Baking time/temperature for soft rolled cookies


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I have settled on a recipe that I like for the cookie part. I have been rolling the dough 1/4" thick. I'd like to try the cookies rolled 1/8" thick. I baked the 1/4" cookies cut into 3" squares at 325° with convectionfor 17 minutes. Before I go crazy testing different baking temperatures foro the 1/8" thick cookies, 3" squares, could someone please tell me at what temperature I should bake them to keep them soft, not crispy? Thank you!
 
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The only way for you to know how the cookie will bake in your oven is to test it.

Convection is extremely high dry heat because it concentrate all the heat around a single rack. It really is not suited for home baking. Convection was designed for commercial baking in which multiple racks are filled with multiple pans or full sheets of product.

The type of bakeware will also effect your final product. anodized aluminum, coated bakeware, and dark metal will conduct heat more intensely. So product bakes drier, browns faster, forms a hard dry crust.

Example of how bakeware effects product. Same batter, same oven, baked at same time. Only difference is the cake pan. The cake with that hard dry crust is baked in a Fat Daddio anodized aluminum pan. The loveky soft white cake was baked in a uncoated plain metal pan. Choose the right pan as well as the right temperature.

6D387890-B964-401B-86BB-4FFA0F805298.jpeg
 
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The only way for you to know how the cookie will bake in your oven is to test it.

Convection is extremely high dry heat because it concentrate all the heat around a single rack. It really is not suited for home baking. Convection was designed for commercial baking in which multiple racks are filled with multiple pans or full sheets of product.

The type of bakeware will also effect your final product. anodized aluminum, coated bakeware, and dark metal will conduct heat more intensely. So product bakes drier, browns faster, forms a hard dry crust.

Example of how bakeware effects product. Same batter, same oven, baked at same time. Only difference is the cake pan. The cake with that hard dry crust is baked in a Fat Daddio anodized aluminum pan. The loveky soft white cake was baked in a uncoated plain metal pan. Choose the right pan as well as the right temperature.

View attachment 4600
The only way for you to know how the cookie will bake in your oven is to test it.

Convection is extremely high dry heat because it concentrate all the heat around a single rack. It really is not suited for home baking. Convection was designed for commercial baking in which multiple racks are filled with multiple pans or full sheets of product.

The type of bakeware will also effect your final product. anodized aluminum, coated bakeware, and dark metal will conduct heat more intensely. So product bakes drier, browns faster, forms a hard dry crust.

Example of how bakeware effects product. Same batter, same oven, baked at same time. Only difference is the cake pan. The cake with that hard dry crust is baked in a Fat Daddio anodized aluminum pan. The loveky soft white cake was baked in a uncoated plain metal pan. Choose the right pan as well as the right temperature.

View attachment 4600
Thank you, NorCal Baker. I am so glad you posted about the pan differences. I knew that darker pans cause more browning, I didn't know about the anodized aluminum. All of my cake pans are Magic Line, either solid or removable bottom, I LOVE those bottoms! I bought a Fat Daddio pan once, and I hated it because it had rounded corners. I love the square Magic Line. My cookie sheets are also uncoated aluminum, no sides.Volrath, with no sides. I love those as well. I baked my cookies at 375 for 7.5 minutes, they were perfect for ice cream sandwiches. I found yet another recipe to try, from Cooks Illustrated, and THAT recipe is even better than the rolled sugar cookies, so I am going to test that one in different size pans. Funny, but my 11x17 pan, which is suggested in that recipe, is the anodized aluminum. I think I will re-think using THAT pan, as I don't want browning on my ice cream sandwiches. May not see it on the chocolate cookie, but certainly the texture would be crusty and perhaps a little burnt tasting. I think I would rather bake 2-3 scaled batches rather than one huge pan of cookie that has to be cut up, as I might have difficulty getting such a large thin sheet of cookie out of a such a large pan. Thank you again for your help!
 
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i’m glad the cookies turned out. 375°F for 7 1/2 minutes I actually longer than I would have thought for a 1/8” sliced cookie. But that shows you the importance of needing to work out the temperature and time specific to your oven.

Parrish Magic Line and Volrath are both excellent pans. When it comes to cake, there is a reason Parrish has a cult following among cake bakers. That uncoated metal gives better control; their square pan produces sharp edges; uncoated metal produces a white cake without that dreaded dried out brown crust. And their removable bottom pans are genius.


