheat flour and/or doughs mixed with whole wheat flour, rye flours and other such flours will not rise much. These are the nature of the beast.

Whole wheat flour contains all the bran and germ; they are heavy so weigh down the dough. The bran is also sharp; when kneading, the bran cuts the gluten network, further inhibiting rise.

Sugar, salt, fat, and dairy all inhibit rise. This is due to yeast being a living organism. Too much sugar over feeds the yeast, they plow through their food source and die off. if there’s 10% or more sugar in the formula, whether directly or indirectly you have to use osmotolerant yeast. Salt causes the yeast to die from reverse osmosis. Fat and dairy coat the starch molecules, inhibiting rise.

I’ve discussed temperature with you on other posts about your donuts. DDT is the foundation of all baking.

I’ve written explanation on this blog somewhere on how to calculate DDT. But Google it. It’s easy to find because its baking 101. King Arthur flour has an explanation of DDT on their blog.
 
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Baking I find a little hard cause I'm not as smart and quite stupid so sorry for asking this question.
 
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Baking I find a little hard cause I'm not as smart and quite stupid so sorry for asking this question that's the reason I'm here in the first place
 
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No, You just don’t have the training. Cookbooks and online videos don’t explain/illustrate how to bake correctly.

If you go to Bake with Jack website, he’s a professional British baker, one of the few who teaches the correct way to mix and knead bread dough. He lessons are geared for the home baker, but he uses a lot of professional techniques and processes.

He also explains some of the science, not in any technical terms, but easy to understand everyday language. He also has recipes that are extremely forgiving.


Example of his videos.

 

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