BAKING CAKE HELP !!

Discussion in 'Cakes' started by Pembo2, Dec 5, 2018 at 2:35 PM.

  1. Pembo2

    Pembo2 New Member

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    Hi I have baked coffee and walnut cakes in my old oven which worked great, the oven broke got a new one(Bush bif22300w) and my cake rise around the edge and not the middle. I’ll try post a picture. I’ve tried 180 degrees 160 200 240, and all cakes rising the same. Any help greatly appreciated thanks.
     

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    Pembo2, Dec 5, 2018 at 2:35 PM
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  2. Pembo2

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Hello and welcome to the forum.

    All cake bakes from the outside edge inward toward the center. Your cake is baking add an inconsistent rate. The edge is baking and setting long before the center is done.

    There are several factors that contribute to a consistent rate of baking from the edge to the center,

    Mixing: If you are using the creaming method, you must ensure the butter and sugar is properly creamed and the eggs are fully emulsify into the butter and sugar. Emulsification is key to an even rise. If the fat and liquid separate it weaken the gluten structure.

    It begins with properly creamed butter. Most recipes provide the wrong instructions for creaming butter and sugar. Below is a link that will explain how to properly cream butter and sugar. It is going to go against everything you have ever read in a recipe on creamy butter and sugar. But believe me it is the correct way to do it. It is the way they teach you in culinary school, and it is the way almost every professional baker creams butter and sugar.

    Once the butter is properly creamed, add the eggs one at a time making sure it is fully incorporated before adding the next egg. Scrape down the sides and bottom of the bowl before adding the next egg.

    https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/12/cookie-science-creaming-butter-sugar.html


    Pan: I noticed your pan is dark metal. Dark metal and treated metal pans conduct heat much more intensely than a light natural metal pan. The batter in direct contact with the pan is going to heat and bake far faster than the batter in the center. Dark metal pans and treated metal pans are the worst pans to use because they bake at a inconsistent rate. The edge and bottom of the cake bakes way to quickly, so you get a dry. nasty thick brown crust. The center does not rise properly because the outer edge set to fast, restricting the rise of the batter.

    When using dark metal or treated metal pans you must reduce the baking temperature by 25°F. But since you already tried lowering the oven temperature, and the results have been the same, I would recommend you purchase light colored metal cake pans


    Cloth baking strips: another way to control the rate of baking is the use of cloth baking strips. The strips are soaked in water squeezed out then wrapped around the edge of the cake pan.
    The water keeps the outer edge of the cake pan cooler; the lowers temperature of the metal, slows the rate of baking. This not only allows a more consistent rate of baking, but produces a cake that is beautifully level.

    Oven temperature: be sure that your oven temperature is correct. If you do not have an oven thermometer I would recommend you purchase one. The difference in the actual temperature and the temperature indicated on the dial can be significant.


    A light color untreated metal cake pan like the one below is best for baking.

    2367F6A1-9199-4D0C-B2B0-0E9C6D335A83.jpeg


    Wilton makes good cloth baking strips. In the US they cost about $10 for two. The strip in the front is relatively new. This trip in the back has been through about 50 bakes. The strips are soaked while the batter is mixing. Simply squeeze out the excess water and wrap the strip around the edge of the pan

    You can also make strips using cotton fabric.
    7BA29A48-68C5-47A0-A764-B633DB15088E.jpeg

    This cake is baked using the light colored metal pan and cloth baking strips pictured above. The cake is level, and no dry crust.
    049E8EBA-205F-4F1F-B114-15B389701C44.jpeg

    I baked these to KC to demonstrate how the type of metal affects the cake. The cakes were baked from the same batch of batter, same oven temperature, at the same time. The only difference was the type of metal. The cake on top was baked in an anodized aluminum (treated metal) pan. Cake on the bottom was baked in the cake pan pictured above. Are used cloth baking strips on both pans. You can see how much more intensely the heat is conducted through the treated metal pan. It produces that disgusting tough dry brown crust but nobody wants to eat. The inside is moist, but the outer edge is inedible.
    E74F2C2E-4FA0-4DAA-B187-C41203420EF1.jpeg
     
    Norcalbaker59, Dec 5, 2018 at 8:04 PM
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  3. Pembo2

    Pembo2 New Member

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    Thank you for the reply much appreciated.
    I was using the same mixture same process as my last oven which rising great, was using 175g butter sugar flour 3 eggs tsp baking powder coffee flavouring, first time I used this new oven I used that mixture in the same cake tins and it risen that much it spilt over the cake tin into the oven. I’m thinking I may need deeper cake tins, so I’ll try find some deep lighter coloured tins, i have a oven temp gauge on the way. If that fails god knows what I’ll do haha thanks.
     
    Pembo2, Dec 6, 2018 at 6:42 AM
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