They don't advertise--they don’t even have a website. Yet, every cake baker knows and uses Parrish.

I’m with you on Fat Daddio--I just hate that brand. That bakeware roasts everything. Cakes set too quickly on the edges, then dome and frequently crack in the center. What baffles me is bakers think its perfectly normal for a cake to volcano in the center. Instead of manufacturing a proper baking pan, Wilton, who also makes a line of that horrible anodized aluminum, makes more money by selling cake levelers. Their solution to a pan that doesn't bake properly is to cut off 15% of the top of the poorly baked cake and throw it in the trash.

Cookies fare no better. They bake hard and crusty on the bottom, so never chewy and never spread to the full diameter. Shortbread, which is not suppose to brown, is dark on bottom and sides when baked on anodized aluminumm. Can you tell how much I hate the stuff lol.

The bakeware metal is so important--a major tool selection that many bakers just don’t think through.

Anyway, glad your cookies turn out. What flavor ice cream did you use in your sandwiches?
 
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i’m glad the cookies turned out. 375°F for 7 1/2 minutes I actually longer than I would have thought for a 1/8” sliced cookie. But that shows you the importance of needing to work out the temperature and time specific to your oven.

Parrish Magic Line and Volrath are both excellent pans. When it comes to cake, there is a reason Parrish has a cult following among cake bakers. That uncoated metal gives better control; their square pan produces sharp edges; uncoated metal produces a white cake without that dreaded dried out brown crust. And their removable bottom pans are genius.


They don't advertise--they don’t even have a website. Yet, every cake baker knows and uses Parrish.

I’m with you on Fat Daddio--I just hate that brand. That bakeware roasts everything. Cakes set too quickly on the edges, then dome and frequently crack in the center. What baffles me is bakers think its perfectly normal for a cake to volcano in the center. Instead of manufacturing a proper baking pan, Wilton, who also makes a line of that horrible anodized aluminum, makes more money by selling cake levelers. Their solution to a pan that doesn't bake properly is to cut off 15% of the top of the poorly baked cake and throw it in the trash.

Cookies fare no better. They bake hard and crusty on the bottom, so never chewy and never spread to the full diameter. Shortbread, which is not suppose to brown, is dark on bottom and sides when baked on anodized aluminumm. Can you tell how much I hate the stuff lol.

The bakeware metal is so important--a major tool selection that many bakers just don’t think through.

Anyway, glad your cookies turn out. What flavor ice cream did you use in your sandwiches?
Since these were more of a cookie base test, I used whatever ice cream was in our freezer. Testings all week used black cherry and mint chip. I think Wilton stuff is awful, edible and bakeware. I get perfectly flat cakes in the Magic Line Pans. Thanks again!
 
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Since these were more of a cookie base test, I used whatever ice cream was in our freezer. Testings all week used black cherry and mint chip. I think Wilton stuff is awful, edible and bakeware. I get perfectly flat cakes in the Magic Line Pans. Thanks again!

I don't want to live in a universe without mint chip.

I’ve been thinking a lot about ice cream desserts lately.

I’m thinking about buying an small ice cream maker. Years ago my brother used to make quite a bit of homemade ice cream. I’d like to give it a try.
 
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Totally agree about Mint Chip! My fav. I have a Cuisinart ice cream maker, the kind with the canister you freeze. I love it. It makes about a quart. I make it with Truvia so it's pretty low carb, but it makes great regular ice cream as well. I think you would be happy with it, not too expensive, and then if you are really into it you can get a more expensive professional model. Mine is a much older model than this, but this is to give you an idea of what I have, you can search Cuisinart, or other brands. https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/st...ce=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclsrc=ds&gclsrc=ds
 
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Totally agree about Mint Chip! My fav. I have a Cuisinart ice cream maker, the kind with the canister you freeze. I love it. It makes about a quart. I make it with Truvia so it's pretty low carb, but it makes great regular ice cream as well. I think you would be happy with it, not too expensive, and then if you are really into it you can get a more expensive professional model. Mine is a much older model than this, but this is to give you an idea of what I have, you can search Cuisinart, or other brands. https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/st...ce=c&matchtype=&network=g&gclsrc=ds&gclsrc=ds
My late mother-in-law had that little Cuisinart machine and she really liked it.

I don’t wanna get anything too big, because counter space is at a premium now. I have so much baking/cooking equipment it’s insane.

