I mismeasured and ended up with lots and lots of buttery brown sugar


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Hi All! I'm new here and am in need of ideas for how to use up a tupperware full of a brown/granulated/butter mixture. It's from a previous mishap in which I accidentally added in the additional "coating sugar" into the butter I needed to use in the pastry (in my defense, the recipe didn't mention that some of the ingredients needed to be divided.) Anyways, here I am with a ton of brown sugary butter and in search of creative ways to use it where measurements don't need to be exact (no idea what the ratio of sugar:butter is) - so maybe as a filling or something. But I'd be very grateful for any suggestions anyone has! Thanks :)
 
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Hi All! I'm new here and am in need of ideas for how to use up a tupperware full of a brown/granulated/butter mixture. It's from a previous mishap in which I accidentally added in the additional "coating sugar" into the butter I needed to use in the pastry (in my defense, the recipe didn't mention that some of the ingredients needed to be divided.) Anyways, here I am with a ton of brown sugary butter and in search of creative ways to use it where measurements don't need to be exact (no idea what the ratio of sugar:butter is) - so maybe as a filling or something. But I'd be very grateful for any suggestions anyone has! Thanks :)

Since you don’t know the ratio, about the only thing you can do with it is turn it into a streusel, crumb, or crisp topping for muffins, coffee cake, and crumbs.

German streusel ratio: 2:1:1 flour:sugar:butter

Example: two parts flour would be 160g flour; 80g sugar; 80g butter. But you can use two types of flour
80g flour
80g almond flour
80g sugar
80g butter

Crumb ratio: 3:1:2 or 3:3:1 sugar:butter:flour
 
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Since you don’t know the ratio, about the only thing you can do with it is turn it into a streusel, crumb, or crisp topping for muffins, coffee cake, and crumbs.

German streusel ratio: 2:1:1 flour:sugar:butter

Example: two parts flour would be 160g flour; 80g sugar; 80g butter. But you can use two types of flour
80g flour
80g almond flour
80g sugar
80g butter

Crumb ratio: 3:1:2 or 3:3:1 sugar:butter:flour
What's the difference between streusel and crumb? I've always used streusel/crumb/crisp interchangeably but those two ratios would obviously produce very different textures.
 
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What's the difference between streusel and crumb? I've always used streusel/crumb/crisp interchangeably but those two ratios would obviously produce very different textures.
@Cahoot
the ratio of fat and sugar to flour. A streusel has more flour to fat and sugar. A crumb has less flour.

Also in a streusel it is common for it to be be a mix of flour and nut powder like ground almonds. Plain flour doesn’t add any flavor, it is very starchy. But the mix of flour and ground almonds makes a very nice nutty flavor and a far better texture.
 
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@Cahoot
the ratio of fat and sugar to flour. A streusel has more flour to fat and sugar. A crumb has less flour.

Also in a streusel it is common for it to be be a mix of flour and nut powder like ground almonds. Plain flour doesn’t add any flavor, it is very starchy. But the mix of flour and ground almonds makes a very nice nutty flavor and a far better texture.
I was curious and found this article with links to pictures of recipes with the various different ratios. Very informative, if anyone's interested! I've found that I also prefer the crunchier German streusel than the sandier "crumb" toppings.
 
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I was curious and found this article with links to pictures of recipes with the various different ratios. Very informative, if anyone's interested! I've found that I also prefer the crunchier German streusel than the sandier "crumb" toppings.

That’s interesting that they say all you need is all purpose flour for German streusel. That’s definitely American style.

The traditional European version is with flour and almond flour. The recipe in Suas’ book is made with almond meal
and pastry flour. The European cookbook I bought some 20 years ago that highlights the top pastry chefs in Europe also has a mix of almond meal and flour. Pretty much every recipe that I’ve seen from a pastry chef used a mix.

About six years ago I made a American version crumb cake for a friend. His mother used to make a version from the Betty Crocker cookbook from the 1970’s with brown sugar, butter and flour. so he asked me if I would make it for him.

When I was a kid crumb cake used to be my favorite. My grandmother used to make it. I absolutely love that cake.
 
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