Sponge biscuits misbehave

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Just made a bavarois; we thought to have followed the recipe exactly, lining the floor of the container with sponge biscuits but, when the bavarois was poured into the tin, the biscuits came floating up to the surface. It didn’t spoil the taste, but the look would appeal to a dog at dinner time!

Any thoughts?
 
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The recipe I followed suggested all the whipping should be done with an electric beater; I now wonder if that caused the problem: the initial mix was extremely airy and light (almost like a Floating Island texture through which the sponge biscuits were able to rise).

I have since seen a recipe (
) where the chef whisks everything very gently with a balloon whisk and achieves perfect results.

Have any of you experienced this problem?
 
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temperature is the enemy, everything has to cool enough that the whipped cream doesn't melt.
It (the base) should not have any perceptible warth, feel the bottom of the bowl, it should be below body temp which would make it feel quite cool.

It should start setting as you blend everything. The cold of the whipped cream will start to set the gelatin so you have to get it into the molds pronto. If you do that the base will never float up.
 
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temperature is the enemy, everything has to cool enough that the whipped cream doesn't melt.
It (the base) should not have any perceptible warth, feel the bottom of the bowl, it should be below body temp which would make it feel quite cool.

It should start setting as you blend everything. The cold of the whipped cream will start to set the gelatin so you have to get it into the molds pronto. If you do that the base will never float up.
Thank you for a reply that comes in really good time a I have been asked to have another go at a bavarois the day after tomorrow!
 
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if it turns out liquidy again remove the sponges and use them on top after pouring the filling, then just flip upside down after it sets up.

I made a video to demonstrate the critical temperatures for mousses, its the same for any similar type.
Used choc mousse for this example.

the temperature before the whipped cream was added was below 80f (I know this because the cream didn't melt).
the temperature after the whipped cream was folded in was down to 64F and it was setting firm already,
theres no way whipped cream can melt at that temp,
above 80F is a problem.

 
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I made a video to demonstrate the critical temperatures for mousses, its the same for any similar type.

We much enjoyed the slick video you made with the help of the hard-working Kitty (I am glad “she approved” ... even though she didn’t get as much as a little lick).

It was impressive to watch you beating in the egg-whites without beating about the bush and with no deflation, as well as not needing to clean the bowl before adding and whipping the cream (fortune favours the masters!).

And what a nifty tool, that temperature gun (I must get one – it will be handy to take Mrs BakingBad’s temperature when she gets hot under the collar (mind you, the kitchen can never be too hot in these days of energy shortage).

We will keep you in mind tomorrow.
 
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you can whip cream on top of whites but never after whipping yolks, the yolk will turn whipped cream to slush.

the video you posted was good but too vague as far as temps go, hot , warm and cool are subjective terms.

In a nutshell, if the base is still hotter than 80F stop and put the cream away until it gets closer to 70F, then go ahead.
 
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you can whip cream on top of whites but never after whipping yolks, the yolk will turn whipped cream to slush.

the video you posted was good but too vague as far as temps go, hot , warm and cool are subjective terms.

In a nutshell, if the base is still hotter than 80F stop and put the cream away until it gets closer to 70F, then go ahead.
 
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My say-so would mean nothing, were it not that Mrs BB approved in full.

I told her I could not have done it without following retired baker’s advice.

The proof of the pudding is in the picture; you may be intrigued by the piped cream – I tried to “spoon” those oblong squeezed-egg shapes they do in videos but the cream stuck to the spoon and when I tried to “slide” it off, it broke up; so, in the piping syringe it went! ... Any thoughts on that?

1669654587816.jpeg
 
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those bowls look expensive.
Intriguing that you should comment on those bowls! I witnessed many-a-dessert consumed in them in my youth abroad without ever realising that they were English!

Funnily enough, they have no commercial worth but are of inestimable psychological value; they were made by Alfred Meakin Pottery, circa 1940’s and ...
... [What follows is not really applicable to a Baking-forum and I hope it will forgive the irrelevance:] I inherited those plates from the woman who created the Snoecks Almanac, originally a rather highbrow literary magazine whose publication led her to frequent all manner of prestigious contributors; my very own young eyes saw, eating from those bowls, Georges Simenon (Maigret), Hergé (Tintin), Jacques Brel (Ne me Quitte Pas), Maeterlinck (Pelléas et Mélisande), Jean Cocteau, Picasso, and many others. These inexpensive vessels have in that sense become priceless (albeit just to me).

Of course, I cannot know who used which plate and, even if I did, all evidence of it would have been washed away by the passing of time’s waves ...
 
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Take one to antique roadshow, you never know....they look pricey.
Yes, it’s odd, they do not seem to have retained any value, you can get them on Ebay: four bowls for £17; although those are Harmony “Solway” Pattern, as opposed to mine which are Harmony “Solent” – not sure what the difference is (below, with a mark which is difficult to pin down as either 13, 43, or 73, depending on which plate you look at).

But I wouldn’t sell them. Our children may one day; the bowls have no sentimental value for them: they have barely even heard of the people who have eaten off them.
1669984196747.jpeg
 
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I made a video to demonstrate the critical temperatures for mousses

I meant to ask you: Have you made a video about puff pastry?

There is a lot of it on YouTube, but there are many discrepancies and differences of opinion; Mrs BB and I found your video on chocolate mousse very inspiring.

My pastries are always good, except puff which ALWAYS defeats me ... apart from anything else I find that, after the third turn, if working straight from the fridge, the parcel becomes incredible stiff and tough to roll; but if I wait a bit, some butter tends to seep through the flour.

