DIY Chocapic Cereal

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HI

I joined this forum because i need help in making this homemade cereal recipe:

Bake your own Chocapic breakfast cereal​

Ingredients​

  • For the chocolate petals
  • 70 g Wholegrain wheat flour (dry ingredient)
  • 2.5 tbsp Corn starch (dry ingredient)
  • 3 tsp Cocoa (dry ingredient)
  • 0.25 tsp Sodium bicarbonate (dry ingredient)
  • 50 ml Water (wet ingredient)
  • 1 tbsp Sugar (wet ingredient)
  • 0.5 tbsp Oil (wet ingredient)
  • 0.25 tsp Salt (wet ingredient)
  • For the coating
  • 4 tsp Sugar
  • 0.5 tbsp Cocoa
  • 0.25 tsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Boiling water

Instructions​

Chocolate petals

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Weigh out the dry ingredients and sieve into a mixing bowl.
  3. In a mixing cup, measure the wet ingredients and stir until all solids are dissolved.
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix, knead slightly to form a homogenous dough (do not over-mix as this will lead to less rise during baking and hard texture in finished product).
  5. Divide the dough into two balls, wrap in cling film and leave to rest in a fridge for 20 minutes (this allows the dough to relax and reduce shrinkage during rolling).
  6. Take the first dough ball out of the fridge, flatten into a disk and dust both sides with a little corn starch.
  7. Roll out the disk into a circle around 20cm in diameter (approximately 2mm thick), cut out as many petal shapes as possible using the cutter provide.
  8. Arrange cut petals around the edge of a baking tray to give a curved shape after baking.
  9. Repeat the same process for the second dough ball.
  10. Bake at 160°C for 10 minutes in a fan oven.
  11. Allow to cool after baking.
  12. Weigh 50 g of the baked chocolate petals, put aside for coating.
Chocolate Coating

  1. Mix sugar, cocoa and vanilla together and remove any lumps, add the boiling water and stir until solids are fully dissolved, use immediately (if slurry has cooled down too much, microwave for a few seconds without boiling).
  2. Place 50g of the baked chocolate petals in a mixing bowl, drizzle 2 ½ teaspoon of the hot slurry, stir continuously with a spoon until all petals are coated thoroughly (minimum 1 minute).
  3. Spread coated petals on a baking tray lined with a sheet of non-stick paper and bake at 100°C for 15 minutes.
I tried converting it myself it's just impossible to figure this out.

Can anyone in this site help me?
 
Joined
Jan 12, 2020
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HI

I joined this forum because i need help in making this homemade cereal recipe:

Bake your own Chocapic breakfast cereal​

Ingredients​

  • For the chocolate petals
  • 70 g Wholegrain wheat flour (dry ingredient)
  • 2.5 tbsp Corn starch (dry ingredient)
  • 3 tsp Cocoa (dry ingredient)
  • 0.25 tsp Sodium bicarbonate (dry ingredient)
  • 50 ml Water (wet ingredient)
  • 1 tbsp Sugar (wet ingredient)
  • 0.5 tbsp Oil (wet ingredient)
  • 0.25 tsp Salt (wet ingredient)
  • For the coating
  • 4 tsp Sugar
  • 0.5 tbsp Cocoa
  • 0.25 tsp Vanilla
  • 2 tbsp Boiling water

Instructions​

Chocolate petals

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 160°C.
  2. Weigh out the dry ingredients and sieve into a mixing bowl.
  3. In a mixing cup, measure the wet ingredients and stir until all solids are dissolved.
  4. Add the wet ingredients to the dry ingredients and mix, knead slightly to form a homogenous dough (do not over-mix as this will lead to less rise during baking and hard texture in finished product).
  5. Divide the dough into two balls, wrap in cling film and leave to rest in a fridge for 20 minutes (this allows the dough to relax and reduce shrinkage during rolling).
  6. Take the first dough ball out of the fridge, flatten into a disk and dust both sides with a little corn starch.
  7. Roll out the disk into a circle around 20cm in diameter (approximately 2mm thick), cut out as many petal shapes as possible using the cutter provide.
  8. Arrange cut petals around the edge of a baking tray to give a curved shape after baking.
  9. Repeat the same process for the second dough ball.
  10. Bake at 160°C for 10 minutes in a fan oven.
  11. Allow to cool after baking.
  12. Weigh 50 g of the baked chocolate petals, put aside for coating.
Chocolate Coating

