Am I Checking Internal Dough Temperature Correctly ?

SHA

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So I recently made banana bread and instead of using a toothpick coming out clean to gauge doneness when baking, I measured the internal temperature of the dough. My thermometer read 200 degrees F. but the bread was very overbaked. Each time I would check the temperature, I would insert the probe in the original hole I made from the 1st test. I am wondering if I should have inserted it in another area each time - I'm wondering if I was measuring the air inside the hole instead of the dough and maybe that wasn't the correct way to measure.
 
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So I recently made banana bread and instead of using a toothpick coming out clean to gauge doneness when baking, I measured the internal temperature of the dough. My thermometer read 200 degrees F. but the bread was very overbaked. Each time I would check the temperature, I would insert the probe in the original hole I made from the 1st test. I am wondering if I should have inserted it in another area each time - I'm wondering if I was measuring the air inside the hole instead of the dough and maybe that wasn't the correct way to measure.

When checking the temperature of anything, you need to find the temperatures from bottom to top. Batter in contact with the metal pan and the batter on top in contact with the dry heat will bake faster than the center. You need to track the full range of temperatures as the heat from bottom to top will bake the center quickly once those areas reach the desired temperature.

Insert the probe all the way and note the temperature; then pull it up to the center and top and note the temperatures. You don't want the top and bottom to go over your maximum temperature. Even if the center is a degree or two below the target temperature, it will continue to bake from residual heat.

If you need to retest the temperature, stick the probe in another spot.

If your quick bread is still dry, try lining the loaf pan with parchment paper. As a matter of course I always line my loaf pan; lining ensures more even baking by providing some insulation between the hot pan and the batter.

If you bake in a dark metal tin, coated tin, or anodized aluminum tin, reduce the oven temperature as these types of tins conduct heat more intensely than a plain uncoated metal tin—which leads to dried out baked goods with an an unappetizing, dark hard crust.
 
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Yes, inserting the thermometer in the same hole multiple times might have given inaccurate readings as it could have measured the air inside the hole rather than the actual dough. For accurate temperature readings insert the thermometer in different areas each time to gauge the overall doneness of the banana bread.
 
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touch testing and looking to see if it springs back never fails.
If it passes the spring back test the internal temp is irrelevant.
If it passes the temperature test it can still fail the touch test for various reasons.
 

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