Shortcrust Pastry

Discussion in 'Pastry' started by Jen, Apr 22, 2017.

  1. Jen

    Jen Member

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    Hey all.. I'm new to the forums and apart from the odd pie and cake here and there, new to baking too.

    Well I adore pastry - shortcrust being one of my faves. But how it can differ from one pie, flan or tart to the next! There seems to be many a way to make this delicious pastry dough.. freezing the butter and flour for 10 mins, leaving it in the fridge for 20 mins, rubbing together by hand, using a food processor, pressing the crumbly mix together to form the dough...

    Personally, I think the pastry is as important as the filling itself. so many quiches that were ALMOST there, but let down by a bland pastry... I cannot make that same mistake!

    So, I'm really interested to hear from all you bakers out there... how do you make the perfect shortcrust pastry?
     
    Jen, Apr 22, 2017
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  2. Jen

    Becky Administrator

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    Welcome to the forum! :)

    I use the food processor method - I make sure that the ingredients are cold, then whizz up the butter and flour together to form a sandy texture. Then I add the egg and iced water if it needs more liquid to bring it together. It makes a beautiful pastry with a very short texture.
     
    Becky, Apr 23, 2017
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  3. Jen

    RoseMGenuine Active Member

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    I have an oil and flour recipe I use with pies when I'm short on time but really want to bring a pie. It doesn't sound like it would be good but it is. People always ask for the recipe. You don't even have to roll it. Just press it in.
     
    RoseMGenuine, Apr 25, 2017
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  4. Jen

    Jen Member

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    Thanks Becky, I imagine using a food processor like you described would make for a short texture... I will have to invest in one! I guess I will try by hand for now and just make sure all my ingredients are as cold as possible. One other question... would you say it's necessary to blind bake all pie cases or just ones with runny fillings?
     
    Jen, Apr 26, 2017
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  5. Jen

    Jen Member

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    Hi Rose, I hadn't thought of using oil for pastry... I will have to experiment I think! Does it make a firmer pastry or still quite short? I imagine different textures would work well for different fillings. I only cook vegetarian food, but I like to recreate convincing alternatives to meat dishes. Thanks for your reply!
     
    Jen, Apr 26, 2017
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  6. Jen

    Becky Administrator

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    If you don't have a food processor you could use a pastry blade - it's a bit like a potato masher I guess, and it allows you to combine the butter with the flour without touching it (heat from your hands can melt the butter).

    You're right, it tends to be pies with a liquidy filling as they are most likely to cause a soggy bottom :)
     
    Becky, Apr 27, 2017
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