Recently, I saw that in America they add a bit of flour to the beurrage; do you have an opinion on that? Also, do you recommend strong or ordinary plain flour? Do you recommend ordinary butter, or strong Normandy butter?

Looking forward.
 
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I meant to ask you: Have you made a video about puff pastry?

There is a lot of it on YouTube, but there are many discrepancies and differences of opinion; Mrs BB and I found your video on chocolate mousse very inspiring.

My pastries are always good, except puff which ALWAYS defeats me ... apart from anything else I find that, after the third turn, if working straight from the fridge, the parcel becomes incredible stiff and tough to roll; but if I wait a bit, some butter tends to seep through the flour.

Recently, I saw that in America they add a bit of flour to the beurrage; do you have an opinion on that? Also, do you recommend strong or ordinary plain flour? Do you recommend ordinary butter, or strong Normandy butter?

Looking forward.
yes people didn't believe I do it so fast. Thats because they follow the followers.

I pound the butter with flour, just to prevent the baton from sticking to the butter, I don't intentionally mix flour and butter, you can but the flour will warm the butter so best not.

So i made videos where I start with ingredients on the table, no editing, no 15 min stop or chilling the dough between folds.
It takes less than 25 minutes from start to complete 1200+ layers.
A blend of strong and weak flour makes a big difference in the final product, if you don't weaken the flour the baked dough will be brittle and hard . I like 60% bread flour and 40% cake flour.
I buy cheap uns butter, fancy isn't necessary, food snobbery ruins many a baker.

An infra red temp gun is your friend, butter melts at 80F+ so if you keep the temp of the dough appreciably lower there is no danger of melting , chilling between folds would have a counter effect and set you back.
In a 70F kitchen, using cold tap water, the final dough temp is quite cool 65F I recall.
64F butter cannot melt. The dough will relax faster at those temps compared to chilling it.

This video is for reverse puff, the butter is on the outside, its a bit more finicky to get going but once you have 2 folds its the same as regular puff, reverse has benefits over regular puff, you can do it either way with the same recipe, regular puff would be easier for you to start off. Either way, pay attention to timing and temperatures, don't make the dough too dry or you'll have a hard job rolling it, soft and supple but not sticky and pay attention to how long I mix it, don't mix into a smooth bread type dough.
Avoid kneading the dough, just mix it together to a cogent type pie dough....2 minutes on the machine on slow.
PS. I was born and raised in Manchester, UK.

 
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Thank you for posting this intriguing video where you make it all look so easy. It won’t be long before we try it, but I already anticipate the challenges when our dough gets too stiff or the butter perniciously seeps through, and us saying to each other How on earth does HE do it!?!?!?

It is amazing how, with a sleight of hand, you turn what starts as a rather lumpy mess into a beautiful supple and silky dough. Quite remarkable.

Also, the degree (no pun intended) of steadiness in the temperature of the materials! How do they not gradually warm up? It would be interesting to know, in that context, what the temperature was in your room; is that why you mention Manchester, evoking the latitudes of the frozen north?

Also, that quite a rolling pin you have there! ... you don’t see those in the cartoons...

Anyway, all this brings to mind Captain Haddock’s dismay at NOT having changed water into wine, when he’d seen the magician do it with such ease at the music hall:
1670156787860.png
 
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Thank you for posting this intriguing video where you make it all look so easy. It won’t be long before we try it, but I already anticipate the challenges when our dough gets too stiff or the butter perniciously seeps through, and us saying to each other How on earth does HE do it!?!?!?

It is amazing how, with a sleight of hand, you turn what starts as a rather lumpy mess into a beautiful supple and silky dough. Quite remarkable.

Also, the degree (no pun intended) of steadiness in the temperature of the materials! How do they not gradually warm up? It would be interesting to know, in that context, what the temperature was in your room; is that why you mention Manchester, evoking the latitudes of the frozen north?

Also, that quite a rolling pin you have there! ... you don’t see those in the cartoons...

Anyway, all this brings to mind Captain Haddock’s dismay at NOT having changed water into wine, when he’d seen the magician do it with such ease at the music hall:
View attachment 4695

The kitchen was 70F all ingredients were 70F , water was cold from the tap and butter was chilled,
final dough temperature cannot go above room temp as long as the law of physics works.
If you leave the dough sitting on the table for 10 hours it will still not be higher than 70F.
Nothing can warm up beyond ambient temps, just be aware how warm your room and table is.
So theres no need to panic and keep chilling the dough.
I don't make it look easy, it is easy, ignore all the baloney on youtube and think it through yourself.

I'll video a batch of regular puff dough, its easier than reverse dough, maybe in a couple of day, doctor visit today.

I also mastered the miracle of turning wine into water.
 
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Keep well. I hope the doctor today advocates wine (in moderation, of course); you will have heard of the French paradox: highest consumption of red wine/lowest incidence of cardiovascular problems in Europe.

Looking forward to the regular puff video.
 
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Keep well. I hope the doctor today advocates wine (in moderation, of course); you will have heard of the French paradox: highest consumption of red wine/lowest incidence of cardiovascular problems in Europe.

Looking forward to the regular puff video.

its uploading to youtube now, the final minute got cut off but its just folding the final turn and wrapping it with plastic.
5 single turns, approx 1500 leaves.

Dough.
440 gr cold water.
10 gr salt
1/4 oil
800 gr flour (I weigh 500 gr bread flour plus 300 gr cake flour).

550 gr cold uns butter for the roll in.
 

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