Baking videos - watch and share


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Yum, I love kedgeree! Wouldn't usually have it for breakfast though ;)
 
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Another unusual (to me, at least) trchnique from Canadian baker Anna Olson: in this chocolate Swiss roll, she added a cooked sugar syrup (to 239 degrees F, about 115C, or soft-ball) and added that to the whisked whole eggs, saying it kept the sponge cake pliable. I’d never seen this method, has any of you?
 
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Another unusual (to me, at least) trchnique from Canadian baker Anna Olson: in this chocolate Swiss roll, she added a cooked sugar syrup (to 239 degrees F, about 115C, or soft-ball) and added that to the whisked whole eggs, saying it kept the sponge cake pliable. I’d never seen this method, has any of you?

Hey Apocalypso! How are you? I bookmarked this video to watch when I have a moment (busy baking birthday cakes this weekend).

This is new to me too. I’m very curious. I’ve always used the towel method promoted by Rise Levy Beranbaum. That can be hit or miss. Now I want to bake a roulade
 
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Hey Apocalypso! How are you? I bookmarked this video to watch when I have a moment (busy baking birthday cakes this weekend).

This is new to me too. I’m very curious. I’ve always used the towel method promoted by Rise Levy Beranbaum. That can be hit or miss. Now I want to bake a roulade

Hi! She does use a towel to roll up the cake and "train" the roll.

I might try Anna's idea sometime, but I've had repeated success with roulades based on the simple "Asian style" cake roll I found online. Separated eggs, contains oil which keeps it light but pliable, and baked in a water bath. I bought a larger sheet pan just for that purpose. Keeps the bottom from setting too firmly.

I found this basic vanilla recipe online, from a young Asian girl living in the Netherlands. Her blog used to be called Writing Temptations and was available in both English and Dutch, but it seems to be offline. (Update: I found her new blog, but it's only in Dutch, so Google Translate can be helpful. http://www.linhsfoodspot.nl/2017/01/vanille-cake-rol-met-slagroom-swiss-roll/

I've since adapted this recipe to do chocolate, lemon, orange flavors, and because it's metric, I've scaled it up and down for various sizes, rounded to the whole egg quantities.

Vanilla Swiss Roll

5 eggs, separated
150 g caster sugar divided in half
40 g oil (I use grapeseed)
1 tsp vanilla extract
80 g flour (have done with both all purpose and cake flour, prefer cake flour for a lighter cake)

Beat egg whites, adding 1/2 the sugar, to stiff peaks but not dry. Set aside.
Mix the egg yolks, remaining half of the sugar, until light and fluffy. Add the oil and vanilla.
Sift the flour into the egg mixture and fold with a whisk until no dry flour is visible.
Fold in the beaten egg whites.
Spread evenly in a parchment lined jelly roll pan or rimmed baking sheet.
Bake at 160 C / 320F for about 23 minutes in a water bath (I use an extra large baking sheet lined with a
linen towel and filled halfway up the side of the cake pan with water. Keeps the cake from getting too well
done along the bottom and edges.)
Remove from the pan when done, and cool on the parchment on a wire rack. No real need to pre-roll the swiss
roll, this cake is extremely pliable and forgiving. Fill as desired.
Variations I've made: substitute 35g of the flour for cocoa powder. I sift them together three times before adding.
Add grated lemon, lime or orange zest and either juice or extract for the small quantity of vanilla. I made as a simple yellow cake roll for my Christmastime tiramisu yule log, brushed with espresso syrup and filled with a mascarpone whipped filling, then frosted with ganache. It went over pretty well.

I'm planning on making a lemon mousse cake, a sort of icebox cake, and I may use this trusted recipe made lemon flavored, then make some fresh lemon curd and make a lemon mousse filling. Though I may want a cake with a sturdier crumb like a pound cake or similar butter cake. I had an idea to bake it in my long thin loaf pan (IKEA special), then trim the edges and slice thinly, then reconstruct in the loaf pan, lined with plastic wrap and parchment, with mouse on the outsides, cake layers in between, then chilled or frozen before unmolding. If I can manage it by Saturday it might go to a party.

I started a new job, so I feel like I'm never home. That and, after a thankfully short bout of the stomach flu a month ago, I've been trying to eat less, and eat more sensibly in general. But hopefully I'll get a chance to make the lemon cake sometime soon. It's inspired by the limoncello cake a nearby Italian restaurant serves. I mentioned it a while back, but King Arthur Flour around Eastertime had posted a link to lemon recipes from their site, and I found two recipes that kind of inspired me, then did some further looking.
 
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Hi! She does use a towel to roll up the cake and "train" the roll.

I might try Anna's idea sometime, but I've had repeated success with roulades based on the simple "Asian style" cake roll I found online. Separated eggs, contains oil which keeps it light but pliable, and baked in a water bath. I bought a larger sheet pan just for that purpose. Keeps the bottom from setting too firmly.