Last year my youngest son moved into his own place for the first time. He texted to asked if I had any extra kitchenware. I texted back telling him that was like asking if there was any water in the sea. I filled his cupboards with everything he needed--yet it barely made a dent in my cupboards. I have multiples of everything.

But I’ve been wanting an ice cream maker for some time.

how is the texture of the ice cream using the artificial sweetener? Does it crystallize?
 
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I have doubles and triples of some of my pans, and gadgets, too. The ice cream made with Truvia is a little on the hard side, but I wouldn't say it's icy. I buy Rebel low-carb ice cream (I'm in NJ, not sure if that's available where you are) and it's rock hard. Microwave the pint for about 20 seconds, and it's softened up nicely. You would have to do the same for your home-made. The best low carb ice cream I've tried is Enlightened pints, still microwave it for about 15 -20 seconds, but once it's softened, it's just like eating any regular ice cream. I treat myself to a pint about once a week.

Regarding the ice cream sandwich cookies, although the rolled sugar cookie recipe is good, I was still on my quest for a soft store-bought like texture. I found it in my trove of Cook's Illustrated annuals. July/August 2002. Oh. My. God. It's a little thicker than I would like, about 1/4 inch, but the texture is IT. Sticks to your fingers a bit, soft and chewy, nice chocolate flavor but doesn't overpower the ice cream. Almost brownie-like, but not that moist or fudgy. I made a scaled batch yesterday in my 6x6 Magic Line pan to test my sprinkle theory - coating the edges of the ice cream gets messy. Here is my test result, absolutely perfect, and look at those square corners, LOL. The sprinkles stayed on top, didn't sink in, and adhered without not a one falling off. Success, yet again! : )
 

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I have doubles and triples of some of my pans, and gadgets, too. The ice cream made with Truvia is a little on the hard side, but I wouldn't say it's icy. I buy Rebel low-carb ice cream (I'm in NJ, not sure if that's available where you are) and it's rock hard. Microwave the pint for about 20 seconds, and it's softened up nicely. You would have to do the same for your home-made. The best low carb ice cream I've tried is Enlightened pints, still microwave it for about 15 -20 seconds, but once it's softened, it's just like eating any regular ice cream. I treat myself to a pint about once a week.

Regarding the ice cream sandwich cookies, although the rolled sugar cookie recipe is good, I was still on my quest for a soft store-bought like texture. I found it in my trove of Cook's Illustrated annuals. July/August 2002. Oh. My. God. It's a little thicker than I would like, about 1/4 inch, but the texture is IT. Sticks to your fingers a bit, soft and chewy, nice chocolate flavor but doesn't overpower the ice cream. Almost brownie-like, but not that moist or fudgy. I made a scaled batch yesterday in my 6x6 Magic Line pan to test my sprinkle theory - coating the edges of the ice cream gets messy. Here is my test result, absolutely perfect, and look at those square corners, LOL. The sprinkles stayed on top, didn't sink in, and adhered without not a one falling off. Success, yet again! : )


I know Rebel. I used to live in DC. My ex is from NJ. My stepdaughters live in South NJ. Rebel ice cream cakes were a standard in our house.

Yes, you can’t beat Magic Pan for sharp edges. The color of your sprinkles held too.
 
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I buy my sprinkles as solid color jars from a local candy making/cake decorating shop and mix my own colors. They taste better than the crappy mixed containers you buy in the grocery store or WalMart. That silly color combination was left over sprinkles I had from 2 other baking projects. LOL.
 
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I buy my sprinkles as solid color jars from a local candy making/cake decorating shop and mix my own colors. They taste better than the crappy mixed containers you buy in the grocery store or WalMart. That silly color combination was left over sprinkles I had from 2 other baking projects. LOL.

The walmart sprinkles hold the color when baked, but you’re right, taste like crap. My favorite cake supply shop closed during the pandemic lockdown. And just before the pandemic, the kitchenware store in town was sold. The original owner focused on the caters and restaurant owners. So he carried everything you could want or need. The new owner gutted the inventory. Now I have to drive two counties over for supplies.
 
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My candy supply stores are about 45 minutes east or west of me, so I plan my trips wisely with the price of gas! But I am grateful to have 2 supply stores to get the good ingredients, they both sell Merckens and Wilbur melting wafers. I would never buy Wilton, pure garbage.
 

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