How much salt?

Discussion in 'Desserts' started by kentc, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. kentc

    kentc New Member

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    I have the following recipe:

    Ingredients
    • 2 cups all purpose flour
    • 13 tablespoons sugar, divided
    • 1 tablespoon baking powder
    • 1/2 cup (1 stick) chilled salted butter, diced
    • 1/2 cup finely chopped crystallized ginger, divided
    • 1/2 cup ginger ale
    • 3 tablespoons plus 1 1/4 cups chilled heavy whipping cream, divided
    • 4 large peaches, halved, thinly sliced
    I do not purchase salted butter. How much salt would you add to make up what is missing in my unsalted butter?
     
    kentc, Jul 6, 2019
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  2. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Baking is almost never done with salted butter to begin with, so this recipe is an outlier.

    Baking is also best done by weight measurements, not volume.

    If you measure the flour using the Spoon and Level method, then 2 cups flour is approximately 240g. I assume you’re making a tart crust. The salt would be 1.5% the weight of the flour. 240g flour x .015 = 3.6 g salt.

    A teaspoon of salt is 6 grams. So use 1/2 teaspoon salt.

    For reference
    1 tablespoon sugar = 12.5 g; 13 tablespoons sugar is approximately 162.5 g.

    1 stick or 1/2 cup butter = 113 g.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 6, 2019
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  3. kentc

    kentc New Member

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    Thanks for the help.Most of the recipes I use are written with weight measurements. I only make this shortcake once a year when local peaches are at their peak. Just never have gotten around to doing a weight conversion on it. I knew that salt had to be a certain percentage but could not recall what I'd used before.
     
    kentc, Jul 6, 2019
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  4. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    You’re welcome. Yes it is peach season I need to get out there and grab some for a cobbler myself
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 6, 2019
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  5. kentc

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Hmmm. Cobbler....my great-grandparents hailed from Poland and Russia and they made their way to California with stops either on the East Coast or in Canada respectively. From their background to where they came from in North America they had no inkling of Southern food/desserts and neither did my grandparents or parents outside of pecan pie—which I never really liked that much.

    I was an adult and married before I got around to trying another Southern dessert. It happened like this: One day my husband and I were in Pasadena—I can't remember why. We were walking around and we smelled this HEAVENLY fragrance. We crossed up and down the street literally following our noses. Where was it coming from? Finally we discovered the source: this tiny shop, no sign, no real windows and a screen door.

    In we went, and it turned out to be this itty-bitty bakery run by this old fellow who made nothing but cobblers. There was a fan blowing the warm, oven air around along with the sweet smells. In a display case was a clutter of disposable tins of cobblers. There was hardly any room to stand.

    My husband, whose mom was from Arkansas, explained to me what they were (I know there is contention over this, but he insists it's not a cobbler without a biscuit topping, and this old fellow made that kind). He sold them in different sizes, four servings or eight, I seem to remember. The one we had smelled was peach, fresh from the oven, and, of course, we purchased some. It was still warm in that tin, and tasted as good as it smelled.

    We learned that this guy's shop was actually famous; there were newspaper articles on him and everything. And they all said the same thing...everyone found that shop exactly as we did: by following that wonderful fragrance wafting down the street. The shop is long gone now, but it was a marvel, this place that sold only cobblers hidden away amid all those big buildings. Any-whoo...not long after tasing my first cobbler, I sought out recipes and made my own. They had my kitchen smelling almost as wonderful as that shop. And I remember wondering after pulling out my first, wildly successful peach cobbler: "These are like the best pies only super easy to make! Where have these been all my life?" :D

    So, thanks so much for reminding me of all that. I am now going to have to make a peach cobbler. ;)
     
    Last edited: Jul 18, 2019 at 4:43 AM
    J13, Jul 18, 2019 at 4:34 AM
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  6. kentc

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    J13, Jul 18, 2019 at 10:16 PM
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  7. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes there are cobblers, crips, and crumbles. The cobbler is fresh fruit with a biscuit top. The biscuit is not like the biscuit your avatar. Most bakers make a drop biscuit dough, so its a very wet dough. I make a cut out biscuit. But all the same, the topping is a low riser, but very light and delicate.

    Crips is fresh fruit with oats, nuts, spices and brown sugar

    Crumbles are fresh fruit and streusel topping, like a coffee cake topping

    My grandma was from Arkansas, a small town called Steprock, Arkansas.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 18, 2019 at 10:16 PM
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  8. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    hey if they got a good thing going why not. I'm not a fan of the pecan pie either. It's so cloyingly sweet. I'd rather have homemade butter pecan ice cream:p Being a southerner, my grandmother always had pecans in the house. It's my favorite nut. It's the star of my biscotti, forget the almonds:D
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 18, 2019 at 10:22 PM
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  9. kentc

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    Love pecans, too, though I have to say, I'm a little more into walnuts and hazelnuts if I'm picking a favorite. Black walnuts were a revelation, and when I come across them, I like to put them into my fave coffee cake recipe. I agree that pecan pie is too sweet, but it's my husband's favorite, so I learned to make it, and discovered that using Lyle's golden syrup in place of corn syrup makes a world of difference. Still very sweet, of course, that's the point, right? But much lighter and less cloying. And it allows for the flavor of those toasted pecans to really come through rather than being drowned out by the sweet.

    As for almonds...sometimes I crave them and will buy a bag to go through, but most of the time I'm not too fond of them. What I really don't like are almond flour and almond paste. My grandparents were brought up to view almond flour pastries as superior, almost aristocratic and so always served to guests. But I really dislike that flavor, and pretty much hated the cookies they served up.

