Shrinking Pastry!!


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Hi there fellow bakers. This is my first post here so sorry if it's been discussed before. I'm having trouble with shrinking pastry while making meat pies. The puff pastry tops always seem to shrink in the oven and break their seal. Any ideas what might be causing this? Here is what I'm using and my ratios.

• 200g Anchor butter
• 250g French T45 flour
• Pinch salt
• 75mls cold water (approx)

I'm rolling it out and doing 2 folds, then baking in a convection oven @180*C (355 Fahrenheit)

Any tips would be greatly appreciated :)
 

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There has been some feedback on thefreshloaf for you.

Can you post a photo or a link of what you are trying to achieve? The other pies in the photo on thefreshloaf did not have the same appearance as this one.
 
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There has been some feedback on thefreshloaf for you.

Can you post a photo or a link of what you are trying to achieve? The other pies in the photo on thefreshloaf did not have the same appearance as this one.
Yes I saw that thank you. I'm really just trying to get a nice seal on the pie like these pictured here.
 

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Was egg wash used to adhere the lid (top) to the bottom crust?

Can you please post the recipe and the source (website) it came from?
 
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Was egg wash used to adhere the lid (top) to the bottom crust?

Can you please post the recipe and the source (website) it came from?
I used water to stick the lid on. I was following this recipe but they used store-bought pastry. I decided to make my own.

I followed this pastry recipe: puff pastry

and this filling recipe: filling
 
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Your dough is better than that other dough in the photo
, T45 is good, just roll the dough thinner.
Roll it out, let it relax 10 minutes and roll it again, it will roll out much easier with the relax period.
Allow 15 minutes to relax again before baking.
The idea is to get the tension out of the dough before it hits the heat.
 
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Your dough is better than that other dough in the photo
, T45 is good, just roll the dough thinner.
Roll it out, let it relax 10 minutes and roll it again, it will roll out much easier with the relax period.
Allow 15 minutes to relax again before baking.
The idea is to get the tension out of the dough before it hits the heat.
Thanks for the tips. Would you just let it relax at room temperature?
 
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Found this online. Shrinking can be due to gluten:

Let’s talk about gluten.​

The first 2 rules exist almost exclusively to control the amount of gluten formation. Huh? Okay, I’ll break it down for you.

Gluten is two proteins that are found in wheat that, when hydrated and agitated, form a felt-like network. They are responsible for the structure in your pie crust. You need a certain amount of gluten to create a flakey crust that won’t just crumble or fall apart after slicing. But gluten is also what makes your pastry shrink or become tough when it should be delicate.

There are several key steps in pastry making that are all about making sure only the appropriate amount of gluten forms. Gluten forms best in a warm environment, so back to the #1 rule of keeping it cold. Cutting in the butter coats some of those gluten strands so that they cannot form a tight, cohesive network.

This brings us to the second rule of pastry. You need to work quickly once you begin adding the water because gluten needs to be hydrated before it forms. The faster you work and the colder your water, the less gluten has a chance to form.
 
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Found this online. Shrinking can be due to gluten:

Let’s talk about gluten.​

The first 2 rules exist almost exclusively to control the amount of gluten formation. Huh? Okay, I’ll break it down for you.

Gluten is two proteins that are found in wheat that, when hydrated and agitated, form a felt-like network. They are responsible for the structure in your pie crust. You need a certain amount of gluten to create a flakey crust that won’t just crumble or fall apart after slicing. But gluten is also what makes your pastry shrink or become tough when it should be delicate.

There are several key steps in pastry making that are all about making sure only the appropriate amount of gluten forms. Gluten forms best in a warm environment, so back to the #1 rule of keeping it cold. Cutting in the butter coats some of those gluten strands so that they cannot form a tight, cohesive network.

This brings us to the second rule of pastry. You need to work quickly once you begin adding the water because gluten needs to be hydrated before it forms. The faster you work and the colder your water, the less gluten has a chance to form.
Thats only part of the information.
And it doesn't apply to T45.
It would be like trying to develop gluten in cake flour, its just not there to develop.
If there is a danger of gluten development you've got an unsuitable flour, it can be done but why fight something you can leave out to begin with.
 
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Thanks for the tips. Would you just let it relax at room temperature?
That depends on the temperature of your room.
If its above the melt point of butter its a problem, if its cooler its safe.
I like to work at 60 to 70F. Feel the dough with the back of your hand, it should feel quite cool or cold.

But it needs chilling to firm up before you can proceed, you can't make the dough and immediately make pies.
I would give it at least a couple of hours if not overnight.
 

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