Soft fluffy buttermilk rolls


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my SIL loves super soft bread. So yesterday I developed a buttermilk recipe, using a 24hr poolish. This was the first test, but pleased with the results.


Pull apart rolls. Nice texture
C6473C81-E487-41B5-BB75-12500D18DC22.jpeg


Good rise and fluffy crumb
F7CD4C99-2CED-4A77-A133-DB645BB9D841.jpeg


Pillowy soft
CC95C860-44E7-4C64-8FC0-F4B3E5A96991.jpeg


Then springs back nicely
8ECA6317-380B-4193-B9D1-5611F013B4C2.jpeg
 
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Those look delicious! :D I love it when bread is so soft that you get those little flaps when you tear it apart. I bet they would make a great iced bun (do you have those in the US?!).

Can you share the recipe?
 
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Those look delicious! :D I love it when bread is so soft that you get those little flaps when you tear it apart. I bet they would make a great iced bun (do you have those in the US?!).

Can you share the recipe?

Becky, I’m not familiar with the iced bun. Is it like a cream tea? Oh how I love anything topped with clotted cream. But nothing beats a perfectly baked scone with more clotted cream than one should be allowed in a single sitting. Sigh! I do miss the delights of wheat baked goods.


The buttermilk roll recipe is below. I’m quite pleased with dough. Super fluffy. Soft, but springy. I don’t think it needs much in the way of a tweak. This was one of those rare occasions where the recipe worked perfectly first go.

I tend to go light on salt, so if anything a tad more salt. I’ll bake a batch for my SIL next week, so I’ll know then how the flavor is.


This dough makes 18 rolls. I used a 9” x 13” (23cm x 33cm) pan which held 15 rolls. To bake all 18 rolls, two 8” (20cm) pans would be needed.

I created such a large batch of dough as a first step in developing a sandwich roll unique to San Francisco, called Dutch Crunch. Given the size of the sandwich rolls I will make, I’ll need a good bit of dough.

I’ll scale this to 15 rolls in the future as it will be my standard herb dinner roll recipe. In the past I’ve used a different dinner roll recipe every time as I was never happy with the results. I think the key was a 24 hr poolish. It took the texture and rise exactly where I wanted it.

Article on Dutch Crunch if you’re interested.

http://www.foodandwine.com/fwx/food/dutch-crunch-best-sandwich-bread-youve-never-heard



Buttermilk Pull Apart Rolls
Yield: 18 rolls

Poolish - 24 hrs preferment
  • 200g water, 90°F (48°C)
  • 1 tsp cane sugar C&H cane sugar
  • 1/4 tsp active yeast Red Star
  • 200 g unbleached bread flour (13.5% protein) organic Central Milling High Mountain High Gluten

Mix sugar into water. Sprinkle yeast into water and let sit to dissolve.

Place flour into large bowl,

Mix in yeast water. Loosely cover with plastic wrap and place in a warm draft free spot overnight or up to 24 hrs. I place in an off oven with the oven light on.



Main Dough
  • 40g water, 90°F (48°C)
  • 1 tsp sugar C&H cane sugar
  • 1 1/2 tsp active dry yeast Red Star
  • 380g unbleached plain flour (11.5% protein) organic Central Milling Artisan Baker’s Craft
  • 50g sugar C&H cane sugar
  • 8g (1 1/2 tsp) salt (.015)
  • 150ml buttermilk, room temperature, local organic brand
  • 53g (1 large) egg, slightly beaten, room temperature
  • 50g butter, room temperature local organic brand
Egg wash
  • 1 egg
  • 2 tsp water

I always top dinner rolls with butter or infused oil, herbs, and a sprinkle of good cheese for extra flavor.


Topping if desired
  • 3-4 TBSP garlic infused olive oil or melted
  • 2-3 TBSP fresh herbs minced, I like parsley, chives, thyme
  • 1/4 cup finely grated cheese. I like parmigiana, pecorino, or asiago



Method

Mix sugar into water

Sprinkle yeast over sugar water and let sit 10 minutes


In mixer bowl thoroughly whisk dry ingredients to ensure salt and sugar is dispersed.


Attach dough hook to mixer

Make a well in flour

Place poolish into well of flour


Low speed mix poolish into flour until most of it is combine.


Scrape down sides and bottom


Add dissolved yeast and mix on low until just combined


Scrape down sides and bottom


Add buttermilk and mix for 1 minute


Scrape down dough hook, sides and bottom

With mixer on low, slowly pour in egg.

Increase speed to med-low (KitchenAid #4) mix 1 minute

Scrape down dough hook, sides and bottom

On med-low (KitchenAid #4) add butter in 3 additions, scrape hook and bowl as needed

Continue mixing until dough reaches windowpane stage. It took about 4 minutes mixing.

Dough will have pulled away from the sides of the bowl, but may stick some to the bottom of bowl.

Transfer dough to large oiled container. Dough will be sticky, so use wet hands and bowl scraper.

Loosely cover container with plastic wrap and place in warm draft free spot. I use off oven with oven light on.

While dough rises lightly oil two 8” (20cm) pans or 9” x 13” (23cm x 33cm).

When dough looks doubled in volume, poke with oiled finger. Dough is ready when indentation remains. Do not punch down.

Turn dough out into lightly floured work surface. Do not punch down.

Gently pat in rectangle shape shape. With bench scraper, cut into 18 equal portions (approx 60g each).

Take one piece at a time. Very lightly dust with flour. Gently pat each piece into a strip 6” x 2.5” (15cm x 7cm). Dough strips may be formed using a rolling pin. But use an extremely light touch.

Brush off any excess flour.

