I cant figure out how to bake in my gas oven


Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
We recently moved, and our new place has a gas oven. I have only baked in electric ovens, and gas is giving me headaches. I tried to bake a trusted meringue recipe for a pavlova. It is not your typical meringue recipe because it cooks hot and fast, but it burned, and when I tried again the next day, lowering temps 25 degrees from the start, the outside indicated it was baked but it was not. Had I continued baking it, it would have burned. I did love how marshmallowy it was, but it was too underbaked to serve guests. Another recipe—a blueberry tart— finished 10 minutes early, at 35 rather than 45 minutes. That’s significant. My faux Basque cheesecake needed to be tossed entirely because it browned far too much. The gluten free cakes I have made did okay, but I think that is because I find GF cake recipes always require more time in the oven.

I think part of the problem is how long it takes to adjust a temp mid-bake. That may explain some of it, but after reading how finicky gas ovens can be with bursts of heat and hot spots in different places, how is a home baker with moderate experience baking everything from bread to cheesecakes to spongecakes and butter cakes compensate? I just ordered a new oven thermometer because ours somehow did not make the move.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 23, 2017
Messages
3,873
Reaction score
1,985
I use a gas oven and found out mine runs 5°F too hot. Tested it with this method: https://www.allrecipes.com/article/how-to-test-your-oven-temperature-with-sugar/

This information on sugar melting point is incorrect.

Sugar does not melt. It decomposes.

Since it decomposes, the “melting point” temperature varies widely. These facts were published in a study by food scientist from University of Illinois College of Agricultural, Consumer and Environmental Sciences in 2011.

Additionally the type source of sugar impacts how sugar decomposes. Sugar beet sugar Decomposes differently from sugar cane sugar.

The only way to measure the temperature of your oven is with an oven thermometer.

This is the study.
Joo Won Lee, Leonard C. Thomas, Shelly J. Schmidt. Can the Thermodynamic Melting Temperature of Sucrose, Glucose, and Fructose Be Measured Using Rapid-Scanning Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC)
 
Joined
Dec 30, 2019
Messages
7
Reaction score
0
Thank you both. Turns out we have a broken something or other and have scheduled a repair—the oven is 100 degrees too hot.
 
Joined
Apr 15, 2020
Messages
27
Reaction score
7
I was going to suggest get yourself an over thermometer, but NorCal Baker already suggested that. Read your oven instructions and know how to recalibrate, because over time, the oven temperature can change and you will have to recalibrate. It's not a big deal, you certainly can do that yourself. Glad you found your problem! Happy baking
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Jun 15, 2021
Messages
14
Reaction score
1
We recently moved, and our new place has a gas oven. I have only baked in electric ovens, and gas is giving me headaches. I tried to bake a trusted meringue recipe for a pavlova. It is not your typical meringue recipe because it cooks hot and fast, but it burned, and when I tried again the next day, lowering temps 25 degrees from the start, the outside indicated it was baked but it was not. Had I continued baking it, it would have burned. I did love how marshmallowy it was, but it was too underbaked to serve guests. Another recipe—a blueberry tart— finished 10 minutes early, at 35 rather than 45 minutes. That’s significant. My faux Basque cheesecake needed to be tossed entirely because it browned far too much. The gluten free cakes I have made did okay, but I think that is because I find GF cake recipes always require more time in the oven.

I think part of the problem is how long it takes to adjust a temp mid-bake. That may explain some of it, but after reading how finicky gas ovens can be with bursts of heat and hot spots in different places, how is a home baker with moderate experience baking everything from bread to cheesecakes to spongecakes and butter cakes compensate? I just ordered a new oven thermometer because ours somehow did not make the move.
The procedure for baking in a gas oven is very simple. The reason is that you only need an infrared thermometer to measure the temperature of the gas oven's flame. First, you have to measure the gas oven's flame through the infrared thermometer and adjust the time duration for baking as well. Your experience with the electric oven temperature and time settings will help you to adjust the temperature and time settings for the gas oven's temperature and time settings accordingly. I hope that it will solve your problem as well.
 
Ad

Advertisements

Joined
Feb 10, 2018
Messages
156
Reaction score
139
We recently moved, and our new place has a gas oven. I have only baked in electric ovens, and gas is giving me headaches. I tried to bake a trusted meringue recipe for a pavlova. It is not your typical meringue recipe because it cooks hot and fast, but it burned, and when I tried again the next day, lowering temps 25 degrees from the start, the outside indicated it was baked but it was not. Had I continued baking it, it would have burned. I did love how marshmallowy it was, but it was too underbaked to serve guests. Another recipe—a blueberry tart— finished 10 minutes early, at 35 rather than 45 minutes. That’s significant. My faux Basque cheesecake needed to be tossed entirely because it browned far too much. The gluten free cakes I have made did okay, but I think that is because I find GF cake recipes always require more time in the oven.

I think part of the problem is how long it takes to adjust a temp mid-bake. That may explain some of it, but after reading how finicky gas ovens can be with bursts of heat and hot spots in different places, how is a home baker with moderate experience baking everything from bread to cheesecakes to spongecakes and butter cakes compensate? I just ordered a new oven thermometer because ours somehow did not make the move.
Gas and electric are very different. While electric traps in the moisture, gas allows it to escape. My advice would be to add a pan of water into the oven when baking. This will do a few things... it will keep your baked goods from drying out too much, or keep them from baking too quickly on the outside while the inside is nowhere near being done.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Top