Sweeter Italian Meringue Buttercream


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I have been wanting to try making Italian Meringue Buttercream, but what I have tasted is not sweet enough for me. I grew up eating American Buttercream. Is there a way to add more sugar when making the syrup? I really don't want to add powdered sugar to it at the end of mixing it. Thanks.
 
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The “standard” ratio for Italian meringue buttercream is 1:2:3


This is based on Baker‘s percentages. The constant would be the egg whites; egg whites are 100% in the formula, all other ingredients are weighed against the egg whites.



100% egg whites

200% granulated cane sugar

300% unsalted butter (83% butter fat)

When using baker’s percentages you can make whatever size batch you want.

Let say you crack 5 eggs and the egg whites weigh out to 270g.

Multiply the other ingredients by the weight of the egg whites.

Egg whites 100% = 1.00

Sugar is 200% = 2.00

Unsalted butter300% = 3.00



270g egg whites x 2.00 sugar = 540 g sugar

270 g egg whites x 3.00 unsalted butter = 810g unsalted butter

You can change the amount of sugar and butter simply by changing the ratios.

If you want to increase the sugar by 20%, just use 220% (2.20).

270g egg whites x 2.20 sugar = 594g sugar.

The amount of water added to the sugar syrup is insignificant because it’s boiled off. Just add enough water to cover the sugar. With a pastry brush wet the sides of the pot with a water to ensure no sugar crystals are on the on the inside of the pot. I let the sugar and water sit for a few minutes before I start heating it to allow the sugar to dissolve some.

What’s important is heating the syrup to the correct temperature; the sugar syrup must reache 240°F, but no more than 250°F, when you remove it from the heat.

I will say that the major selling point of Italian meringue buttercream is it is less sweet. If you serve a much sweeter version to people who prefer Italian meringue buttercream, then they probably will not like it. I actually reduce the amount of sugar in my Italian meringue buttercream because the addition of quality chocolate and other flavorings makes it too sweet for most people.

Definitely increase the sugar in small increments as you experiment. Keep in mind that sugar is hygroscopic, so it absorbs water from the environment. Too much sugar will destabilize the meringue.
 
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The “standard” ratio for Italian meringue buttercream is 1:2:3


This is based on Baker‘s percentages. The constant would be the egg whites; egg whites are 100% in the formula, all other ingredients are weighed against the egg whites.



100% egg whites

200% granulated cane sugar

300% unsalted butter (83% butter fat)

When using baker’s percentages you can make whatever size batch you want.

Let say you crack 5 eggs and the egg whites weigh out to 270g.

Multiply the other ingredients by the weight of the egg whites.

Egg whites 100% = 1.00

Sugar is 200% = 2.00

Unsalted butter300% = 3.00



270g egg whites x 2.00 sugar = 540 g sugar

270 g egg whites x 3.00 unsalted butter = 810g unsalted butter

You can change the amount of sugar and butter simply by changing the ratios.

If you want to increase the sugar by 20%, just use 220% (2.20).

270g egg whites x 2.20 sugar = 594g sugar.

The amount of water added to the sugar syrup is insignificant because it’s boiled off. Just add enough water to cover the sugar. With a pastry brush wet the sides of the pot with a water to ensure no sugar crystals are on the on the inside of the pot. I let the sugar and water sit for a few minutes before I start heating it to allow the sugar to dissolve some.

What’s important is heating the syrup to the correct temperature; the sugar syrup must reache 240°F, but no more than 250°F, when you remove it from the heat.

I will say that the major selling point of Italian meringue buttercream is it is less sweet. If you serve a much sweeter version to people who prefer Italian meringue buttercream, then they probably will not like it. I actually reduce the amount of sugar in my Italian meringue buttercream because the addition of quality chocolate and other flavorings makes it too sweet for most people.

Definitely increase the sugar in small increments as you experiment. Keep in mind that sugar is hygroscopic, so it absorbs water from the environment. Too much sugar will destabilize the meringue.
Thank you so much for this information. I definitely would not want to destabilize it since that is one of the great things about it. I did not know that about the temp not needing to go over 250 F. I am going to bookmark this.
 
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Thank you so much for this information. I definitely would not want to destabilize it since that is one of the great things about it. I did not know that about the temp not needing to go over 250 F. I am going to bookmark this.

Just play with the sugar and butter ratios until you find the percentages you like. I don’t use the standard ratios, like most bakers, I use ratios that suit my taste.

Here are some basic guidelines to flavor meringue buttercreams.

How to flavor Italian and Swiss meringue buttercream per batch based 300g egg whites.



Extracts: Mix in any flavor of extract to taste after butter is whipped in.



Vanilla bean & paste: for vanilla flavor I prefer to use vanilla bean or paste. Use 1/2 pulp of fresh vanilla bean or 10 g vanilla bean paste per batch.



Chocolate or white chocolate: melt and cool approximately 226g (8oz) of quality chocolate. Chocolate should be fluid, but cool. Mix into buttercream.



Purées: with purées, take care as too much can ruin the buttercream. Purée should be reduced to remove as much water as possible. Cook it down, then set it over a very fine sieve to drain for several hours.



Add small portions at a time to buttercream. The moisture in purée will vary by fruit, and batch by batch. So don’t assume you can add the same amount of purée of the same fruit. Also don’t forget to sieve purée with seeds and skins like raspberries and blueberries.



Alcohol: Bailey’s Irish Cream, Grand Marnier, amaretto, rum, whiskey, or whatever liquor you like to taste. But given it is a liquid keep it around 60mL (2oz) - 100mL (3.5oz) per batch. Again add a little at a time.



Coloring: buttercream can be resistant to color due to the butter. I would NOT recommend Wilton colors. Americolor gels mixed with a bit of their Flo-coat will create a smooth even colored buttercream. The flo-coat essentially converts the gel color to a food color that can be used in applications where moisture is an issue, like in candy.
 
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Joined
Dec 28, 2021
Messages
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1
Just play with the sugar and butter ratios until you find the percentages you like. I don’t use the standard ratios, like most bakers, I use ratios that suit my taste.

Here are some basic guidelines to flavor meringue buttercreams.

How to flavor Italian and Swiss meringue buttercream per batch based 300g egg whites.



Extracts: Mix in any flavor of extract to taste after butter is whipped in.



Vanilla bean & paste: for vanilla flavor I prefer to use vanilla bean or paste. Use 1/2 pulp of fresh vanilla bean or 10 g vanilla bean paste per batch.



Chocolate or white chocolate: melt and cool approximately 226g (8oz) of quality chocolate. Chocolate should be fluid, but cool. Mix into buttercream.



Purées: with purées, take care as too much can ruin the buttercream. Purée should be reduced to remove as much water as possible. Cook it down, then set it over a very fine sieve to drain for several hours.



Add small portions at a time to buttercream. The moisture in purée will vary by fruit, and batch by batch. So don’t assume you can add the same amount of purée of the same fruit. Also don’t forget to sieve purée with seeds and skins like raspberries and blueberries.



Alcohol: Bailey’s Irish Cream, Grand Marnier, amaretto, rum, whiskey, or whatever liquor you like to taste. But given it is a liquid keep it around 60mL (2oz) - 100mL (3.5oz) per batch. Again add a little at a time.



Coloring: buttercream can be resistant to color due to the butter. I would NOT recommend Wilton colors. Americolor gels mixed with a bit of their Flo-coat will create a smooth even colored buttercream. The flo-coat essentially converts the gel color to a food color that can be used in applications where moisture is an issue, like in candy.
Thank you so much! I have never heard of flo-coat. I will definitely look for it.
 

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