Tipo 00 flour

Joined
May 17, 2020
Messages
5
Reaction score
0
Hello all!
Anyone know why Caputo 00 milled flour requires temperature of 700F-1000F? If it's milled more finely, won't that crack more starch molecules releasing more simple sugars for browning? Or is it that they aren't adding any extra malt(diastatic) so you need higher temps to achieve browning?

Thanks All!
 
Joined
Jun 22, 2017
Messages
4,069
Reaction score
2,081
Hello all!
Anyone know why Caputo 00 milled flour requires temperature of 700F-1000F? If it's milled more finely, won't that crack more starch molecules releasing more simple sugars for browning? Or is it that they aren't adding any extra malt(diastatic) so you need higher temps to achieve browning?

Thanks All!
I don’t need 700°F Caputo.

Starch molecules don’t crack, you need to understand starch gelatinization.

Wheat has two separate types of starch molecules, amylose and amylopectin. Each starch has its own unique long chain shape. The long chains are held together with hydrogen bonds.

Around 124°F-140°F the starch molecules in the wheat flour expand as starch absorbs more water. At a certain point they expand so much that the hydrogen bonds break apart. As more water replaces the hydrogen bonds, the long chain molecules of amylose and amylopectin begins to form a gel like mass. This is when the thickening property of starch begin to happen. This is what will set the crust. This process is usually complete at about 195°F.

Starch gelatinization happens in all baking, cookies, pie dough, pizza.

Starch retrogradation is the reverse of this. When this begins to happen the effect is drying in baked goods. So we call things stale.

The browning is a result of Maillard reaction, which is a combination of amino acids and reducing sugars. This process starts at over 300°F--long after these starch gelatinalization process is over.

Most wheat just doesn’t have the right combination of amino acids and sugars to produce a the desired browning. Most wheat flour is malted. If you in the US, check the ingredients list on some of the bags in the grocery store next time. You’ll see most of the all purpose flour is malted.
 

Ask a Question

Want to reply to this thread or ask your own question?

You'll need to choose a username for the site, which only take a couple of moments. After that, you can post your question and our members will help you out.

Ask a Question

Members online

No members online now.

Forum statistics

Threads
6,576
Messages
47,328
Members
5,515
Latest member
cleoasc

Latest Threads

Top