Baking conditions for souffle cheesecake

Discussion in 'Disaster Help' started by KA997, Nov 13, 2017.

  1. KA997

    KA997 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Hi,

    I want to bake one of those Japanese cotton/souffle cheesecakes in a convection microwave. I'm aware that a microwave isn't as good as a proper oven but I still wish to try.

    My concern is the baking conditions on the recipe, 150 degrees Celsius for 70 mins would probably not be the same for my 25 liter convection microwave, which I assume has no fan.

    Keeping in mind that there's also the water bath in this recipe which could alter the oven temperatures, what temperature should I use for how long ? My cake pan is around 8 inches at the base but around 10 inches on top.

    Do i follow these temperatures or try something like 110, 120 for a longer duration?

    Thanks
     
    KA997, Nov 13, 2017
    #1
    1. Advertisements

  2. KA997

    Apocalypso Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 7, 2017
    Messages:
    186
    Likes Received:
    66
    I'm afraid I don't know anything about a convection microwave oven. I'm assuming you mean it has settings to use either the microwave cooking or a convection setting, not both at once? A convection oven should, by definition, have a fan to circulate the hot air, unless there's something unique about a convection microwave I'm not getting.

    Generally if you're using a convection oven, you use a lower temperature setting. Mary Berry says generally 20 degrees Celsius lower than the temp called for without a fan. I don't think you necessarily plan for a longer duration, the temp adjustment should be compensating for the fact that the convection fan makes it bake faster. But check it for doneness. Usually with the Japanese cotton cheesecake, you'll want to bake it until the top is golden brown and the custard is just set. But you might also want to check it and just before it seems completely set, turn the oven off, and leave the cake in the hot oven with the door partly open, then fully open after a few minutes, allowing the temperature to come down gradually and prevent cracking or shrinking.

    I hope it comes out well! Show us a photo when you've done if you can. :)
     
    Apocalypso, Nov 14, 2017
    #2
    1. Advertisements

  3. KA997

    KA997 New Member

    Joined:
    Nov 13, 2017
    Messages:
    2
    Likes Received:
    1
    Thanks for the reply. Yes the microwave can cook with or without convection settings. I was unsure whether a fan is present or not which is why I asked that.

    Thanks for the tips, I shall try it out and hopefully it cooks right. :)
     
    KA997, Nov 14, 2017
    #3
    Apocalypso likes this.
  4. KA997

    ChesterV Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 7, 2015
    Messages:
    1,717
    Likes Received:
    715
    Location:
    DFW, Texas
    In a microwave convection oven, it's the same effect, the only difference is that the heat comes from the food product being bombarded by the microwaves instead of from a heating element. And anything labeled "convection" is supposed to have a fan in it to circulate the heated air, as that is what a convection oven does.......evenly distribute heat by circulating the air inside the oven.

    A convection microwave shouldn't need any temperature variances, as the heat comes from the item being heated by the microwaves, so the heat slowly builds up, the convection fan just keeps the air flowing.

    In an oven with a heating element or gas, the fan is actually keeping the heat from the element or flames from "sitting" in one spot or heating in one area too long that it would bake faster or burn. In a microwave, convection really isn't something to worry about, as there is no other heat source that will burn or overbake the food. In a microwave, the whole thing is baked from inside out, not outside inward as in a regular oven. So, actually convection in a microwave is pretty much useless, or a "gimmick" to sell a microwave.

    Now some microwaves DO have browning elements or broiling elements in them......if this is the case, then yes, a convection fan would be helpful.
     
    ChesterV, Nov 19, 2017 at 4:22 PM
    #4
    1. Advertisements

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments (here). After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.
Similar Threads
  1. justusforus

    I must find the recipe for "Ole Souffle"

    justusforus, Oct 20, 2013, in forum: Baker Banter
    Replies:
    0
    Views:
    306
    justusforus
    Oct 20, 2013
  2. Chris Gamack

    The Perfect Vanilla Souffle

    Chris Gamack, Jan 19, 2014, in forum: Baker Banter
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    502
    Vivianna
    Jun 11, 2014
  3. Shortbread92

    National Cheese Souffle Day - May 18

    Shortbread92, May 18, 2014, in forum: Baker Banter
    Replies:
    6
    Views:
    345
    Shortbread92
    May 21, 2014
  4. Tina Nord

    Chocolate Soufflé

    Tina Nord, Sep 29, 2015, in forum: Desserts
    Replies:
    5
    Views:
    310
    cookiesfromhome
    Oct 14, 2015
  5. writersblock15
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    228
    Trellum
    Apr 3, 2016
  6. Faye
    Replies:
    2
    Views:
    487
  7. Silvercupcakes

    Where do you all go for baking equipment?

    Silvercupcakes, Jul 9, 2017, in forum: Equipment
    Replies:
    3
    Views:
    152
  8. Norcalbaker59

    Selecting the right molasses for baking

    Norcalbaker59, Jul 25, 2017, in forum: Baker Banter
    Replies:
    7
    Views:
    111
    Margot
    Aug 7, 2017
Loading...