  1. Mix sugar, cocoa and vanilla together and remove any lumps, add the boiling water and stir until solids are fully dissolved, use immediately (if slurry has cooled down too much, microwave for a few seconds without boiling).
  2. Place 50g of the baked chocolate petals in a mixing bowl, drizzle 2 ½ teaspoon of the hot slurry, stir continuously with a spoon until all petals are coated thoroughly (minimum 1 minute).
  3. Spread coated petals on a baking tray lined with a sheet of non-stick paper and bake at 100°C for 15 minutes.
I tried converting it myself it's just impossible to figure this out.

Can anyone in this site help me?
What do you mean convert ?
From what to what?.
 
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I want to convert metric to imperial. I tried to convert it myself but it's impossible

Can you help me please?

You cannot covert. Imperial measurement is volume—the measure of how much space something takes up.

Metric is the weight.

The granules of flour, cocoa power, cornstarch sugar, etc. all have different mass.

Think of it like this, sand has a different mass from sugar. Significantly less sand will fit in a “cup” of sugar. More important, the weight of sand and sugar is significantly different.

There is no standard for a “cup” of flour or sugar in baking. A cup of plain flour can be anything from 120 g - 150 g. Wholemeal flour weighs more than plain flour, so that’s another problem.

Baking is a chemical reaction of all the ingredients to temperature in time. So the ratio of ingredients to the flour is critical. That is why baking is done in weight, not volume measurement.

This recipe with its hodgepodge of metric weight and volume measurement will probably not produce good results.
 
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You cannot covert. Imperial measurement is volume—the measure of how much space something takes up.

Metric is the weight.

The granules of flour, cocoa power, cornstarch sugar, etc. all have different mass.

Think of it like this, sand has a different mass from sugar. Significantly less sand will fit in a “cup” of sugar. More important, the weight of sand and sugar is significantly different.

There is no standard for a “cup” of flour or sugar in baking. A cup of plain flour can be anything from 120 g - 150 g. Wholemeal flour weighs more than plain flour, so that’s another problem.

Baking is a chemical reaction of all the ingredients to temperature in time. So the ratio of ingredients to the flour is critical. That is why baking is done in weight, not volume measurement.

This recipe with its hodgepodge of metric weight and volume measurement will probably not produce good results.
Well, all I know is baking with measuring cups and spoons. I know absolute zilch on ingredient volume.
 
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You cannot covert. Imperial measurement is volume—the measure of how much space something takes up.

Metric is the weight.

The granules of flour, cocoa power, cornstarch sugar, etc. all have different mass.

Think of it like this, sand has a different mass from sugar. Significantly less sand will fit in a “cup” of sugar. More important, the weight of sand and sugar is significantly different.

There is no standard for a “cup” of flour or sugar in baking. A cup of plain flour can be anything from 120 g - 150 g. Wholemeal flour weighs more than plain flour, so that’s another problem.

Baking is a chemical reaction of all the ingredients to temperature in time. So the ratio of ingredients to the flour is critical. That is why baking is done in weight, not volume measurement.

This recipe with its hodgepodge of metric weight and volume measurement will probably not produce good results.

Imperial pint is 20 fl oz compared to 16 oz in America.

The rest is the same far as i know, a pound is still a pound , but they went metric yrs ago.
So it had to be convertible because thats what they did.
 
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Well, all I know is baking with measuring cups and spoons. I know absolute zilch on ingredient volume.
Its simple if you have a good scale, just measure your ingredient by cups and transfer it to the scale, weigh it, write it down.
Thats it.

You can also just type "convert imperial to metric" in google and it will do it for you.
 
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Imperial pint is 20 fl oz compared to 16 oz in America.

The rest is the same far as i know, a pound is still a pound , but they went metric yrs ago.
So it had to be convertible because thats what they did.
Bob's red mill already converted the recipe. I asked every baking site I know because I just want to know who will help me. My internet social skills suck :(
 

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