Convection oven fan bypass.


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Has anyone ever bypassed the low high swith on Duke oven to turn off? I recently purchased a Duke convection oven for our new cupcake shoppe. Wish I had not because the fan on low blows the batter over the tops. Duke just says there's nothing I can do and would void warranty. The oven is brand new and useless. Thank you
Kasqe
 
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Talk to the equipment supplier where you purchased the oven about exchanging it for different oven. Make sure you do your research to find out what you need in an oven. You may not get credit for the full price, but if the oven is useless to you as is, then taking the loss on an exchange is better than where you are at now.
 
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Has anyone ever bypassed the low high swith on Duke oven to turn off? I recently purchased a Duke convection oven for our new cupcake shoppe. Wish I had not because the fan on low blows the batter over the tops. Duke just says there's nothing I can do and would void warranty. The oven is brand new and useless. Thank you
Kasqe
Its a common problem with convection, Duke is correct in that restricting air flow will overheat the element but that doesn't mean theres nothing you can do, thats silly of them.
We used to souffles in convection.
.you can place an inverted hotel pan over the cupcake mold to shield it from the blast, remove to finish once the cake starts to set, it will need to bake longer than straight convection but it works.

If you don't have hotel pans just buy a foil roasting pan and put a 1lb weight on top to keep it from floating around when the blast hits it.
You can then cut some holes in the foil pan to allow limited air flow.

If you bake on sheetpans place a second sheetpan inverted over the top, you may or may not have enough clearance if the cupcakes are tall. I have perforated trays that would be ideal for that.

If you do cupcakes exclusively then a more engineered solution would be better, something like baffles to redirect the airflow.
Air is sucked in through the center of the fan, its called a squirrel cage, and redirected out the sides across the coils, so intake air cannot be reduced without risking overheating the coil. But the output can be deflected as long as it doesn't create backpressure, just deflect it up or down. a simple deflection will slow the blast down. It would need deflecting on both sides.
A long piece of sheet metal from the bottom of the over to the top, 3 inch wide, cut slits to make baffles, alum snow and ice shield from home depot is perfect, cuts easy with tin snips or heavy kitchen shears. Be careful not to choke the air flow, just redirect it.
 
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There are literally thousands of cupcake only bakeries in this country. There are ovens that that will work. Talk to the equipment supplier about exchanging the oven. There is no reason to turn yourself into MacGyver every time you need to put a tray of cupcakes into the oven. That is not the reason you went into business.
 
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Its a common problem with convection, Duke is correct in that restricting air flow will overheat the element but that doesn't mean theres nothing you can do, thats silly of them.
We used to souffles in convection.
.you can place an inverted hotel pan over the cupcake mold to shield it from the blast, remove to finish once the cake starts to set, it will need to bake longer than straight convection but it works.

If you don't have hotel pans just buy a foil roasting pan and put a 1lb weight on top to keep it from floating around when the blast hits it.
You can then cut some holes in the foil pan to allow limited air flow.

If you bake on sheetpans place a second sheetpan inverted over the top, you may or may not have enough clearance if the cupcakes are tall. I have perforated trays that would be ideal for that.

If you do cupcakes exclusively then a more engineered solution would be better, something like baffles to redirect the airflow.
Air is sucked in through the center of the fan, its called a squirrel cage, and redirected out the sides across the coils, so intake air cannot be reduced without risking overheating the coil. But the output can be deflected as long as it doesn't create backpressure, just deflect it up or down. a simple deflection will slow the blast down. It would need deflecting on both sides.
A long piece of sheet metal from the bottom of the over to the top, 3 inch wide, cut slits to make baffles, alum snow and ice shield from home depot is perfect, cuts easy with tin snips or heavy kitchen shears. Be careful not to choke the air flow, just redirect it.
Thank you. I've been thinking of a diverter of some sort. Exchanging the oven is a big cost and undertaking so I would like to figure out a way. Do you think slowing the fans speed but not block flow would hurt the gas elements?
 
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There are literally thousands of cupcake only bakeries in this country. There are ovens that that will work. Talk to the equipment supplier about exchanging the oven. There is no reason to turn yourself into MacGyver every time you need to put a tray of cupcakes into the oven. That is not the reason you went into business.
Thanks! I appreciate your response. Due to Covid our budget was hit hard. They want 25% plus shipping and my packaging it. I think I need to figure out how to make it work. I'm an industrial designer so MacGyvering is fun for me. Just don't want to break it! Ha! Thanks again!
 