From 2.5” (7cm) side, gently roll up dough into a cylinder. Place seam side down in oiled pan.

If using a rectangle pan, line up in rows, leaving an a bit of space between each row. (Note: I only baked 15 rolls in the pan since I wanted to use the remainder for an experiment. 15 filled the pan perfectly)

If using round pans, place seven cylinders of dough lengthwise around the pan and two cylinders in the center. (NOTE: I did not use a round pan, but this is how I would arrange the dough).

Loosely cover with plastic wrap. Place in warm draft free spot. Let rise until dough looks nearly doubled in size. With oiled finger gently press on dough. If imprint slowly and only partially springs back, dough is ready to bake. If no imprint holds in dough, it is under proof. Continue to proof. If dough is soft and squishy, it is over proofed.

While dough proofs, preheat oven to 375°F (190°C)

5 minutes before baking brush rolls with light coat of egg wash and let sit. Then brush with a light second coat of egg wash just before placing in oven.

Bake for approximately 18 minutes to internal temperature of 185°F (85°C).

If desired, while rolls are still warm, brush with infused oil or melted butter. Sprinkle with fresh chopped herbs and finely grated cheese.
 
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Becky, I’m not familiar with the iced bun. Is it like a cream tea? Oh how I love anything topped with clotted cream. But nothing beats a perfectly baked scone with more clotted cream than one should be allowed in a single sitting.

It is a soft bread roll (often brioche but not necessarily) topped with icing (made from powdered sugar and water) - they look like this:

5052449794342_280_IDShot_3.jpeg


Simple but delicious! :) They don't usually feature in afternoon tea, it's more of a casual snack. I'm with you re clotted cream on scones though, it's such a decadent treat :D

Thanks very much for the recipe, I look forward to giving it a try. I wonder if I could make it dairy free by substituting the buttermilk for some non-dairy yoghurt... If I do, I'll let you know how it goes.


I'd not heard of Dutch Crunch by that name, I know it as tiger bread. It's very popular over here, and so yummy! I hope your experiment goes well.
 
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It is a soft bread roll (often brioche but not necessarily) topped with icing (made from powdered sugar and water) - they look like this:

View attachment 1561

Simple but delicious! :) They don't usually feature in afternoon tea, it's more of a casual snack. I'm with you re clotted cream on scones though, it's such a decadent treat :D

Thanks very much for the recipe, I look forward to giving it a try. I wonder if I could make it dairy free by substituting the buttermilk for some non-dairy yoghurt... If I do, I'll let you know how it goes.



I'd not heard of Dutch Crunch by that name, I know it as tiger bread. It's very popular over here, and so yummy! I hope your experiment goes well.

Ohh that iced bun looks yummy. This buttermilk roll would probably translate nicely to an iced bun. Less rich than brioche, but soft and fluffy enough to make a nice version.

I don’t see any obstacle to converting the buttermilk dough into a non-dairy one. I only used buttermilk as a flavor enhancer. There’s no other reason for that choice of liquid.

Let me know if you revise it. I made a poolish last night. Going to attempt a San Francisco Dutch Crunch roll with the dough today.
 
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Sounds great, looking forward to hearing how they turn out :)

Becky, wow, did I learned a lot from the test! I'm babysitting my niece at my brother's house, so I don't have the device with the pics. to post now. But when I'm totally done with the project I will write a post with all test pics.

There is so little information on San Francisco Dutch Crunch. Bakeries in SF closely guard their Dutch Crunch recipes. So the very few recipes out there are based on the European tiger bread. Judging from appearances, they are definitely not SF Dutch Crunch.

I found a reference to a recipe that was published some years ago by a local magazine that focused on west coast food and gardening. But the original recipe isn't in their archives. The two references I found have significant differences in the mixture used for the crust treatment. So I made an educated guess on what to use for the crust treatment mixture. I ended up with rolls that look like the pics I've seen on the internet--which is not the way a SF Dutch Crunch roll looks. But on the plus side, the crust treatment produced a very crunchy top. So the mixture is in the wheelhouse.

I sat down and went through the entire recipe I created. Then I compared it to the basics in bread science, looked at what hydration, fat, and protein do to a dough. I made notes on what I'm going to revise for test 2. I have a full couple of weeks ahead of me, so I won't have a chance to work on this project again until mid May.
 
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It all sounds intriguing! Out of curiosity, how does Dutch Crunch differ from Tiger Bread?
 
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It all sounds intriguing! Out of curiosity, how does Dutch Crunch differ from Tiger Bread?

Becky, shape and texture are two differences. Dutch Crunch is always rectangular; the crackle top is striated rather than splotchy; the cracks thin and long rather than wide.

This is a photo of a bread recipe on Recipe Genius. It is not Dutch Crunch even though the recipe poster labels it as such.
D9E72662-BFAB-4376-ADFF-7136679660EA.jpeg




This is Dutch Crunch. This is a photo from a local bakery. That crackle top is so amazing. This is how San Francisco Dutch Crunch looks.
D498F3CB-513E-47E9-9474-5E149DC5E2EA.jpeg
 
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Ah I see, thanks for the clarification. I'm definitely more familiar with the splotchy type, as far as I know I've not seen proper Dutch Crunch before. Makes me want to go back to SF so I can try it, I feel like I missed out!
 
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Ah I see, thanks for the clarification. I'm definitely more familiar with the splotchy type, as far as I know I've not seen proper Dutch Crunch before. Makes me want to go back to SF so I can try it, I feel like I missed out!

I’ll update my progress as I work through it.

Today is cupcake day. My 5 yr old niece loves to bake. So we are baking chocolate cupcakes today.
 
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