I found this basic vanilla recipe online, from a young Asian girl living in the Netherlands. Her blog used to be called Writing Temptations and was available in both English and Dutch, but it seems to be offline. (Update: I found her new blog, but it's only in Dutch, so Google Translate can be helpful. http://www.linhsfoodspot.nl/2017/01/vanille-cake-rol-met-slagroom-swiss-roll/

I've since adapted this recipe to do chocolate, lemon, orange flavors, and because it's metric, I've scaled it up and down for various sizes, rounded to the whole egg quantities.

Vanilla Swiss Roll

5 eggs, separated
150 g caster sugar divided in half
40 g oil (I use grapeseed)
1 tsp vanilla extract
80 g flour (have done with both all purpose and cake flour, prefer cake flour for a lighter cake)

Beat egg whites, adding 1/2 the sugar, to stiff peaks but not dry. Set aside.
Mix the egg yolks, remaining half of the sugar, until light and fluffy. Add the oil and vanilla.
Sift the flour into the egg mixture and fold with a whisk until no dry flour is visible.
Fold in the beaten egg whites.
Spread evenly in a parchment lined jelly roll pan or rimmed baking sheet.
Bake at 160 C / 320F for about 23 minutes in a water bath (I use an extra large baking sheet lined with a
linen towel and filled halfway up the side of the cake pan with water. Keeps the cake from getting too well
done along the bottom and edges.)
Remove from the pan when done, and cool on the parchment on a wire rack. No real need to pre-roll the swiss
roll, this cake is extremely pliable and forgiving. Fill as desired.
Variations I've made: substitute 35g of the flour for cocoa powder. I sift them together three times before adding.
Add grated lemon, lime or orange zest and either juice or extract for the small quantity of vanilla. I made as a simple yellow cake roll for my Christmastime tiramisu yule log, brushed with espresso syrup and filled with a mascarpone whipped filling, then frosted with ganache. It went over pretty well.

I'm planning on making a lemon mousse cake, a sort of icebox cake, and I may use this trusted recipe made lemon flavored, then make some fresh lemon curd and make a lemon mousse filling. Though I may want a cake with a sturdier crumb like a pound cake or similar butter cake. I had an idea to bake it in my long thin loaf pan (IKEA special), then trim the edges and slice thinly, then reconstruct in the loaf pan, lined with plastic wrap and parchment, with mouse on the outsides, cake layers in between, then chilled or frozen before unmolding. If I can manage it by Saturday it might go to a party.

I started a new job, so I feel like I'm never home. That and, after a thankfully short bout of the stomach flu a month ago, I've been trying to eat less, and eat more sensibly in general. But hopefully I'll get a chance to make the lemon cake sometime soon. It's inspired by the limoncello cake a nearby Italian restaurant serves. I mentioned it a while back, but King Arthur Flour around Eastertime had posted a link to lemon recipes from their site, and I found two recipes that kind of inspired me, then did some further looking.

Sorry to hear you were ill. This past flu season was pretty bad. I don’t usually get sick because I tend toward OCD hand washing. But I ended up sick this year.

The water bath technique is interesting. It certainly makes sense given batter in a shallow pan bakes hotter and faster. So insulating and cooling the pan with water is a cleaver way to control the baking. So that has me really curious as well. We Asians (or at least the Japanese) are obsessed with two types of cake: roulades and strawberry cake.

I’m definitely going to give your roulade recipe a try—and fill it with mascarpone chantilly.

I’ve been messing with a mascarpone chantilly filling/icing that is stabilized with gelatin. I baked two cakes for my nieces birthday, a dark chocolate mocha cake with milk chocolate SMBC and a elderflower lemon chiffon cake. For the filling I layered sliced strawberries, blackberries, and raspberries on top of a lemon curd, then added a layer of the mascarpone chantilly. I didn’t have enough of the mascarpone chantilly to ice the entire cake so I iced the top and did a thin coat on the sides for a naked cake. That cake got a lot of high praise. But I need to re-think the assembly on the cake if I use berries again. The chiffon cake is a bit too delicate for the weight of all that filling.

I had about half a cup of the mascarpone chantilly left, So I ate it this morning with the leftover berries. And OMG, we should all get to eat fresh berries with mascarpone chantilly for breakfast at least once in our lives.

The Writing Temptations blog is really lovely. I’m definitely going to google translate some of her recipes.

If you make the lemon icebox cake, I’d love to hear how it turns out.
 
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Another unusual (to me, at least) trchnique from Canadian baker Anna Olson: in this chocolate Swiss roll, she added a cooked sugar syrup (to 239 degrees F, about 115C, or soft-ball) and added that to the whisked whole eggs, saying it kept the sponge cake pliable. I’d never seen this method, has any of you?

If the correct swiss roll recipe is used there no need to make a softball syrup.
The proceedure in bakeries is to roll the sponge up into a log when its still hot from the oven.
Leave the paper on. when cold unroll and strip the paper off.
In cold weather or ice cold eggs I put the sugar on a tray and heat it up in the oven, then add to the whipping eggs.
The downside of a syrup is time and another uneccessary dirty pot.
 