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Thanks! I appreciate your response. Due to Covid our budget was hit hard. They want 25% plus shipping and my packaging it. I think I need to figure out how to make it work. I'm an industrial designer so MacGyvering is fun for me. Just don't want to break it! Ha! Thanks again!
You might find out that you lose money in the long run. MacGyvering is added labor to the cost of your cupcakes. And that cost doesn’t go away—as your oven value depreciates that cost is still there. As your labor cost for employees increases that cost is also still there. As your ingredients cost increases that cost is still there.
 
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Thank you. I've been thinking of a diverter of some sort. Exchanging the oven is a big cost and undertaking so I would like to figure out a way. Do you think slowing the fans speed but not block flow would hurt the gas elements?
Air flow rate has to stay the same over the heat exchanger or element, gas or elec doesn't matter but you can introduce some deflection which will dissipate the energy into turbulence without affecting the heat exchanger, its a lot easier done than explained.
No you cannot modulate the rpm of a capacitor start motor.
I wouldn't mess with the electronic side.
Try one deflector on one side, thats all it might need, once turbulence is introduced it might propagate enough to do the trick.
You're a baker, make it happen.
 
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I appreciate your point of view. I prefer the convection oven for its even heating and speed and believe I only need to diffuse the air. It should be a one time fixed solution either way. Im now thinking taller pans than the cupcakes might block the direct flow. I have a little playing to do. Thanks again.
 
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I appreciate your point of view. I prefer the convection oven for its even heating and speed and believe I only need to diffuse the air. It should be a one time fixed solution either way. Im now thinking taller pans than the cupcakes might block the direct flow. I have a little playing to do. Thanks again.

All the rack ovens are convection heat - heat that is transferred by air circulation of a fan. That’s what convection is.

Deck ovens use radiant and conduction heat

Revolving tray ovens don‘t damage the goods like cakes, buns, rolls because the oven trays rotate in the oven chamber--so the air is not moving

understanding your product, and then selecting the right oven for your product is key.
 
Joined
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Messages
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Its a common problem with convection, Duke is correct in that restricting air flow will overheat the element but that doesn't mean theres nothing you can do, thats silly of them.
We used to souffles in convection.
.you can place an inverted hotel pan over the cupcake mold to shield it from the blast, remove to finish once the cake starts to set, it will need to bake longer than straight convection but it works.

If you don't have hotel pans just buy a foil roasting pan and put a 1lb weight on top to keep it from floating around when the blast hits it.
You can then cut some holes in the foil pan to allow limited air flow.

If you bake on sheetpans place a second sheetpan inverted over the top, you may or may not have enough clearance if the cupcakes are tall. I have perforated trays that would be ideal for that.

If you do cupcakes exclusively then a more engineered solution would be better, something like baffles to redirect the airflow.
Air is sucked in through the center of the fan, its called a squirrel cage, and redirected out the sides across the coils, so intake air cannot be reduced without risking overheating the coil. But the output can be deflected as long as it doesn't create backpressure, just deflect it up or down. a simple deflection will slow the blast down. It would need deflecting on both sides.
A long piece of sheet metal from the bottom of the over to the top, 3 inch wide, cut slits to make baffles, alum snow and ice shield from home depot is perfect, cuts easy with tin snips or heavy kitchen shears. Be careful not to choke the air flow, just redirect it.
Thank you for your input. Diffusion is what I was thinking. I thought of the sheet metal and that got me thinking I'll try baking pans that are taller than the cupcakes. Then I'll go from there. Thanks again I really appreciate the great input. There's a solution in there somewhere!
 
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Joined
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Messages
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All the rack ovens are convection heat - heat that is transferred by air circulation of a fan. That’s what convection is.

Deck ovens use radiant and conduction heat

Revolving tray ovens don‘t damage the goods like cakes, buns, rolls because the oven trays rotate in the oven chamber--so the air is not moving

understanding your product, and then selecting the right oven for your product is key.
Yes I agree, but those also cost a fortune and take up space for a small start up. I appreciate the input . Thanks!
 

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