Fluffy Pure BuckWheat Bread?


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Can also do a starter with the einkorn




 
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If this works, we are going to buy 50lbs of Emmer so we can use a bit for starter :)
That website breadtopia should have some a number of recipes. Also freshloaf.com is a all bread forum. There should be people there with expertise on ancient grains that should be able to work through any issues you might encounter.
 
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Hi Norcalbaker!

Things are working great! Fedex was horrible but Central Milling was great. I baked sourdough over the past two days and my daughter loved it. We are going to order 50lbs now and the next order after this will likely be freight 250lbs+

Here is some extra notes in case it helps anyone else.

1)We have our starter working. We are feeding in a 1:3:3 ratio of starter:new food:water.

2)We are generating too much starter this way but we seem to do fine by feeding it and then refrigerating it.

3)I picked a simple sour dough recipe and it worked fine. There are lots of complex recipes out there and I felt overwhelmed with them.

4)We are supposed to leave it on a rack for 1 hour after baking but my kids like straight out of the oven.

5)I am doing all the mixing and fermenting in the afternoon. We have about 3-4 hours of fermentation and I place it in a covered pan, in the refrigerator overnight and bake in the morning.

6)It takes much-much better freshly baked then a few hours later.

7)We do not yet have one of those clay baking pans yet that has an area for the water and an area for the bread. I am placing a pan of water in the oven too. The outside crust is a bit too hard so today I am going to try removing the aluminum foil in the last five minutes of baking only.

So my daughter still has overlapping medical issues and she really needs to use her CPAP but I personally believe her diet is near optimal now. With your help, we have now been able to cut out the All-Bran cereal and with it, the last source of added sugar. I think this will really help a lot and the past two day, the normal discomfort after breakfast was gone. She has terrible reactions to sugar and All-Bran was way better than the other things we had but it is still 1/7 sugar.

Thanks you so so much again-Pat
 
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Ima

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This was an incredibly informative and thoughtful thread, and although months have passed since, I've just started at this Forum and would like to thank you. It is profoundly challenging to reduce or cut out common dietary components - honestly sometimes I don't even know what to eat anymore. Posts like these are helpful practically.

1. Agreed, chia is very slimy, and makes the texture of baked goods unpleasantly mushy, as though the bread is under-baked. I can't bring myself to put in more than a teaspoon of chia into a loaf of bread.
2. GF-flour alternatives: when mixed with other flours, oat flour (oats ground in a food processor/blender to a fine powder) and teff flour have been helpful to me when making bread. Teff-based doughs become ridiculously liquid so I bake them in a structured pan, whereas oat flour based doughs hold their structure and can be baked on a baking sheet.
3. Table sugar alternatives: I'm not sure if these would be acceptable to HalfMadDad's family requirements, but I have successfully used other sources of sugar to feed the yeast in my bread doughs: coconut sugar (which has the most seductive smell), honey, maple syrup, molasses, malt syrup, homemade date syrup (boil dates + water, liquidize, strain. or if you want the healthy date fibre, don't strain). When citrus season returns, I intend to experiment with home-squeezed orange juice as the sugar to feed the yeast.
4. Yeast: natural yeast - ie sourdough - is a great solution. However, sourdough is also its own lifestyle, and I'm just a weekend home baker, so I'm trying to find ways without sourdough. I've halved the amount of commercial yeast in some recipes - the rise time is longer, and the rise is less impressive, but overall the loaves are still ok.

Anyway, months after these posts, it would be lovely to hear how folks are doing on the grain alternatives. I am now going to look out for einkorn at my specialty food-alternative grocer - thanks very much for suggesting this flour.

I am adding more and more foods to my intolerance list each year, and wonder if humans are engineering and pesticiding the food chain to a point where some of us will no longer be able to eat most things.
 
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Hi Norcalbaker!

Things are working great! Fedex was horrible but Central Milling was great. I baked sourdough over the past two days and my daughter loved it. We are going to order 50lbs now and the next order after this will likely be freight 250lbs+

Here is some extra notes in case it helps anyone else.

1)We have our starter working. We are feeding in a 1:3:3 ratio of starter:new food:water.

2)We are generating too much starter this way but we seem to do fine by feeding it and then refrigerating it.

3)I picked a simple sour dough recipe and it worked fine. There are lots of complex recipes out there and I felt overwhelmed with them.

4)We are supposed to leave it on a rack for 1 hour after baking but my kids like straight out of the oven.

5)I am doing all the mixing and fermenting in the afternoon. We have about 3-4 hours of fermentation and I place it in a covered pan, in the refrigerator overnight and bake in the morning.

6)It takes much-much better freshly baked then a few hours later.

7)We do not yet have one of those clay baking pans yet that has an area for the water and an area for the bread. I am placing a pan of water in the oven too. The outside crust is a bit too hard so today I am going to try removing the aluminum foil in the last five minutes of baking only.

So my daughter still has overlapping medical issues and she really needs to use her CPAP but I personally believe her diet is near optimal now. With your help, we have now been able to cut out the All-Bran cereal and with it, the last source of added sugar. I think this will really help a lot and the past two day, the normal discomfort after breakfast was gone. She has terrible reactions to sugar and All-Bran was way better than the other things we had but it is still 1/7 sugar.

Thanks you so so much again-Pat
Too much starter? - I make all sorts of pancakes/waffles with this. Add a couple of eggs and then go sweet or savoury.
My son is into the same lark, and he makes the starter just to use by itself - has only got to using it for bread a couple of times.
 
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This was an incredibly informative and thoughtful thread, and although months have passed since, I've just started at this Forum and would like to thank you. It is profoundly challenging to reduce or cut out common dietary components - honestly sometimes I don't even know what to eat anymore. Posts like these are helpful practically.

1. Agreed, chia is very slimy, and makes the texture of baked goods unpleasantly mushy, as though the bread is under-baked. I can't bring myself to put in more than a teaspoon of chia into a loaf of bread.
2. GF-flour alternatives: when mixed with other flours, oat flour (oats ground in a food processor/blender to a fine powder) and teff flour have been helpful to me when making bread. Teff-based doughs become ridiculously liquid so I bake them in a structured pan, whereas oat flour based doughs hold their structure and can be baked on a baking sheet.
3. Table sugar alternatives: I'm not sure if these would be acceptable to HalfMadDad's family requirements, but I have successfully used other sources of sugar to feed the yeast in my bread doughs: coconut sugar (which has the most seductive smell), honey, maple syrup, molasses, malt syrup, homemade date syrup (boil dates + water, liquidize, strain. or if you want the healthy date fibre, don't strain). When citrus season returns, I intend to experiment with home-squeezed orange juice as the sugar to feed the yeast.
4. Yeast: natural yeast - ie sourdough - is a great solution. However, sourdough is also its own lifestyle, and I'm just a weekend home baker, so I'm trying to find ways without sourdough. I've halved the amount of commercial yeast in some recipes - the rise time is longer, and the rise is less impressive, but overall the loaves are still ok.

Anyway, months after these posts, it would be lovely to hear how folks are doing on the grain alternatives. I am now going to look out for einkorn at my specialty food-alternative grocer - thanks very much for suggesting this flour.

I am adding more and more foods to my intolerance list each year, and wonder if humans are engineering and pesticiding the food chain to a point where some of us will no longer be able to eat most things.

The only thing I would say here is the sugar alternatives listed are NOT alternatives. Honey, molasses, and maple syrup are all liquid invert sugars. These are no different and no better that table sugar. They metabolize the same as table sugar, and cause the same blood sugar spikes as table sugar.
 

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