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Hi! She does use a towel to roll up the cake and "train" the roll.

I might try Anna's idea sometime, but I've had repeated success with roulades based on the simple "Asian style" cake roll I found online. Separated eggs, contains oil which keeps it light but pliable, and baked in a water bath. I bought a larger sheet pan just for that purpose. Keeps the bottom from setting too firmly.

I found this basic vanilla recipe online, from a young Asian girl living in the Netherlands. Her blog used to be called Writing Temptations and was available in both English and Dutch, but it seems to be offline. (Update: I found her new blog, but it's only in Dutch, so Google Translate can be helpful. http://www.linhsfoodspot.nl/2017/01/vanille-cake-rol-met-slagroom-swiss-roll/

I've since adapted this recipe to do chocolate, lemon, orange flavors, and because it's metric, I've scaled it up and down for various sizes, rounded to the whole egg quantities.

Vanilla Swiss Roll

5 eggs, separated
150 g caster sugar divided in half
40 g oil (I use grapeseed)
1 tsp vanilla extract
80 g flour (have done with both all purpose and cake flour, prefer cake flour for a lighter cake)

Beat egg whites, adding 1/2 the sugar, to stiff peaks but not dry. Set aside.
Mix the egg yolks, remaining half of the sugar, until light and fluffy. Add the oil and vanilla.
Sift the flour into the egg mixture and fold with a whisk until no dry flour is visible.
Fold in the beaten egg whites.
Spread evenly in a parchment lined jelly roll pan or rimmed baking sheet.
Bake at 160 C / 320F for about 23 minutes in a water bath (I use an extra large baking sheet lined with a
linen towel and filled halfway up the side of the cake pan with water. Keeps the cake from getting too well
done along the bottom and edges.)
Remove from the pan when done, and cool on the parchment on a wire rack. No real need to pre-roll the swiss
roll, this cake is extremely pliable and forgiving. Fill as desired.
Variations I've made: substitute 35g of the flour for cocoa powder. I sift them together three times before adding.
Add grated lemon, lime or orange zest and either juice or extract for the small quantity of vanilla. I made as a simple yellow cake roll for my Christmastime tiramisu yule log, brushed with espresso syrup and filled with a mascarpone whipped filling, then frosted with ganache. It went over pretty well.

I'm planning on making a lemon mousse cake, a sort of icebox cake, and I may use this trusted recipe made lemon flavored, then make some fresh lemon curd and make a lemon mousse filling. Though I may want a cake with a sturdier crumb like a pound cake or similar butter cake. I had an idea to bake it in my long thin loaf pan (IKEA special), then trim the edges and slice thinly, then reconstruct in the loaf pan, lined with plastic wrap and parchment, with mouse on the outsides, cake layers in between, then chilled or frozen before unmolding. If I can manage it by Saturday it might go to a party.

I started a new job, so I feel like I'm never home. That and, after a thankfully short bout of the stomach flu a month ago, I've been trying to eat less, and eat more sensibly in general. But hopefully I'll get a chance to make the lemon cake sometime soon. It's inspired by the limoncello cake a nearby Italian restaurant serves. I mentioned it a while back, but King Arthur Flour around Eastertime had posted a link to lemon recipes from their site, and I found two recipes that kind of inspired me, then did some further looking.

That sponge recipe is a very specific type , in france its called a biscuit.
Its very good, has a sort of marshmallow texture.
I was a pastry chef in a french cafe yrs ago, I had this sponge right from the oven and gave a peice to a french waitress, I said heres some genoise.
She immediately tasted it and said no its not genoise, its biscuit. (bis kwee).
In France she was a school teacher, not food trained.
Thats how educated the french palate is.
We will never ever catch up to them.
 
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I watch a lot of baking videos, so I thought it might be a nice idea to have a place to share interesting videos! So if you watch something that you think others would be interested in, then feel free to share it here :)

If you're not sure how to embed videos in your post, all you need to do is copy the video URL (eg from YouTube), click on the Media button (it's two buttons to the right of the Smilies button) and paste in the URL. Then click Embed and the video will be embedded into your post.

I'll start things off! I saw this video the other day and thought it was interesting how she carved a pattern into the gingerbread before baking it - I assumed it would disappear during baking, but it looked really good! I don't have any plans to make this chest but I thought it was a clever idea:

Bake With Me: Jessie James Decker Pumpkin Bread [2020 Holiday Hit!]
 
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The link didn't work for me either. I did a search and wonder whether VoluntaryBaker was talking about the series from Townsends? They do lots of Colonial-America cooking, baking, and houseware videos which are fascinating.
The Townsends are exactly who I was talking about.

I’ve always been fascinated by history. When I was younger, I was most interested in the wars and the politics. Recently, that fascination has turned to cultural history, particularly the history of the foods we eat. I’m in the (very slow) planning process for building a clay or brick oven.

Here is the video again. Maybe it’ll work better this way.
 
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