Chocolate Bloom

Discussion in 'Disaster Help' started by Donna1786, Jul 22, 2019.

  1. Donna1786

    Donna1786 New Member

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    I am having trouble when covering my traybakes (millionaires shortbread, tiffin & marsbar slice) with chocolate, that spots are appearing. I have looked this up and found it's called chocolate Bloom. Not much advice apart from melting back down, which I can't do when it's already on a traybake. I have tried to stop overmelting the chocolate and getting it too hot, if there are a few Lumps still in there I mix until they melt. (I melt in the microwave, does that make a difference?)

    I have stopped refrigerating it to set, as not to shock it with extreme temperatures. I dont have a nice cool dark larder, so I have put it under a cake box whe setting and kept windows closed so there isn't moisture in the air. It hasn't gone really white this time, do it's an improvement, but still the spots!!! I am at a loss of what to do.

    Is the cocoa solids percentage and milk solids percentage a factor? I have been using milk chocolate but is dark chocolate better?
    Help please? Thanks
     
    Donna1786, Jul 22, 2019
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  2. Donna1786

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Milk chocolate has a lower tempering temperature than dark chocolate; one chocolate is not better than the other rather it’s a matter of heating to the correct temperature. Tempering chocolate is an exacting disciple.

    And so far as chocolate bloom there’s two types of bloom: fat bloom and sugar bloom. You need to determine the type of bloom. Fat bloom can be fixed. Sugar bloom can’t.

    Sugar bloom is caused when the sugar in the chocolate crystallizes. This is usually caused when the chocolate has been exposed to condensation or humid environment. Chocolate should never be put in the refrigerator.

    I had a long discussion on chocolate with another baker recently. There’s detailed information on tempering and bloom on that thread. If after reading it you have more questions let me know.


    https://www.baking-forums.com/threads/florentines-succesfully-made.5444/#post-38746
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 22, 2019
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  3. Donna1786

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Although these pages to Callebaut are geared toward chocolate tempered for used in molded chocolates the principles in tempering and storage remain the same. They’re the same principles I was taught in chocolate classes for baking and they’re the same ones are use I’m dipping my baked cookies.


    But I would encourage you to read the thread I linked above as well since it includes discussion on tempering temperatures as well as the science behind tempering. It really helps to understand what tempering is and why it has to be done. Chocolate is an expensive ingredient, so the more you understand about it, the more you’re able to work with that successfully.




    Tempering chocolate in the microwave


    https://www.callebaut.com/en-US/chocolate-video/technique/tempering/microwave



    Fixing chocolate when it’s too thick (over crystallized, not overheated and burned; if chocolate has been overheated, nothing will fix it)


    https://www.callebaut.com/en-GB/chocolate-video/technique/tempering/overcrystallised




    Troubleshooting chocolate

    https://www.callebaut.com/en-US/chocolate-technique/troubleshooting/chocolate-bloom



    Sugar Bloom


    https://www.callebaut.com/en-US/chocolate-technique/troubleshooting/chocolate-bloom



    Fat Bloom


    https://www.callebaut.com/en-US/chocolate-video/technique/prevent-fatbloom
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 22, 2019
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  4. Donna1786

    Donna1786 New Member

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    Thank you so much for your advice. That is really helpful.

    Especially the link about tempering chocolate in the microwave . I have used a lower power setting on my microwave and taken better care of regularly opening the door and mixing.

    I am also making sure I store it in a dry cool dark place as much as possible.

    Touch wood, but I have had success my last few attempts.
    All your other links are great too.

    Cheers Donna
     
    Donna1786, Jul 28, 2019
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    Norcalbaker59 likes this.
  5. Donna1786

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    I’m glad to hear you’re finding success with your chocolate Donna. The rules of chocolate can seem daunting, but once you know the rules and with a bit of practice, success is the rule rather than the exception.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 28, 2019
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