    For a while there almond flour was out of favor, but now every other recipe I run across is almond flour this and almond paste that...I usually substitute with hazelnuts if I can.
     
    J13, Jul 19, 2019 at 1:49 AM
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  10. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Since gluten-free baking has become more popular there’s been a glut of almond flour on the market. And a lot of it is just too coarse. So I avoid using almond flour for the most part. If I use it, I buy Mandelin. Problem is it’s only available online, and the shipping is so expensive. But it really is the best almond flour. When I took a macaron class in Southern California the pastry chef said the almond flour and the white chocolate really makes a difference. She was right on both counts.

    My grandmother always put out a large bowl of mixed nuts in the shell from October through New Year. Pecans, hazelnuts, almonds, walnuts, and Brazil nuts. She also made roasted chestnuts at Christmas. I think this was a real southern thing because no other family I knew did this. She also always made fruitcake, mincemeat pie, rum balls, and rugelach. Of course rugelach is Jewish. Boy I hated those rum balls :eek: Some of those southern things I just never understood like why they thought horehound candy was a treat :confused:

    Lyle’s makes everything better. It’s impossible to find in stores now. The only way I can get it now is on the internet. Since Amazon bought Whole Foods they’ve stopped caring so many of my favorite products. :(
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 19, 2019 at 7:18 AM
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  11. kentc

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    I think that's a grandparent thing ;) My grandparents did the same, and my parents followed suit. It feels like one of those old traditions passed down from the Victorians like cut-glass candy dishes.:D From October till New Years, there were always nuts in the shell to crack. Usually those mixed nuts but sometimes just walnuts.
    Whole Foods stopped carrying it? :mad: I didn't know that because my tin of Lyle's doesn't get used up very fast. It sits in the pantry for a year or more before I need to restock. I just don't bake that many things that require "corn syrup." When I do, however, I always substitute Lyles.

    Well that's...disappointing.

    I'm fortunate in that I actually have a British import store near me—along with its so-so restaurant—selling all these British items from teapots (of course) to marmalade, baked beans, mince pies at Christmas, etc, etc. I haven't dropped in on them for a while, but I'd be shocked if they didn't have Lyles on their shelves. Looking around, it seems that Walmart, strangely, may also be selling it.
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2019 at 6:42 PM
    J13, Jul 19, 2019 at 6:36 PM
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  12. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    My grandma used to make us crack walnuts for her baking. What a pain that was because she didn’t want us to smash the nut meat. Gramps would give us hammers because there weren’t enough nutcrackers to go around. When you’re like 7 yrs old trying to crack a walnut without smashing it to smithereens with a hammer isn’t easy.

    Oh that cut glass candy dish… colored glass. My grandmother’s was red. And the fine china only came out on the holidays. But after my grandmother died my grandfather started using her fine china every day. He said what’s the use of owning it if you’re not going to use.

    Interesting we have a World Market in town with a whole section of British food where I buy elderflower cordial, marmalades, and jams. But they don’t even carry Lyle’s. We had a small independent grocery store in town that used to carry it, but they lost so much business to Whole Foods they closed last year. I shop regularly at Walmart but they don’t carry it. Speaking of Walmart you know they have the best price on Pulgra butter. They used to have the best price on Kerrygold too, but just two days ago the price went up to equal Whole Foods:mad: Good thing I had already stocked up and had 4 lbs in my refrigerator.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 19, 2019 at 7:59 PM
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  13. kentc

    J13 Well-Known Member

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    I'm pretty sure they used to; I've no idea why they stopped—I think they still carry Lyle's pancake syrup— but perhaps you should send them an email and ask for it? They might be open to carrying it again. What, after all, is a British food section without Lyle's golden syrup? :cool:
     
    J13, Jul 19, 2019 at 9:39 PM
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  14. kentc

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    This is a very useful percentage, NCB. I'm going to make shortbread biscuits using a recipe that calls for
    225g salted butter, 125g powdered sugar and 340g all purpose flour. I'll be using unsalted butter. I know another similar recipe that uses unsalted butter and says to add a 'pinch' of salt. Correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe a pinch is considered to be about an 1/8 of a gram? But would you suggest I add 1.5% of salt which I make to be 5.1g?

    Also, I'm thinking of using only 240g of the flour and ground rice for the remaining 100g. Apparently ground rice or rice flour gives a better texture in shortbread cookies.
     
    Lee_C, Jul 19, 2019 at 9:51 PM
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  15. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    I saw online that they had the pancake syrup a while back. But not the golden syrup:(
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 19, 2019 at 10:09 PM
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  16. kentc

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Oh, now you're talking. I wouldn't be without my golden syrup for my syrup sponge and custard pudding! :D

    20190719_215833.jpg 20181113_221828.jpg With custard.jpg
     
    Lee_C, Jul 19, 2019 at 10:10 PM
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  17. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    Yes a “pinch” of salt is 1/8 tsp.

    But you know what go start a thread on shortbread… I can really get neurotic about short bread. So I have a lot to say about shortbread
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 19, 2019 at 10:31 PM
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  18. kentc

    Norcalbaker59 Well-Known Member

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    My nephew mentioned golden syrup the other day, he asked what I was, I said I wasn’t sure how they made it; it was an invert sugar, and nectar of the gods.
     
    Norcalbaker59, Jul 19, 2019 at 10:35 PM
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  19. kentc

    Lee_C Well-Known Member

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    Oh yes, nectar of the gods. As is maple syrup on pancakes. :cool:

    Yes, I'll start a shortbread thread. And yes, thank you for correcting me on 1/8 of a teaspoon, not an 1/8 of a gram as I said.
     
    Lee_C, Jul 19, 2019 at 11:39 PM
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