Ambient temperature


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How important is ambient temperature in the kitchen/bakery? If it is important, what is the ideal temperature?


Temperature is everything because baking is a chemical reaction of all the ingredients to time and temperature.

Your kitchen temperature is going to fluctuate. There’s no way to keep the constant constant. In the morning the kitchen will be much colder than the afternoon when the oven has been on for hours.


I’ve mentioned in others threads that you commented on the importance of Desired Dough Temperature (DDT). It doesn't matter what the ambient temperature is when mixing your dough/batter; your finished dough temperature will be determined by your liquid temperature based on the calculations using DDT.

Most bread doughs are mixed to 75°F (23°C – 24°C). Batters 68°F (20°C).

But to control fermentation and proofing, you have to control the ambient temperature and humidity. For home bakers this is a challenge since there aren’t many proof boxes for home use available.

If your kitchen is above 80°F (26°C) fermentation/proofing will be a problem.
 
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That explains it then. My finished dough temp was correct but the ambient kitchen temp I know was in the mid 30s c and fluctuating.
 
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That explains it then. My finished dough temp was correct but the ambient kitchen temp I know was in the mid 30s c and fluctuating.
A proofing box is a controlled environment of both temperature and humidity. With time, temperature and humidity you can control the development of yeast in the formula that is developed to produce optimal rise, flavor, and texture with specific protein content, sugar content, type of yeast and content, type of liquid, and content mixed to specific finished dough temperature.

But when left to ferment and proof in an open kitchen where there are no controls over ambient temperature and humidity, all the carefully laid plans can be for naught.
 
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The ambient temperature in the kitchen or bakery is incredibly important! Temperature plays a crucial role not only in ensuring that food is safely prepared, but also it can affect product quality and consistency.

The ideal temperature for food preparation areas should be between 68°F and 75°F (20°C to 24°C). If the temperature rises higher than this range, you risk humidity and moisture levels becoming too high which is bad news for any baked goods. High temperatures can create an environment where food-borne illnesses thrive as well, so anything hotter than 70–75 degrees Fahrenheit (21–24 Celsius) should be avoided.

Additionally, depending on the type of kitchen equipment present – such as air ovens or convection ovens – room temperature impacts how your dough will rise during baking. Dough prefers cooler temperatures since hot temperatures encourage a rapid rise followed by a collapse in texture once it cools back down. For example, if your kitchen tends to get too warm during summer months make sure to use less yeast when preparing bread dough so that it'll take much longer to expand and won't bake up quickly due to external heat sources.
 
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The ambient temperature in the kitchen or bakery is incredibly important! Temperature plays a crucial role not only in ensuring that food is safely prepared, but also it can affect product quality and consistency.

The ideal temperature for food preparation areas should be between 68°F and 75°F (20°C to 24°C). If the temperature rises higher than this range, you risk humidity and moisture levels becoming too high which is bad news for any baked goods. High temperatures can create an environment where food-borne illnesses thrive as well, so anything hotter than 70–75 degrees Fahrenheit (21–24 Celsius) should be avoided.

Additionally, depending on the type of kitchen equipment present – such as air ovens or convection ovens – room temperature impacts how your dough will rise during baking. Dough prefers cooler temperatures since hot temperatures encourage a rapid rise followed by a collapse in texture once it cools back down. For example, if your kitchen tends to get too warm during summer months make sure to use less yeast when preparing bread dough so that it'll take much longer to expand and won't bake up quickly due to external heat sources.

Using the correct yeast is key. Home bakers are told more often than not to use instant yeast. But formula and conditions might be all wrong for it.

Sugar feeds yeast. When it is added to a dough, whether it’s a filling or directly to the dough, the yeast will feed on it. Instant yeast is a strain of yeast that reproduces at a much faster rate than active dry yeast. So added sugar can be detrimental to the quality of dough. When too much yeast develops, it quickly plows through its food source and begins to die off. The dough loses it source of CO2 and gases out. So when sugar is at 10% or more, osmotolerant yeast should be used. Add high fermentation/proofing
temperature to the equation and process just accelerates.

A high starch flour adds to the problem since starch converts to sugar.

Selecting the right yeast for the protein content of the flour and the sugar content is important. It’s not just about how much yeast is in the formula.




Examples of different types of yeast



SAF Red: ascorbic acid*; not osmotolerant; short fermentation time; no rehydration required



SAF Blue: osmotolerant (sugar 10% - 30%); no oxidizing agent*; short fermentation time; no rehydration required



SAF Gold: osmotolerant (sugar 10 - 30%); long fermentation; no oxidizing agent; no rehydration required



SAF Premium: use 30% less yeast; short fermentation; not osmotolerant; no rehydration required; I don’t thing this one has an oxidizing agent...



SAF Active Dry: rehydrate; long fermentation; no oxidizing agent.
 
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How important is ambient temperature in the kitchen/bakery? If it is important, what is the ideal temperature?
it depends what you're doing.
Chocolate work is a different story vs pounding butter for laminated dough.
In a nutshell, if you are comfortable you should be able to do just about anything .
 

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